Accelerating resting of roasted coffee

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jasonmolinari

#1: Post by jasonmolinari »

I got a nice bag of Ethiopian Konga just last week and promptly put it in the freezer under vacuum about 6 days after roast.

Pulled a bag out yesterday and today it's clear in my shot that it needs more rest. It got me thinking about accelerating the rest phase.

Based on the Arrhenius equation the rate of a chemical reaction speeds up with temperature. Ballpark is for every 10C in temperature increase the rate doubles.

Can the resting phase of coffee be considered a chemical reaction? I think so. So can I gently warm my beans to say 40C and quadruple the resting rate vs a 21C room? So leaving it at 40c for 1 day would be equivalent to 4 days at room temp?

Guess I need to try it with a small quantity and do a side by side, but just figured I'd throw the ide out there for minds smarter than mine to discuss!

Ps: there is a mention of Illy looking into the Arrhenius equation but it seems more for volatile compounds of brewed or ground coffee and for freezing.

wallaro7

#2: Post by wallaro7 »

That's an interesting idea. I would say also considering Illy information. Some oxidation also is taking place at the same time as the out gassing during this phase. The oxidation may not scale at the same rate as out gassing with temperature, but the difference may not be noticeable. Let us know how the test goes. To answer your question, The out gassing is a physical process.

wallaro7

#3: Post by wallaro7 »

Correction, I just read your question again. I believe based on the discussion on pg 230 in Illy's book, There are both chemical and physical changes taking place during the rest phase.

jpender

#4: Post by jpender »

I'm not a chemist. I know that when I make kimchi or beer at a higher temperature it finishes sooner but also tastes different. Those are biological of course.

So how do these aging reactions proceed? If they can be modeled as exponentially decaying processes, each with a different time constant, then increasing each of those time constants by the same multiple will result in a different ratio of product at some later time. If that's the case then it will be more like my kimchi.... which actually tastes good when it's fermented a little warmer, just different. But anyway, that's just me imagining.

So try it... maybe it will be clear from the taste.

jasonmolinari (original poster)

#5: Post by jasonmolinari (original poster) » replying to jpender »


Fermentation is affected by temperature based on the temperature preferentials of different bacteria producing lactic, or acetic acid. That's why products fermented at different temps taste different.
This, not being a biological process, i think would be different...but i'll find out.
Leaving it at 50C in a mason jar for 24 hours. Tomorrow i'll try it side by side with the room temp stored beans (also in a mason jar)

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yakster
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#6: Post by yakster »

You should still keep the coffee in the dark while accelerating the aging if possible.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

jasonmolinari (original poster)

#7: Post by jasonmolinari (original poster) » replying to yakster »

Whoops !

dsc106

#8: Post by dsc106 »

You could use a Sous vide water bath and set it very low, drop the vacuum sealed bag in there. Water conducts heat much faster than air so this will rapidly accelerate to the exact target temp, with no overage.

On other hand, couldn't you just grind and let rest for 5 minutes? Scott Rao says in the 5 min after grinding you'll lose a substantial amount of CO2 and I believe this can be used to help instantly age a single dose of coffee!

jpender

#9: Post by jpender »

jasonmolinari wrote: Fermentation is affected by temperature based on the temperature preferentials of different bacteria producing lactic, or acetic acid. That's why products fermented at different temps taste different.
This, not being a biological process, i think would be different...but i'll find out.
Leaving it at 50C in a mason jar for 24 hours. Tomorrow i'll try it side by side with the room temp stored beans (also in a mason jar)
It was an analogy. My point was that you are assuming that the aging products accumulate linearly with time for scaling their rates to maintain the same ratios.

Marcelnl
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#10: Post by Marcelnl »

accelerating aging is likely possible yet I expect finding out the right temperature and duration may prove a nightmare and the result is likely different per coffee and roast.
LMWDP #483