My "new" 5kg Turkish roaster has arrived - Page 15

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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TomC
Team HB

Postby TomC » Jan 11, 2019, 2:34 am

I'd try to repeat the same charge temp, same bean load, leave your damper open at 50-70%. If you're not sailing thru FC before your previous 10 minute mark, it might be inadequate BTU. Your ET held well throughout, so I wouldn't immediately turn my attention to the burners, from that profile at least.

If your repeat profile with dampers opened more (don't get fancy, keep it simple and consistent), give you more sag in your ET and no significant change in roast finish times, then it's likely underpowered.

I'm not a fan of Turkish roasters, I got rid of mine after a few years of fiddling and never being satisfied with them. By and large, they're very spotty in terms of build quality. But I have no experience with this manufacturer, so for all I know, this one might be built better.

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Almico

Postby Almico » Jan 11, 2019, 6:39 am

Thanks, Tom. I tried all kinds of air settings and nothing boosted the heat. It has to be the nozzles. The mfg told me that the max BTU for this roaster is 75,000. With #55 jets the max BTU IS 18.9K X 3 nozzles = 56K BTU. I need 25K per nozzle, so a #53 drill instead of the #55 that I used should do the trick. Hard to believe .0075" can make a 25% difference in BTU, but it seems so. I'm tempted to go up to a 1/16" bit for almost 82K BTU, but let's try and keep it in spec first.

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User avatar
Clint Orchuk

Postby Clint Orchuk » Jan 11, 2019, 2:43 pm

~18000 BTU on a 5 kilo roaster is vastly under powered. Triple that sounds like it would be in the ballpark. It's definitely what's causing the long roasts with higher charge loads and the inability to maintain a consistent delta BT curve.

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Almico

Postby Almico » replying to Clint Orchuk » Jan 11, 2019, 3:14 pm

I think it's 18000 BTU per nozzle? So with 3 nozzles I have 55000 total. Still not enough, but not as bad as 18000 :shock: I can't wait to get home and drill out some orifices!

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Almico

Postby Almico » Jan 12, 2019, 12:33 am

Orifices opened up. Just a hint of orange tips:

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Making progress.

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Still a little saggy, but this is a very similar espresso profile to what I would use on the fluid bed. Should be a good comparison.

Dips in the ET are from pulling the trier.

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Almico

Postby Almico » Jan 13, 2019, 1:27 am

More roasting tonight.Mixed results. Nice to know my Sumatra still has its patented "W" dip & flick. Not sure how to get rid of it on this roaster yet.

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One thing I have to fix: the needle valve and gauge have to be downstream of the control valve. I can't turn the gas way down/off without the pilot light going out. Sometimes I get the heat so low it shuts off by mistake and then I have to scramble getting everything lit up again at the most critical time in a roast. Not fun. Neither will it be fun moving everything around to make it fit, but it has to be done.

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There is no much room to the right:

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Chert

Postby Chert » Jan 13, 2019, 1:40 am

The positions just switch and for that you may need longer lead and thermocouple wires, right?

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Almico

Postby Almico » replying to Chert » Jan 13, 2019, 10:24 am

I can drill some holes and remount the control valve an inch or two to the left. I'm hoping I have enough slack in the wires and pilot gas line. If not I may need to leave it where it is an create a convoluted piping loop to make room.

OldNuc

Postby OldNuc » Jan 13, 2019, 11:10 am

I would opt for the convoluted piping scheme. Gas direct into control valve and at the outlet come out with a "U" configuration to mount needle valve and gauge under or in front of gas valve then use a longer flex connector to get back to the burners.

User avatar
Almico

Postby Almico » Jan 13, 2019, 12:44 pm

TomC wrote:I'd try to repeat the same charge temp, same bean load, leave your damper open at 50-70%. If you're not sailing thru FC before your previous 10 minute mark, it might be inadequate BTU. Your ET held well throughout, so I wouldn't immediately turn my attention to the burners, from that profile at least.

If your repeat profile with dampers opened more (don't get fancy, keep it simple and consistent), give you more sag in your ET and no significant change in roast finish times, then it's likely underpowered.

I'm not a fan of Turkish roasters, I got rid of mine after a few years of fiddling and never being satisfied with them. By and large, they're very spotty in terms of build quality. But I have no experience with this manufacturer, so for all I know, this one might be built better.


I tried 5 roasts last night using this advice. I did the cigarette lighter test for airflow. Set it and forgot it. 75oz charges at <400*F. I did nothing to try and mitigate the fluctuations for now.

Here are the roasts in order:

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And my favorite:

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I roasted these for retail bags and not bar brew, but I kept enough to be able to cup them this morning.

The Sumatra was surprisingly good. Less black pepper, no bitterness whatsoever, very sweet with a distinct honey dew finish. I never got that before in 3 years roasting this coffee. It's exciting to think where this coffee can go when I tame the "W" dip.

The Ethiopia is simply outstanding. Big blueberry bomb, no astringency, sweet and complex with more body than I am used to with this coffee. Just black, it sipped like a soft drink.

The Costa Rica was also very nice. Juicy, sweet and cocoa-y. Very balanced.

I have yet to cup the Brazil. I'm a bit caffeinated at the moment.

My takeaway is that, given the squirreliness of these roasts, I'm surprised how juicy all of them are. With my air roaster I fight dryness and astringency and struggle for sweetness. With this roaster both seem to come easily with more margin for error in the curves. The jury is still out, but it looks this drum roasting thing might be worth the PITA that it is. That's the only disappointment so far.