A Place To Share Artisan Logs

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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fishll

#1: Post by fishll »

Hey all,

I am currently a student learning web-based development and as an avid coffee roaster and long time home barista, I've been thinking of ways to merge these passions. I am working on building an open-source website that would be all about sharing roast logs. Once a new user signs up they can upload their roast log in a JSON format. From there you would be able to browse other roasts seeing not just the curve but other pertinent info such as total roast time, development time... and if you liked the roast, you could download the JSON file and load it into Artisan as a background curve.

So I would love to hear your thoughts on this as far as features that would be beneficial to the community or specific points of data that you would look for if you were browsing for a 'good' roast. Again this is all about sharing information and hopefully helping everyone to roast better coffee.

With that being said, I am looking to initially populate the database with real data, this data would be removed before the site goes to production and is only for testing purposes. But if you care to help, please reach out to me so I can receive a few of your roasts in the JSON format. This can easily be done in Artisan by navigating to File > Export > Artisan JSON

Thank you!

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CarefreeBuzzBuzz
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#2: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

How are you going to index/tag them? Info in the .json files like drop temp?

The one thing that many people don't do is completely fill out the Roast Properties dialog so you may be lacking the basic bean name or density etc. Maybe something like this might get more people interested.

What more can you tell us?
CarefreeBuzzBuzz
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SJM

#3: Post by SJM »

There used to be a place.
I think it was called ArtisanCoffeeAlliance ???
I don't know what happened to it, but maybe someone who does could give you some indication as to how well it worked out.

EddyQ

#4: Post by EddyQ »

It would be cool to have a web tool where we all could share profiles for a particular bean. But the tool would need a lot more input than simply the Artisan file. It would need cupping notes, maybe notes on espressos and how the flavor might change with time. Basically more data the better. And then, with user inputs, could make adjustments and plot the data to his/her liking. Export from tool would be helpful.

Another challenge would be data taken other than BT and ET. Like input air, gas and air settings and drum temps.
Like I said, more data the better.

As you probably already know, matching flavor profiles on my machine isn't likely going to match someone else even if cupping tastes similar. So simply a tool that plots everyone's profile on top of each other's isn't very useful.

false1001
Supporter ♡

#5: Post by false1001 »

I've been running a local webserver to backup my RoasTime roasts for a while now, and I have an unfinished branch that supports Artisan logs. It would be relatively easy to get it up and running in a hosted manner, although I'd have to create a user system (for the 10,000th time) and a frontend (where backend projects go to die).

I will say though, in my past experience with other hobbies and just software in general, these sorts of repositories don't work well "open sourced". The Artisan model works well because there's little to no overhead costs, but when hosting repositories of data you eventually need a "curator" to dictate the experience and guide the community as well as someone to shoulder the costs if it ever gets popular. It's all fun and games hosting a popular community project until your hosting bill goes from $20/month to $200/month because you exceeded, say, bandwidth circuit breakers.

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zeece
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#6: Post by zeece »

false1001 wrote:The Artisan model works well because there's little to no overhead costs
That is a very unfair comment. There are considerable overhead costs to develop, maintain, and support Artisan. The "model" of Artisan is funded by contributions from users. Without them there could be no future for Artisan.

cushdan

#7: Post by cushdan »

I think you guys are violently agreeing :D