The Case Against Good Coffee - Page 2

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
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BaristaBoy E61
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#11: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

Jeff wrote:Without contrast, the greatness of one set of options can become lost.
+1 for contrast!

Sometimes I do drink instant when I must, it's no big deal. Most people are afraid to serve me anything coffee because of our setup. I tell them to please not be silly. It's another beverage to try and enjoy.
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

Cranked
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#12: Post by Cranked »

It's true that I find most coffee I have in cafes disappointing. But I would rather be disappointed by cafe coffee once month than disappointed by my home coffee every day.

jpender
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#13: Post by jpender »

Jeff wrote:I get it. Seriously, there are times when I want something warm to drink and hold in my hands. I don't care if it is great coffee or dashi, mediochre tea or steeped things, or even crappy coffee that needs a lot of cream. Without contrast, the greatness of one set of options can become lost.
Yeah, but this guy isn't just having the odd cup of Postum. He's drinking instant *every* day. Think about that.

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another_jim
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#14: Post by another_jim »

To misquote Epictetus: there are the things you are into, and the things you are not. Maybe don't write op eds about the things you are not into?
Jim Schulman

Quester
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#15: Post by Quester »

Jeff wrote:Without contrast, the greatness of one set of options can become lost.
One of my earliest memories of something my father said was in reference to salt water taffy in Estes Park, Colorado. He said something like, "they have yellow ones, so you can better appreciate the pink ones." I'm not sure I remember the colors, but I remember the essence of the idea.

DamianWarS
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#16: Post by DamianWarS »

romlee wrote:From the New York Times (sorry, you may need to have subscribed). A gentle reminder for me and, possibly others, that all the "ballet" and "faff" that we have the privilege to enjoy is just that: it can be good enough.

https://www.nytimes.com/2024/04/02/maga ... &sgrp=c-cb
I can't think of anyone after reading this article will toss their pod machine for instant because pods are not convenient enough or too messy. Outside of that, does a father with young kids looking for a coffee time saver who is frustrated by drip machines even exist? do drip machines and newspapers even exist? where are the newpaper offices full of british expats drinking their nescafe, where are the young fathers with their drip machines? this either sounds like 30 year old article pulled from the archives before pods were commonplace or it's a 60 yr old with toddlers.

rmongiovi
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#17: Post by rmongiovi »

Jeff wrote:Without contrast, the greatness of one set of options can become lost.
"Only in silence the word,
Only in dark the light,
Only in dying life:
Bright the hawk's flight
On the empty sky.
-The Creation of Éa"

― Ursula K. Le Guin

kye
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#18: Post by kye »

It sounds like it might be addressed / targeted at people other than ourselves. I saw a comedy routine recently that was blasting coffee snobs, and the routine made fun of being picky and talking about flavour and the various tasting notes, but the thing that was really bugging the comedian was that these people were doing it to be "better" than the other people around them.
I would imagine this is a common occurrence in many places in the world, and maybe the point of the author was to remind people that those people and their judgements don't matter and we should do whatever we want.

jpender
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#19: Post by jpender »

kye wrote:It sounds like it might be addressed / targeted at people other than ourselves.
The author says clearly that for him it's all about the caffeine. He doesn't really like the taste of coffee that much. That's all fine but that he tries to turn it into a "case against good coffee" is ludicrous. To be fair, he may not have had anything to do with the headline.

Articles like this one are the reason I only rarely look at the NY Times -- even though I pay for a subscription (for my wife).

kye
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#20: Post by kye replying to jpender »

My experience with any controversial opinions is that you can never really know what the persons motivations are, as often they have nothing to do with what is being discussed, and often the person doesn't even know why themselves.

In terms of assessing quality of media, I used to check the news websites in my city to keep up with the goings on, but when I noticed an article that had more than three spelling mistakes I set a new rule that I wouldn't trust the content of a publication that can't even use spell check and proof read their content. This eliminated every publication. This was probably fortunate, because my next step was to eliminate those without critical thinking skills, which would probably have gotten the remaining ones!
You'd imagine that the NY Times would be of a higher standard than the publications of my city, which has a population of 2.3M people, but considering that none even made it to the critical thinking test, and you might want to add a bias check for any that passed the critical thinking assessment, yeah, it's not looking good!