Quest M3 Mods - Page 31

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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TomC
Team HB

#301: Post by TomC »

So a bit of an update after getting more comfortable with the mods I've done. I clearly notice that capacity has increased. The roaster now seems to like at minimum 250g. I really like having the rear vanes for the exhaust completely cut off. I think it will lower the frequency of deep cleaning just a tad and the big bonus is when setting up the Quest for the drying phase, it's very easy to gauge that bare hint of a trickle of airflow coming out the back, against my hand, which helps me set the exact starting airflow I want.

Haven't lost any responsiveness, it seems easier to steer and perhaps a tiny bit less lag, since changing convective flow has a quicker effect on the coffee.

I'm slightly rearranging how I go about any given profile in light of these mods but they certainly seem to yield better results. I'm getting a more even roast without having concerns about over developing the bean surface. Proof in the pudding is taking coffees much further past first crack than before and still having nice light to caramel colored chaff. I'm pretty happy with it as it stands now.

Zanderfy

#302: Post by Zanderfy »

Deleted.

ira
Supporter ♡

#303: Post by ira »

AssafL wrote:I don't remember. I keep a few types of the same Allen keys from a few vendors for this specific reason. Sometimes the awful Sears is the best fit. Sometimes the expensive Wiha or the odd Wera or the Gorilla will be better.
We buy 6-32 x 1/4 set screws 10,000 at a time and I install them in knobs with a slightly worn hex driver. The variation in size of the hex in the set screws is quite dramatic. Not so obvious with a new key, but with the worn one, about 1 out of every few hundred the hex opening is so large the driver turns in the hex if the screw encounters any resistance.

Ira

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FotonDrv

#304: Post by FotonDrv »

TomC wrote:So a bit of an update after getting more comfortable with the mods I've done. I clearly notice that capacity has increased. The roaster now seems to like at minimum 250g. I really like having the rear vanes for the exhaust completely cut off. I think it will lower the frequency of deep cleaning just a tad and the big bonus is when setting up the Quest for the drying phase, it's very easy to gauge that bare hint of a trickle of airflow coming out the back, against my hand, which helps me set the exact starting airflow I want.

Haven't lost any responsiveness, it seems easier to steer and perhaps a tiny bit less lag, since changing convective flow has a quicker effect on the coffee.

I'm slightly rearranging how I go about any given profile in light of these mods but they certainly seem to yield better results. I'm getting a more even roast without having concerns about over developing the bean surface. Proof in the pudding is taking coffees much further past first crack than before and still having nice light to caramel colored chaff. I'm pretty happy with it as it stands now.
+1, although I have never gone as high as 250g. I do routinely roast 210g batches, back to back.
That Light at the End of the Tunnel is actually a train

User avatar
AssafL

#305: Post by AssafL »

225gr.

TomC - you hit the nail on the head - less scorching - and yet quicker roasts... Hence a more forgiving roaster...
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

Goldensncoffee

#306: Post by Goldensncoffee »

TomC wrote:So a bit of an update after getting more comfortable with the mods I've done. I clearly notice that capacity has increased. The roaster now seems to like at minimum 250g. I really like having the rear vanes for the exhaust completely cut off. I think it will lower the frequency of deep cleaning just a tad and the big bonus is when setting up the Quest for the drying phase, it's very easy to gauge that bare hint of a trickle of airflow coming out the back, against my hand, which helps me set the exact starting airflow I want.

Haven't lost any responsiveness, it seems easier to steer and perhaps a tiny bit less lag, since changing convective flow has a quicker effect on the coffee.

I'm slightly rearranging how I go about any given profile in light of these mods but they certainly seem to yield better results. I'm getting a more even roast without having concerns about over developing the bean surface. Proof in the pudding is taking coffees much further past first crack than before and still having nice light to caramel colored chaff. I'm pretty happy with it as it stands now.
I just roasted about 4 lbs this morning, playing around with the new drum and intake pipe mod. I believe our roasters are set up the same, minus the exhaust vane mod. This feels like a completely different roaster to me. I feel like responds so much faster to any changes I make in airflow or heat. I can't get over how gorgeous the beans look and how light colored the chaff is in the collector. I sampled a roast of Costa Rica La Patricia where I took it to 410F with a 5min dry and wow....compared to my previous roasts of this bean it is mind blowing. Crisp clear flavors, and way more sweetness.

I have a question though. Ive been playing around with 227g batch sizes. My fan is always on so I leave the front chute open during the drying phase. It seems like every roast is taking until about 5:00-5:20 EOD. I charge right after a previous roast is done (around 400F) and leave the amps at 8 (just a little more than half way on the meter). I normally shoot for a little quicker dry time but not experienced enough to tell if these longer dry times I'm getting are a good or bad thing. Any insight you may have?

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TomC
Team HB

#307: Post by TomC »

Goldensncoffee wrote: I have a question though. Ive been playing around with 227g batch sizes. My fan is always on so I leave the front chute open during the drying phase. It seems like every roast is taking until about 5:00-5:20 EOD. I charge right after a previous roast is done (around 400F) and leave the amps at 8 (just a little more than half way on the meter). I normally shoot for a little quicker dry time but not experienced enough to tell if these longer dry times I'm getting are a good or bad thing. Any insight you may have?

I'm always hesitant to recommend anything as an absolute. You just have to follow your coffee and how it brews up. I do feel that because the changes done to the heat/airflow dynamics, that I'm less fearful of the drying phase creating any scorched notes on the bean surface. I feel that the greens dry more like they do in my large gasser and other commercial drum roasters. So, having less concern about the previously noted higher conductive heat transfer, I feel that I can extend drying without fear of scorched notes. The OEM design with it's higher conductive nature meant drying was a bit more of a challenge, you could more easily get a bean surface that was far ahead of the bean internals in terms of temp.

Goldensncoffee

#308: Post by Goldensncoffee »

I think the drum certainly does make the roast resistant to scorching during the drying phase. I actually roasted some washed Honduras La Torre and charged at 10a. (400F on the bean probe). I pulled samples during drying and there was zero scorching. I never charge at this high of an amperage as I think the stock drum would have caused some scorching. I roasted this bean about 15secs into 2C and its just beautiful. Ive never roasted into this range before and had a bean look like this. I will have to play around more with higher charge temps and/or higher charge amperage settings.

I'm still up in the air as to whether or not to cut the resistor so I have full control over the fan. I think it may be beneficial for heat retention in the drum to be able to keep the trap doors shut and just trickle the fan.

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AssafL

#309: Post by AssafL »

I find that I usually aim for lower drop temps after the mod. When the roaster was more conductive - I would never drop before I got to 215 or so (in C - I apologize) - or I'd get underdevelopment.

With the drilled drum, I can drop at 208-212C and even less - and be well developed.
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

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FotonDrv

#310: Post by FotonDrv » replying to AssafL »

200C drop is what I have been using but it is dependent on charge weight and bean type.
That Light at the End of the Tunnel is actually a train