Accelerating resting of roasted coffee - Page 2

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jasonmolinari (original poster)

#11: Post by jasonmolinari (original poster) »

dsc106 wrote:You could use a Sous vide water bath and set it very low, drop the vacuum sealed bag in there. Water conducts heat much faster than air so this will rapidly accelerate to the exact target temp, with no overage.

On other hand, couldn't you just grind and let rest for 5 minutes? Scott Rao says in the 5 min after grinding you'll lose a substantial amount of CO2 and I believe this can be used to help instantly age a single dose of coffee!

Yep that's exactly what i did. I actually used a mason jar. A vac bag would have been smarter:) Set it at 55C and circulated for 24hrs.

jasonmolinari (original poster)

#12: Post by jasonmolinari (original poster) »

Just a quick update.
Circulated 6oz of beans in a 55C water bath with the beans in a mason jar. Upon opening there was noticeable "puff" from out gassing. I did not get that same puff on opening the mason jar of room temp beans, so clearly something was accellerated.

Having said that, i pulled 2 shots back to back. 16g in, 32g out at 200F in 35 seconds, and honestly i'd be hard pressed to tell which is which. I can likely IMAGINE that the heated beans maybe were a touch smoother, but i'm pretty sure that's in my mind.

So, interesting thought experiment, but as a N of 1, i don't see a benefit, based on the variables i chose.

I'll pull one more shot after grinding and letting it outgas for 5 minutes (which i've also wondered about)..and see how it compares....

CoffeeCoffeeCoffee
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#13: Post by CoffeeCoffeeCoffee »

jasonmolinari wrote: grinding and letting it outgas for 5 minutes .
Scott Rao recommends 30 to 45 minutes for Roast + 1D beans. I tried this a few times for beans a few days old (the fresher the longer, 5 to 30 mins) and it worked very well.

Someone here tell me if I am wrong, but I recall reading that benefical chemical reactions happen within a few hours /days post roast, and after that it is just staling. So 'grind and wait' seems to be reasonable approach, and the loss of volatile compound does not seem to be substancial
The only criteria that really matters is how much you enjoyed your coffee

jpender

#14: Post by jpender »

CoffeeCoffeeCoffee wrote:Someone here tell me if I am wrong, but I recall reading that benefical chemical reactions happen within a few hours /days post roast, and after that it is just staling. So 'grind and wait' seems to be reasonable approach, and the loss of volatile compound does not seem to be substancial
If coffee aging is just a matter of waiting for the beans to degas then we're all wasting a lot of time with beans sitting for days or weeks when we could instead wait tens of minutes post-grind. It can't be that simple.