[PROMO] RoastRite RA-710BF Coffee Roast Analyzer

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
roastrite

Postby roastrite » May 22, 2018, 3:55 am

RoastRite has developed a new, more affordable product for roasters looking to understand roast degree better.
The RoastRite Coffee Roast Analyzer!

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First though, a quick video that shows the comparability between the RA-710BF model, aka RoastRite Coffee Roast Analyzer - BigFoot Edition, and the well-known Agtron M-Basic II. Here we also tested the measurement results consistency of both machines:



Now, introducing the RoastRite RA-710BF! It comes with a special aluminum alloy carrying case that when packed with all accessories, weighs in at only 2kg (4.4lbs), making it lightweight and easy to travel.

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The Tiffany Blue Analyzer uses only 2 AA batteries for on-the-go use. With no warm-up period and no need to calibrate each time you power on, the RA-710 is always ready to go!

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The BigFoot extension works to reduce measurement errors due to uneven sample surfaces and silver-skin, making the final result more stable.

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The BigFoot extension is powered via a provided Micro USB cable which comes with an included wall adaptor. Interchangeable US and UK regulation AC adaptor heads included as well so there's no need to by another travel plug!

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The aluminum level and scrapping cards have the SCA defined Roast levels and names for your easy reference.

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Other assorted accessories: Calibration disc, Cleaning brush, Bean ring

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Testing Coffee Beans



Creating a flat surface without gaps is almost impossible with whole coffee beans. The BigFoot extension works to eliminate this issue with a 9cm diameter sampling area, reducing the potential for a few gaps to affect the end result. Check out a quick demonstration here:




Testing Coffee Grounds


After you have tested your coffee beans you can see the inner roast levels by checking the roast level of your grounds! Just grind your beans to your usual fineness for cupping. Then, as it is easier to get a flat surface with coffee grounds, take the base cup and fill it with a mere 20 grams. Check out some of our other tips for using your RoastRite Analyzer:



More consistent, less waste, easier to use; the RoastRite RA-710BF will be your next best friend! (After your roaster) Why use an Agtron?
http://www.roastrite.com/



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PS added by HB: See Paid placement for promotional threads for the rules of this [PROMO] thread. This thread will remain open through August 22, 2018.

roastrite

Postby roastrite » Jun 13, 2018, 3:58 am

For cupping, the ideal roast level is 63.0, (same as Agtron's "Gourmet").
Reference: https://sca.coffee/research/coffee-standards/

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another_jim
Team HB

Postby another_jim » Jun 13, 2018, 12:57 pm

The size and price are very attractive; bringing it into home roaster territory. I'll bite and let HBers know what I think in a few months.

For those not fully informed, there is a problem comparing the degree of roast for beans from different sources. The problem comes down to this: How can you tell two different roasts of the same bean will taste the same? ...

... Because of the placement of thermometers, and differences in heat transport, roasting profiles between machines are hard to compare. Coffee varieties and different initial moisture levels make weight loss an unreliable measure as well. The de facto standard has become roast color. Testing just the color of the ground coffee fails to distinguish between fast and slow roasts; testing the whole bean and the ground does make the distinction (the bigger the color difference, the faster the roast, and the livelier/rawer the taste). In coffee auctions, where different sample roasters are used; the SCA standard requires all beans must be 58 agtron whole bean and 63 agtron ground. Large roasters with multiple machines also use the whole bean and ground color for quality control (lower numbers for darker roasts -- the agtron number and its alternatives are all monotonic withe the luminance on the HSL scale).
Jim Schulman

User avatar
Almico

Postby Almico » Jun 13, 2018, 11:28 pm

Are you thinking about the Big Foot version, Jim? Any advantage for analyzing beans as opposed to ground coffee?

wayneg1

Postby wayneg1 » Jun 14, 2018, 12:03 am

another_jim wrote:The size and price are very attractive; bringing it into home roaster territory. I'll bite and let HBers know what I think in a few months.

For those not fully informed, there is a problem comparing the degree of roast for beans from different sources. The problem comes down to this: How can you tell two different roasts of the same bean will taste the same? ...

... Because of the placement of thermometers, and differences in heat transport, roasting profiles between machines are hard to compare. Coffee varieties and different initial moisture levels make weight loss an unreliable measure as well. The de facto standard has become roast color. Testing just the color of the ground coffee fails to distinguish between fast and slow roasts; testing the whole bean and the ground does make the distinction (the bigger the color difference, the faster the roast, and the livelier/rawer the taste). In coffee auctions, where different sample roasters are used; the SCA standard requires all beans must be 58 agtron whole bean and 63 agtron ground. Large roasters with multiple machines also use the whole bean and ground color for quality control (lower numbers for darker roasts -- the agtron number and its alternatives are all monotonic withe the luminance on the HSL scale).



Jim, Looking forward to hearing your feedback on this. I may be a player as well. I'm intrigued by the ability to test whole bean and ground with this machine. Cheers.

dale_cooper

Postby dale_cooper » Jun 14, 2018, 12:16 am

I wish it were cheaper - $900 is far from "home roaster" territory - thats as much or more than many home roasters lol.

roastrite

Postby roastrite » Jun 21, 2018, 11:24 pm

Thanks @Jim for the great exposition on the significance of roast color and we eagerly await your thoughts on our machine!

Many of our users tell us that they use their units as a quality control method or as a control to test other variables. In larger roasteries this generally seems to be a way to make sure that each batch of a certain roast type falls within the same range so there is little/no difference between batches. In some of our customers, usage seems to be more towards refining other variables used in their roasting process - i.e. changing charge times and cooling periods.

There is even a possibility of looking at the quality of green coffee. To be honest, I'm not sure that there is a identifiable standard color shift in green coffee as it ages. It may be necessary to first establish what the original color value is and then you can track the color shift as it loses freshness.

@Almico Analyzing just the beans is much the same as analyzing just the grounds. The really important information comes from when you compare the two. They can tell you about the roast speed and development based on the differences in color. I like to think of how a steak is cooked sometimes as a comparison; you can see the outer sear but only after you cut it open can you see if the center is a nice pink, raw, or overdone.

User avatar
another_jim
Team HB

Postby another_jim » Jun 22, 2018, 1:05 am

I received the Roastrite a few days ago. The people at Roastrite were very helpful, and delivery was prompt. If you are in the US and interested, place orders with their US distributor.

My main reason for ordering is not quality control on roasts, but as a primary measuring tool for my distinctiveness project. I want to know what kind of roasts will make two coffees from the same region maximally distinctive. This raises a bunch of questions: The 58/63 Agtron gourmet standard is designed to show up defects; but is it best for distinctiveness? What aspects of the roast profile are captured by the two Agtron measures, or the single one for ground coffee? How good are Agtron measures for comparing degree of roast from different roasting styles and roasting machines?

Once I get organized, I'll start a bench thread to answer these questions about Agtron measures in general, and the Roastrite in particular.
Jim Schulman

User avatar
Almico

Postby Almico » Jun 22, 2018, 8:47 am

roastrite wrote:@Almico Analyzing just the beans is much the same as analyzing just the grounds. The really important information comes from when you compare the two. They can tell you about the roast speed and development based on the differences in color. I like to think of how a steak is cooked sometimes as a comparison; you can see the outer sear but only after you cut it open can you see if the center is a nice pink, raw, or overdone.


How so?

I use a fluid bed roaster, so the outer shells are significantly lighter than the inner bean, and much lighter than the old "conduction" roaster that I cut my teeth on.

So to me, the outside doesn't really tell me anything and I never use it as a guide to roast level. I pretty much go by roast profile and final time/temp. Then the taste tells me what I need to know. But it would be nice to have numbers to validate my palette. I'm just not sure I need to invest the other $300 for the Big Foot version. Is it available later if I purchase the base model now?

Also, I'm not far from North Brunswick, NJ. Does Acronova Technology welcome walk-ins and have demos there to try?