Un-Cracked (AKA 0% developed) Roasts. Anyone?

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
Aguirre

Postby Aguirre » Jan 10, 2019, 9:44 am

Hello all

Recently, in another thread, at least a couple users have been referencing "un-cracked" roasts and that got me really intrigued. One user mentioned in Europe that's what they're drinking, and posted pictures of extremely light roasts.

I prefer not to judge by the color of roasts in pictures, since cameras white balances and lighting conditions can vary a lot (I can easily make a french roast look like a city roast depending on how I take a picture).

What I'm really interested in knowing is if there are really roasters out there (home and/or commercial) that are dropping the beans BEFORE first crack starts.

I'm not the most experienced roaster. I've been doing it for the past 5 years or so, and had quite a lot of reading and interaction wit other fellow home roasters and a few professional roasters too. Including some folks from Norway, Sweden and Denmark, where light roasts are so much appreciated. And honestly, I've never seen anybody mentioning 0% developed roasts.

I'm even willing to try it out, as I have some pretty good Ethiopian greens (90+ SCAA cupping score) but before doing that I'd like to find some references or recommendation on how to do it the right way.

Anyone, anything to share?

Capac

Postby Capac » Jan 10, 2019, 10:52 am

While I like light roasts, I really dislike underdeveloped roasts, which IMO is something that you'll find way too often when buying light roasted coffee...

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Denis

Postby Denis » Jan 10, 2019, 11:06 am

You misunderstood a bit everything. I posted those photos and talked about uncracked coffee as a metaphor speaking. Why? because I knew people outside Europe are not so aware of this type of roast.

More and more roasters offer filter roasted coffee, separate from traditional espresso roasts. Let's leave omniroast alone. We are refering to light light filter roasts, not the traditional filter roasts.

Filter roast is coffee roasted light, for brewing, and from some graphics with roast profiles they usually drop the coffee after FC (some after 5-10 seconds, others after 1 minute, depending on the roaster type).

The whole intention of that post was because HB has European readers as well, and on the other topic about Forte, there where already some people thinking about converting Vario's to Forte.

Un-cracked coffee is not really so undeveloped, it is just light roast (some beans have entered FC but not all) the density of the beans remain high, you are loosing 11-14% weight after roast.

This is another coffee I opened today, it is a Kenya Filter Roast, but a bit on a higher side. But you cannot describe the taste in words. Yes, it is really hard to pull espresso out of it. You need special tools. I would not waste these on a traditional pump machine.
As you can see not all the beans are cracked.

Image

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EvergreenBuzzBuzz

Postby EvergreenBuzzBuzz » Jan 10, 2019, 11:09 am

Short for me is more like 1:30 DTR but am tempted to try less.

For Artisan users, try a ranking report:


Add a column and subtract FCs from DROP and see your development times. See the Yellow Col. The DTR percentage is already shown in the ranking report.


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EvergreenBuzzBuzz
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[creative nickname]

Postby [creative nickname] » Jan 10, 2019, 11:13 am

Check out this thread for a discussion of what you can get when you drop coffee before first cracks begin. It isn't what you might expect!

Thoughts on Arabic (Gulf) coffee?
LMWDP #435

crunchybean

Postby crunchybean » Jan 10, 2019, 11:55 am

I've seen color as variable of speed and temp and development as a variable of time and temp.

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Denis

Postby Denis » Jan 10, 2019, 12:04 pm

This helps you? Maybe order some coffee from these roasters and see how it is (let it sit for 10 days before trying).

If you search nordic roaster competition then you will find the guys I am talking about.

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Aguirre

Postby Aguirre » Jan 10, 2019, 12:59 pm

Thanks for this. Now it really clarifies. I didn't get it was a metaphor, and maybe here I'd like to bring some insightful information that might bring you a new perspective as well :)

Denis wrote:You misunderstood a bit everything. I posted those photos and talked about uncracked coffee as a metaphor speaking. Why? because I knew people outside Europe are not so aware of this type of roast.

More and more roasters offer filter roasted coffee, separate from traditional espresso roasts. Let's leave omniroast alone. We are refering to light light filter roasts, not the traditional filter roasts.

Filter roast is coffee roasted light, for brewing, and from some graphics with roast profiles they usually drop the coffee after FC (some after 5-10 seconds, others after 1 minute, depending on the roaster type).



I think the idea you have of "people outside of Europe" is probably from 5 or 10 years ago. As of now, you will find A LOT of micro-roasters using the nordic approach here in the US, and as well in other parts of the world where the specialty coffee market is growing.


Denis wrote:The whole intention of that post was because HB has European readers as well, and on the other topic about Forte, there where already some people thinking about converting Vario's to Forte.


This is indeed a very good intention. People should know that some "weak" grinders out there will be put under extreme stress if grinding very lightly roasted coffee

Denis wrote:Un-cracked coffee is not really so undeveloped, it is just light roast (some beans have entered FC but not all) the density of the beans remain high, you are loosing 11-14% weight after roast.


I'm still struggling a bit with the "Un-Cracked" term, but that's fine, I know now what you're talking about. And yes - I'm very familiar with this level of roast (it's how I roast 99% of my coffee).

For Africans I normally target 11%-12% weight loss, charging with high heat and aiming total roast time under 10 min. Very common to drop with 1st crack underway. Of course the roast profile will change depending on the origin, also whether it's natural, washed,etc.

And as mentioned before, this is not at all uncommon outside of Europe. You can go to any hipster coffee shop here in the US, you'll find it everywhere.

Denis wrote:This is another coffee I opened today, it is a Kenya Filter Roast, but a bit on a higher side. But you cannot describe the taste in words. Yes, it is really hard to pull espresso out of it. You need special tools. I would not waste these on a traditional pump machine.
As you can see not all the beans are cracked.
<image>


I think this is another consensus here in the HB community and as well within the specialty coffee community. Pulling espressos from light roasts is hard. I myself have had consistent success in that area after a long learning curve.

I have a very well aligned HG-1 (which haz Mazzer Robur 83mm conical burrs), clamped very well to my countertop. Right now I'm having a delicious Ethiopian Gesha blend, roasted 10 days ago, extraction time is around 45 sec, 19.7g dose in a VST 20g basket. Pre-infusion at 3bar for about 11 sec, then ramp up to 9bar and back to 6bar in the final 10 sec of the shot. Really pleasing in the morning!!! :)

dale_cooper

Postby dale_cooper » Jan 10, 2019, 1:10 pm

Denis wrote:As you can see not all the beans are cracked.


What are you looking at to determine a bean being "cracked"?

Sidenote: Super light roasts are becoming too commonplace and IMO happening far too often - it reminds me of the IPA trend in beer. Everything is a hop bomb with no balance and in general way too much sh**y tasting beer... just like commercial roasters selling super light roast that only brews properly with exact water recipe, exact brewing parameters, grinder, and alot of luck - making it absurd to even sell it to retail customers. And the kicker is that most of their cafe's probably don't even brew it properly. Hmm I sound like Scott Rao now.

Aguirre

Postby Aguirre » replying to dale_cooper » Jan 10, 2019, 1:18 pm

Totally agree! Light roasts are only good in specific circumstances.

EDIT: Yes, you sound like Scott Rao! ;-)