Sous-Vide Coffee Roasting - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
OldmatefromOZ

Postby OldmatefromOZ » Dec 18, 2018, 7:47 pm

crunchybean wrote:Yea, activating the embryos metabolism. Or it could be used to jump starting the yeasts/microflora. That's my guess.


This was my initial thought as well, 60C is a good temp for activation of lots of interesting things, even though the seeds are dried to beyond germination potential.
I might give it go at some stage, my intuition says it might work better with natural process coffee.

DaveC

Postby DaveC » Dec 18, 2018, 7:53 pm

Pretty much no reaction that benefits coffee and the roasting process takes place at 60C, except for slightly accelerated ageing. However, it might be that starting a roast with the beans already at 60C changes the roast dynamic...far more likely.

Either way, not something I will be doing with my green coffee prior to roasting.

crunchybean

Postby crunchybean » Dec 18, 2018, 10:19 pm

OldmatefromOZ wrote:This was my initial thought as well, 60C is a good temp for activation of lots of interesting things, even though the seeds are dried to beyond germination potential.
I might give it go at some stage, my intuition says it might work better with natural process coffee.


I have reactivated beans before using a sugar and acid solution. I botched the experiment and haven't redone it :/

Not to further any sort of argument but I also think it is a myth to think seeds cannot be germinated. I'm not sure of the specifics but given any packets of seeds to grow...flowers,food, etc. have a shelf life of years. And didn't farmers used to save seeds from previous crops from year to year...I dono I'm no expert.

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hankua

Postby hankua » Dec 19, 2018, 10:09 am

Home roaster trying out Sous-Vide
Image

Beeroclock

Postby Beeroclock » Dec 19, 2018, 11:11 am

I'm a believer- especially as my greens are kept in a cool garage. I warm mine up to around 35c before roasting keeps my turnaround time and temp sensible...

Beeroclock

Postby Beeroclock » Feb 07, 2019, 8:00 am

Hi Hank

Did you come to any conclusions re your experiments with the sous vide?

Thanks Philip

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hankua

Postby hankua » Feb 07, 2019, 8:07 am

Hi Philip!
I don't own a Sous-Vide but was certain there are some home roasters with them. :?

Marcelnl

Postby Marcelnl » Feb 08, 2019, 4:42 pm

I'll give it a try next week, I'll stick a batch of greens in the sous vide for some hours and roast 5 batches or so to ensure the two I'll compare and not that far apart in the curve....nothing scientific but see it as Proof Of Concept testing
LMWDP #483

edpiep

Postby edpiep » Feb 08, 2019, 6:34 pm

crunchybean wrote: And didn't farmers used to save seeds from previous crops from year to year...I dono I'm no expert.


Yes, I have met some that do it, but they were doing it only to grow new plants for the next planting from the healthiest trees of the current crop year. I do not think that they fully dry any of the beans for this purpose to the degree they would for export.

EddyQ

Postby EddyQ » Feb 08, 2019, 8:58 pm

For all-grain beer brewing, there is a mash process which entails holding wet, cracked malted grain at 63-68C for long periods of time. This process allows the seeds enzymes to break down complex sugars (starches) to sugars. Could doing a sous-vide to green coffee be almost doing something similar? The seed is not malted, cracked or wet. So I cannot see it being as efficient.