Sous-Vide Coffee Roasting

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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hankua

Postby hankua » Dec 18, 2018, 6:48 am

This Topic has come up before, apparently a Taiwanese roaster from Kaohsiung sent an Ethiopian roast to Coffee Review recently that was prepped pre-roast using sous-vide. ( @60*C for 3 hours) Translation help gratefully accepted :D

https://www.facebook.com/groups/439536826204820?view=permalink&id=1157394427752386

Marcelnl

Postby Marcelnl » Dec 18, 2018, 10:44 am

I'll try that 'esoteric' approach one day soon, as I also wondered a couple of times what it would do if anything...have to thaw the greens anyway.
LMWDP #483

SJM

Postby SJM » Dec 18, 2018, 12:36 pm

Aw heck, I thought you were going to say I could use the sous vide to do the actual roasting.
Now that would be very cool....I mean hot.

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another_jim
Team HB

Postby another_jim » Dec 18, 2018, 1:24 pm

Same here.

Given that the internal pressure of the bean during roasting goes up to about 30 bar, and that the first crack is the bean's moisture coming to a boil, my skeptical side tells me this is some magical/marketing hand waving, with no discernible physical effects, that accompanies an otherwise good roast of a good coffee.

In any case, it's a new entry into my coffee stories catalog: woke origin stories, ancient craftsmen stories, mr. science extraction stories, and now molecular cuisine roasting stories.
Jim Schulman

CwD

Postby CwD » Dec 18, 2018, 2:43 pm

Might be a good way to ensure a consistent greens temperature without having to invest in a room that's always the exact same temperature year round.

crunchybean

Postby crunchybean » replying to CwD » Dec 18, 2018, 2:57 pm

I believe it's more about causing a forced germination for a more flavorful roasted coffee.

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another_jim
Team HB

Postby another_jim » Dec 18, 2018, 4:45 pm

Forced germination? Coffees are patio or kiln dried for days to weeks, and never does a single bean sprout.
Jim Schulman

crunchybean

Postby crunchybean » replying to another_jim » Dec 18, 2018, 5:57 pm

Yea, activating the embryos metabolism. Or it could be used to jump starting the yeasts/microflora. That's my guess.

Marcelnl

Postby Marcelnl » Dec 18, 2018, 6:21 pm

CwD wrote:Might be a good way to ensure a consistent greens temperature without having to invest in a room that's always the exact same temperature year round.


that is my guess too, no voodoo in sous vide just a very even temp distribution within the greens.


I find that green temp has quite an effect on how easy a roast is to control..no scientific data, just a hunch that having a homogenous temp within the bean will help and elevating the start temp at charge likely does not hurt at all. I now nuke the frozen greens but the resulting bean temp across beans is so uneven that temp within a bean also will be very different.
LMWDP #483

seacliff dweller

Postby seacliff dweller » Dec 18, 2018, 7:29 pm

hankua wrote:This Topic has come up before, apparently a Taiwanese roaster from Kaohsiung sent an Ethiopian roast to Coffee Review recently that was prepped pre-roast using sous-vide. ( @60*C for 3 hours) Translation help gratefully accepted :D

https://www.facebook.com/groups/439536826204820?view=permalink&id=1157394427752386

If I remember correctly, I tried this a few years ago with beans vacuum bagged single layer deep so there is enough contact instead of bunched up and that sous vide'd. Surprisingly not much moisture in the bag after done.
I don't think I find it different from just roasting the beans sans sous vide.
But maybe someone out there can demonstrate with their recipe (time and temperature) that the roasted coffee compared to the regular roasted ones are superior.