Argon for Coffee Storage

Want to talk espresso but not sure which forum? If so, this is the right one.
JHCCoffee
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#1: Post by JHCCoffee »

If you do this, how do you do it? What equipment do you use? What argon bottles/brands do you use?

Do you still freeze beans? Lightly vacuum packed and frozen, then unfrozen and use argon?

As an alternative, what about nitrogen?

What containers and lids do you use with the argon? Has anyone tried this: https://planetarydesign.com/product/airgone-argon-gas/

Milligan
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#2: Post by Milligan »

I've only heard of nitrogen being used. It is cheaper and works just as well. Mainly we are looking to displace oxygen from the container with something that doesn't react with coffee. It usually comes down to price of the cheapest gas that will do the trick. Some roasters do a nitrogen purge on their bags but I haven't heard of home enthusiasts doing that. The freezer is typically easier and already available.

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baldheadracing
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#3: Post by baldheadracing »

In the linked page, coffee is shown because they don't want to show marijuana :wink:.

You more-or-less have to pressurize an inert gas to preserve coffee as, well, coffee is a seed and has a seed's cell structure. There is a system that can be used at home on the market that has been positively reviewed, but the price is close to $1k:
Seeking feedback on Coffee Freshness System prototype
Coffee Freshness System
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

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yakster
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#4: Post by yakster »

Argon is commonly used in wine preservation. I've never tried it, instead I roast just enough coffee to use up in a couple of weeks without having to freeze or use other preservation systems. It works for me, I enjoy observing the changes in flavor as coffee rests and I roast light enough that longer rest is beneficial, but people with sharper tasting acuity may still want to seek enhanced coffee storage systems.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

ira
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#5: Post by ira »

The commercial solution uses C02 which is way less money and doesn't accidentally replace the CO2 in the beans with something else. I believe they pressurize to something like 10PSI after flushing enough to insure less than 1% air or something like that. It has gotten really good reviews from the few people who've talked about using one.

Jonk
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#6: Post by Jonk »

I have been meaning to try co2 since discovering that oxidation seems to be a problem (to some extent) even if freezing beans. I was just planning to flush the containers with co2 to reduce the oxygen content, but I guess now I'll add a flushed and pressurized tube to the mix.

You can buy fairly inexpensive plastic carbonation caps to be used with PET-bottles or tubes. They're not completely impermeable so it won't be perfect, but maybe good enough.

Vacuum sealed Mylar bags sounds like they could be more flexible and less trouble while potentially better. Especially if you'd like to store beans for years.

Shorter term, I have been fairly happy with just filling these containers:
They cost about 45 cents each, so about $45 to have a stock of 2kg to rotate in the freezer. Carbonation caps would obviously only make sense for larger containers.

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#7: Post by Pressino »

Milligan wrote:I've only heard of nitrogen being used. It is cheaper and works just as well. Mainly we are looking to displace oxygen from the container with something that doesn't react with coffee. It usually comes down to price of the cheapest gas that will do the trick. Some roasters do a nitrogen purge on their bags but I haven't heard of home enthusiasts doing that. The freezer is typically easier and already available.
I've managed to avoid the expense of acquiring tanks of 100% nitrogen by storing coffee in the refrigerator in sealed jars with 78% nitrogen. I've also saved money using the same mixture rather than pure nitrogen when inflating my automobile tires.

jpender
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#8: Post by jpender »

But I'll bet if you grind and brew your tires it tastes stale.

Jonk
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#9: Post by Jonk »

Pressino wrote:I've managed to avoid the expense of acquiring tanks of 100% nitrogen by storing coffee in the refrigerator in sealed jars with 78% nitrogen. I've also saved money using the same mixture rather than pure nitrogen when inflating my automobile tires.
Tongue in cheek aside, this is actually used as marketing for a nitro cold brew dispenser from Tone. It seems "we're using nitrogen from the air!" pretty much means "we're using air!" :lol: (and then it's sold at 5x the price of a similar tap with an air compressor for serving..)

Milligan
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#10: Post by Milligan »

Pressino wrote:I've managed to avoid the expense of acquiring tanks of 100% nitrogen by storing coffee in the refrigerator in sealed jars with 78% nitrogen. I've also saved money using the same mixture rather than pure nitrogen when inflating my automobile tires.
I get that you are joking, but for those that may reference this thread in the future... It's not about the nitrogen, its about not having oxygen.
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