Mill City vs Buckeye BC Roasters

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
rkern
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Postby rkern » Aug 06, 2017, 5:56 pm

Has anyone used a roaster from Buckeye Roasters? I've heard great results from Mill City, and wanted to compare the Mill City TJ-066-Gas and the Buckeye BC-1.

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Balthazar_B
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Postby Balthazar_B » Aug 06, 2017, 6:21 pm

Keno has posted extensively on Buckeye roasters, particularly on his BC-600 (which is the original name for what's now the BC-2). I think he took at look at the BC-300 -- equivalent to the BC-1 -- as well.
- John

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jerbear00
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Postby jerbear00 » Aug 06, 2017, 8:20 pm

That is a hard question to answer. Doubt anyone can compare as most people only have 1 roaster.

My experience TJ-067: I have roasted 750gm batches for the past I don't know maybe 5years ... I don't recall having to fix anything or having any problems. So maintenance and longevity seem great so far.

Good luck! You won't look back if you pull the trigger. So much fun

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drgary
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Postby drgary » Aug 06, 2017, 8:24 pm

I have a North TJ-067 and have seen Ken's roaster. Both are excellent machines, and I don't think you would go wrong ordering either one. The North (aka Mill City) seems more massive and a bit cruder, but there have been many improvements since mine. I wouldn't trade my North for Ken's roaster because I like how much mine is overbuilt, and metal mass = temperature momentum.
Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

rkern
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Postby rkern » Aug 06, 2017, 10:43 pm

Balthazar_B wrote:Keno has posted extensively on Buckeye roasters, particularly on his BC-600 (which is the original name for what's now the BC-2). I think he took at look at the BC-300 -- equivalent to the BC-1 -- as well.

I've read this.

drgary wrote:I wouldn't trade my North for Ken's roaster because I like how much mine is overbuilt, and metal mass = temperature momentum.

That's good to hear.

Thanks everyone for your responses.

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turtle
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Postby turtle » Aug 07, 2017, 8:34 am

For a 1 lb (half kilo) roaster you want close to 1000 lb in machine weight as you do not want great temp fluctuation while roasting (add beans heat drops for too long).

Weight of roasting chamber components equal mass which equal even roasting.

You're not going to find any direct comparison from users of roasters as most people only have one roaster of any given size.

SO....

If I were going to make any suggestions, I would suggest that you look at the weight of each machine and base your choice on that factor since you can't really know what differences there will be until you start using one.
Mick - Drinking in life one cup at a time
I'd rather be roasting coffee

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Balthazar_B
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Postby Balthazar_B » Aug 07, 2017, 8:44 am

turtle wrote:For a 1 lb (half kilo) roaster you want close to 1000 lb in machine weight as you do not want great temp fluctuation while roasting (add beans heat drops for too long).


Just checking on if you truly meant 1000 lb in machine weight. The TJ-066-G, one of the heavier, well-regarded machines in its class/capacity, is about 200 lb.

Your point about thermal stability is well-taken, and others more experienced with roasting will have more informed thoughts than I, but it seems to me there are a lot of factors at work here, including drum mass (and the right balance between mass and conductivity), heating element power, and control of air flow.
- John

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drgary
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Postby drgary » Aug 07, 2017, 9:45 am

Here's one anecdote that demonstrates thermal stability. My TJ-067 runs on propane. Mid-roast my propane tank ran out. I took 5 minutes to disconnect the tank, run to the barbecue, disconnect its tank, bring that over, connect it and restart. There was enough momentum in the roast that the coffee was still drinkable. My machine has a perforated drum, so although there may be decent mass to it, it's not like those with solid cast-iron drums. I believe the new Mill City roasters have double layer drums now.
Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

amh0001
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Postby amh0001 » Aug 07, 2017, 11:57 am

I recently was eyeballing both of these machines as well.

It was hard to find any info to compare the two. LIke a spec sheet to view side by side.

I may be wrong, but if my memory serves right, the north has variable drum speed, the bc doesn't. The North has a bean prob in the door that sits lower for lower batch sizes. I think the North weighs more. I think the North has a needle valve for gas instead of ball. The North is backed by a bigger company for customer service, but with all the said the north costs a lot more at $3500.

*************I may be wrong***********

hope that helps.

rkern
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Postby rkern » Aug 07, 2017, 12:19 pm

amh0001 wrote:I recently was eyeballing both of these machines as well.

The North has a bean prob in the door that sits lower for lower batch sizes. I think the North weighs more. I think the North has a needle valve for gas instead of ball.


Great to know. I can do some research on these type of things.

amh0001 wrote:but with all the said the north costs a lot more at $3500.


This is the reason I brought this question up.

 
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