How do you roast high grown coffee?

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
genecounts

Postby genecounts » May 14, 2018, 9:37 am

I ask because Ian Pico, newly crowned US Roasting Champion, just stated that with a high density bean he spends more time in the drying phase.
I would love to have someone expand on this. He says before the world roasting championships he plans to spend a lot of time in the lab roasting, cupping, and logging specific bean densities for a wide spectrum of beans.

I have five pounds of Ecuador Finca La Papaya grown up to 2300 meters. Have missed the sweet spot twice and want to study some before committing another roast.

Maybe some of you already have some ideas or have already charted such?

EvergreenBuzzBuzz

Postby EvergreenBuzzBuzz » May 14, 2018, 10:15 am

How are you controlling your Gene Cafe in the first place? What options are you proposing. Some how you have to take out heat at the start right?

Also you may want to change the title of the thread to High Grown as some won't know what HG is.
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Almico

Postby Almico » May 14, 2018, 2:20 pm

genecounts wrote:I have five pounds of Ecuador Finca La Papaya grown up to 2300 meters. Have missed the sweet spot twice and want to study some before committing another roast.


I have the same coffee and haven't got a good roast out of it yet.

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Chert

Postby Chert » May 14, 2018, 5:08 pm

On the Cafe Imports website, I see listings for 2016 crop.

Did you get yours from Roastmasters 2017 crop?

Neither has any data about bean density. I don't see this tip from the Roastmaster's listing helping a lot: "This is a high grown, dense bean that will withstand lighter and darker roasting. To retain the dryness it is recommended to pull before 2nd crack, but the bean lends itself to darker roasts to highlight the bold character of the coffee."

What is the approach for high grown, dense bean generally? Much heat at the outset, generally, right? And probably a tendency to vigorous heat absorbing first crack, ie "crashy".

Looking at a Crown analysis of a high grown coffee, may suggest some pointers for a small roaster.

CraigF

Postby CraigF » May 14, 2018, 8:41 pm

That Ecuador is a strange roasting coffee IMO. I have only done 2 roasts with it so far. Couple observations, roasting on my Huky (with sold drum):

- This coffee does not act like a dense coffee in the roaster to me. Most dense coffees seem to be able to take aggressive heat during the drying phase and still takes 5-6 minutes until reaching DE...this one seems to want to run away from me if I apply aggressive heat early. I have been shooting for a 5:00+ minute target, but so far both roasts hit DE in about 4:30. In my second attempt, I applied moderate heat after charge, and still hit DE early and found myself trying to slow the roast down the rest of the way.

- Uneven roast - both of my attempts generated uneven roasts. Coffee resembles my whirley-pop roasting days, not something that came out of my Huky. Seems to me there are at least 2 different beans mixed together as they act very differently from each other. I would say 2/3rds are one variety, and 1/3 is something else.

So while the roasts had me scratching my head, in the cup was surprisingly not terrible. I prefer the pour over vs. the espresso with this one.

If you figure this Ecuador coffee out please post your recipe...I have another 3 pounds to go!

genecounts

Postby genecounts » May 15, 2018, 10:59 am

Chert posted:

"Neither has any data about bean density. I don't see this tip from the Roastmaster's listing helping a lot: "This is a high grown, dense bean that will withstand lighter and darker roasting. To retain the dryness it is recommended to pull before 2nd crack, but the bean lends itself to darker roasts to highlight the bold character of the coffee."

What is the approach for high grown, dense bean generally? Much heat at the outset, generally, right? And probably a tendency to vigorous heat absorbing first crack, ie "crashy".

Looking at a Crown analysis of a high grown coffee, may suggest some pointers for a small roaster."


Checking out the Crown Analysis results in the exact opposite of what Ian recently suggests. The experiment with a Probatina in the Crown analysis and another 50 gram roaster concludes high heat initially to hurry through the Drying Phase. Ian wants to slow things down during Drying.

These contradictions certainly don't help. This coffee is the most difficult to roast in my 25 years of roasting.

With my perf drum Huky heat and air at zero for first minute means 6:30 for drying phase. Right on what Ian is suggesting. Heat on max and air moderate up to first crack when heat is lowered and fan increased to avoid the flick. Drop before first crack end for pourover and to verge of second crack for espresso.

If anyone has suggestions I'm all ears. Like Craig says below this roast has me scratching my head.

pcofftenyo

Postby pcofftenyo » May 15, 2018, 3:44 pm

What sort of temps are you Huky guys charging at? I've had to fiddle with both that and charge size to get a bean nailed down.

Also, I am usually ticked to receive a blended lot when I'm not expecting it, especially if it doesn't roast evenly.

genecounts

Postby genecounts » May 15, 2018, 8:34 pm

I try to charge somewhere in vicinity of 250=280F. Again no heat nor fan for first minute to minute and half.

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GC7

Postby GC7 » May 16, 2018, 1:58 pm

I had last year's crop from Roastmasters. I was underwhelmed as I posted previously. Nothing I did gave me a cup that was worthy of the price and the bother. I passed on it this year.

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drgary
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Postby drgary » May 17, 2018, 1:35 am

High temp charge to drive heat into the bean, then long soak? Just a thought.
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