Association of coffee consumption with mortality...

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
Marcelnl
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#1: Post by Marcelnl »

Association of Sugar-Sweetened, Artificially Sweetened, and Unsweetened Coffee Consumption With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality
A Large Prospective Cohort Study

https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/abs/10.7326/M21-2977
Annals of Internal Medicine wrote:Previous observational studies have suggested an association between coffee intake and reduced risk for death, but these studies did not distinguish between coffee consumed with sugar or artificial sweeteners and coffee consumed without.

Objective: To evaluate the associations of consumption of sugar-sweetened, artificially sweetened, and unsweetened coffee with all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

Conclusion: Moderate consumption of unsweetened and sugar-sweetened coffee was associated with lower risk for death.
LMWDP #483

Capuchin Monk

#2: Post by Capuchin Monk »

The crux of the problem with such article is the definition of "Moderate consumption". There is no set quantity that applies to all. Moderate for some people may be too much for others.

maximatica

#3: Post by maximatica »

I've followed this type of stuff (loosely) over the years and the ones that have been long-term and with a wide dataset have always come back with coffee overall being beneficial.

The largest and longest even found that smokers who drank coffee lived longer than smokers who didn't drink coffee (but I always thought it was always to be a twosome, a cup of coffee, and a cigarette).

So, for those of us who keep the overall crappy-foods-intake to a minimum have a good chance to make it to 70 :D .

Anyway, even if it cut your life by a year or 2, a life with coffee beats a longer life without (or so some of us think).

(once you start riding motorcycles, these piddly longer-life issues disappear since you can cash-out every 50 yards/meters while riding a bike).

Stay Safe!

Thanks,

M./

maximatica

#4: Post by maximatica »

As I remember they usually peg moderate at 4-6 and heavy consumption at 8 cups.

But the most beneficial volatile compounds (created during the brew process) have pretty much dissipated about 20 minutes after brewing so those cold brew folks are (perhaps) SOL. (and those visiting a murky pot every hour or so in the break room).

HTH.

Pressino

#5: Post by Pressino »

An even greater concern in such studies like this is what is called selection bias in the populations compared (i.e. coffee drinkers versus nondrinkers). For example, folks who don't drink coffee may be abstaining from it because of health concerns (e.g. having hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, etc.

It would be interesting to see a study of those who add alcohol to their coffee...for example caffe corretto (w/ grappa, anisette, etc) and "Irish Coffee."

Capuchin Monk

#6: Post by Capuchin Monk »

maximatica wrote:So, for those of us who keep the overall crappy-foods-intake to a minimum
Table sugar is one of the crappiest of the crappy foods.

Marcelnl (original poster)
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#7: Post by Marcelnl (original poster) »

Pressino wrote:An even greater concern in such studies like this is what is called selection bias in the populations compared (i.e. coffee drinkers versus nondrinkers). For example, folks who don't drink coffee may be abstaining from it because of health concerns (e.g. having hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, etc.

It would be interesting to see a study of those who add alcohol to their coffee...for example caffe corretto (w/ grappa, anisette, etc) and "Irish Coffee."
Did you read the article? they did correct for those effects, it's complicated stuff but proven to work... so I'm not sure you can dismiss the results that easily, and it was a prospective study!

Compared with nonconsumers, consumers of various amounts of unsweetened coffee (>0 to 1.5, >1.5 to 2.5, >2.5 to 3.5, >3.5 to 4.5, and >4.5 drinks/d) had lower risks for all-cause mortality after adjustment for lifestyle, sociodemographic, and clinical factors, with respective hazard ratios of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.90), 0.84 (CI, 0.74 to 0.95), 0.71 (CI, 0.62 to 0.82), 0.71 (CI, 0.60 to 0.84), and 0.77 (CI, 0.65 to 0.91);
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Pressino

#8: Post by Pressino »

Marcelnl wrote:Did you read the article? they did correct for those effects, it's complicated stuff but proven to work... so I'm not sure you can dismiss the results that easily, and it was a prospective study!

Compared with nonconsumers, consumers of various amounts of unsweetened coffee (>0 to 1.5, >1.5 to 2.5, >2.5 to 3.5, >3.5 to 4.5, and >4.5 drinks/d) had lower risks for all-cause mortality after adjustment for lifestyle, sociodemographic, and clinical factors, with respective hazard ratios of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.90), 0.84 (CI, 0.74 to 0.95), 0.71 (CI, 0.62 to 0.82), 0.71 (CI, 0.60 to 0.84), and 0.77 (CI, 0.65 to 0.91);
The highlighted portion of the passage you site is critical...and it's not at all clear exactly what "clinical factors" besides selecting participants "without cardiovascular disease (CVD) or cancer at baseline ". How did they determine the presence of absence of cardiovascular disease in their massive (171,616) study population? And did they also select a random sample from the general population, which would involve questioning those who were non-drinkers why they chose not to drink coffee?

So, yes I did read the article and still think there could be some sample selection bias. It's not all that easy to "correct" for that, especially in medical studies like this one.

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mkane
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#9: Post by mkane »

At my age who cares.

maximatica

#10: Post by maximatica »

Capuchin Monk wrote:Table sugar is one of the crappiest of the crappy foods.
But in their report, they showed that the coffee drinkers who used sugar had a higher percentage of longer lives.

Here's one for 'ya - your nervous system needs about 180 milligrams of sodium a day to function.

You lose sodium through sweat and tears and other paths so your body needs perhaps 500-800 milligrams to stay at the proper level.

The high levels of sodium only appeared in the human diet when they started to salt the meat for ocean voyages.

Now 2,000 milligrams a day is considered a low amount.

Your body evolved over millions of years to be able to withstand the level of sodium found in nature.

What is all that excess sodium doing to people's nervous systems?

All those nervous system diseases? all caused by excess sodium.

Sugar is much lower on the scale of harmful foods than sodium.