why does it seem that pro-roasts last longer than home?

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
LeoZ
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#1: Post by LeoZ »

ever notice that?
buy preroasted beans, and they seem to have a good lifecycle.

home roasted, on the other hand, a couple of weeks, max.

do pro-roasters extend the roasts which could help lengthen lifespan?

another far stretch, buy lavazza. ok, not ideal, but still a great tasting bean, and not anywhere as flat as a homeroasted bean would taste, especially after 2-3 months!

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oofnik

#2: Post by oofnik »

Yeah, I noticed that too. I can't figure it out... :?:

coffee_monkey

#3: Post by coffee_monkey »

Based on my experience and what I've read, it had to do with the type of roaster (and the heat source it uses) and the roast profile, which results in different heat transfer rate/efficiency than most home roasters.
Ben Chen

LeoZ
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#4: Post by LeoZ » replying to coffee_monkey »

So DRUM > AIR?

coffee_monkey

#5: Post by coffee_monkey » replying to LeoZ »

direct flame drum > semi hot air drum > air

Roast profile also have a great affect on it... largely due to what you've done to the bean cell structure in your roasts. In a overly simplified explanation, faster roasts tend to shred up the cell walls whereas a slower/longer roast preserves the cell structure.
Ben Chen

LeoZ
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#6: Post by LeoZ » replying to coffee_monkey »

unless we roast a la the ethiopians over a flame, or spend $$$$ for direct flame roasters, we are stuck with our various home setups.

expanding on my original question, how much can one extend their home roasting profile to mimic bean lifespan of these setups, without sacrificing flavor?

ive profiled up to 18mins. doesnt seem to help lengthen storage times all that much.

coffee_monkey

#7: Post by coffee_monkey »

You can't ask the roaster to what it is not. That is simple physics. You can attempt to duplicate the roast profile but heat transfer method is still different. It is what it is.

Just roast less and more often.
Ben Chen

LeoZ
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#8: Post by LeoZ »

coffee_monkey wrote:You can't ask the roaster to what it is not. That is simple physics. You can attempt to duplicate the roast profile but heat transfer method is still different. It is what it is.

Just roast less and more often.
expanding on my original question, how much can one extend their home roasting profile to mimic bean lifespan of these setups, without sacrificing flavor?
its a hypothetical question to understand the theory, not a matter of laziness in roasting..

coffee_monkey

#9: Post by coffee_monkey »

My comment was not meant to be a put-down. I own the same roasting rig you have as well as a small direct flame drum roaster. The two roasters are just... different. You can optimize your profile on each and both can produce good roasts, but the roasts will never behave the same. I am not sure if it is possible to make one emulate the other... at least I have not discovered how to yet =)
Ben Chen

LeoZ
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#10: Post by LeoZ »

no offense taken.. i guess we need a user level rating rather than having to explain what knowledge we all have with each post..
im familiar with how sc/to roasting works, but dont understand why drum roasting creates this longer lifespan. in baking, convection is ideal, as moving air helps evenly cook the food. direct heat with grilling seals in flavors, sauteing is quick and dirty.

i guess roasting sort of meets all these categories. maybe hunched over an open flame with a shaking drum is still the ideal method. lol