Ethiopia DP Gr. 1 Yirga Cheffe Aricha-Current crop at Sweet Maria's

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
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TomC
Team HB

#1: Post by TomC » May 29, 2014, 8:15 pm

For a general look at this incredible natural processed Ethiopian that recently landed at Sweet Maria's, I thought I'd share this profile and some thoughts about the coffee. It easily has the Gedeo Worka beat for intense berry juice flavor and sweetness. I just brewed a sample of what I roasted last night, and I expect it to be even better tomorrow.

Anyways, the only reason for the separate thread was by request about this coffee. I had actually wanted to choose this coffee for June's RLT, but I got the impression from Dan that it's not going to last very long and there might be supply issues, mainly, it won't be available in a few weeks due to it's quality/value (practically a 94 point coffee in their cupping).

I generally approach all naturals with a lower ET for my charge. I also tend to charge just a tad higher in weight and take a bit more time on the roast, anecdotally, I seem to find that larger charges of DP coffees seem to do better when (specific to my Quest) the bean to bean heat transfer is increased relative to the bean to drum. I end up getting better development without risk of loosing delicate fruits and acids. It seems to tone down some of the tannic tea like notes common to a lot of Ethiopian coffees as well. Anyways, for what its worth here's my first profile on it. I'll likely be buying more, this coffee is definitely a winner in my mind.

Image

SAB

#2: Post by SAB » May 29, 2014, 9:20 pm

by TomC

I generally approach all naturals with a lower ET for my charge. I also tend to charge just a tad higher in weight and take a bit more time on the roast, anecdotally, I seem to find that larger charges of DP coffees seem to do better when (specific to my Quest) the bean to bean heat transfer is increased relative to the bean to drum. I end up getting better development without risk of loosing delicate fruits and acids. It seems to tone down some of the tannic tea like notes common to a lot of Ethiopian coffees as well. Anyways, for what its worth here's my first profile on it. I'll likely be buying more, this coffee is definitely a winner in my mind.
I'm fascinated by this, Tom. It looks like you charge about 20% higher by weight for naturals. I use a hg/bm and had gotten some flatness in my roasts, that turned out to be because I was charging too much weight. But it looks like I could have well drifted up because of a couple of very good tasting roasts of dp coffee. I'm still playing with charge weights, but 400 gms seems too high, and 200 gms is a bit low. But it is EXTREMELY helpful to know that DPs need a bit more weight!

I'll look forward to getting my coffee in about a week. It's a long way from California to Alabama!

Will you plan to roast any of this for espresso? If so, How will you plan your approach? Do you have general guidelines for an Ethiopian DP, or will it all depend on what you find with your lighter roasts?

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TomC
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#3: Post by TomC » May 29, 2014, 9:40 pm

Like I mentioned in my first post, some things are relative to the particular roaster. You can't cut and paste exact things from something like a Quest to a dog bowl or bread machine, it's just not that simple. You have to learn your system well enough and how your coffee responds to different changes.

I charge slightly higher weights because I feel the bean to bean heat transfer is gentler on the natural processed coffee that has a disproportionate amount of sugars and oils closer to the surface of the bean, where they're at greater risk of scorching or picking up too much development specifically on my Quest. So, by going slower with a slightly lower ET, I can protect those sugars and other compounds that are being developed. And like I said, the higher charge weight is mostly anecdotal, but seems to reduce tannin and tea or sour lemon notes without allowing the delicate acidity to be harmed if I were to charge the same weight, and just lower the ET and stretch out the roast. That seems to lead to slightly muted acidity and a clipping of flavor highlights, so by upping the charge weight, I believe the way my beans transfer heat works better. You have to see a Quest in action to appreciate what I'm talking about, the beans aren't being thrown and agitated like hornets in a typical drum roaster, they're touching each other a great deal more.

I can use a profile like this for delicious espresso. I don't use a standardized profile for espresso, it's too bean specific and needs many different variables.

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Almico
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#4: Post by Almico » May 30, 2014, 10:00 am

You talked me into it Tom. I just ordered 5lbs. I love the Danch Meng from April, but I'm running out and want to try another Ethiopian.

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cimarronEric
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#5: Post by cimarronEric » May 30, 2014, 10:24 am

Thank you for the post, Tom. I wish I didn't have to cover the shop so I could roast a batch today. Tomorrow...
Cimarron Coffee Roasters
www.cimarronroasters.com

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TomC
Team HB

#6: Post by TomC » May 30, 2014, 12:35 pm

I just bought 5 more myself. Get it while it lasts.

SAB

#7: Post by SAB » May 30, 2014, 1:22 pm

Tom, thanks for your insightful and thoughtful explanations. Perhaps in my exuberance, I overstated some issues carelessly.

It's precisely your explanation of how and why you approached your roast that make it valuable to roasters with a bit less experience. I understand that my primitive heat gun/bread machine is a far different animal than your Quest roaster, but much of this learning is trying to identify the essential elements of roasting that perhaps cross all platforms.

In my bread machine, my beans spend a lot of time together as well, more so than in a typical drum, and certainly more than in my previous fluid bed roaster. Learning how that specifically affects my roasts, along with the variables over which I have control (eg profile, air flow, heat input, etc), is a long, but enjoyable process. Often, a post here at HB may have little relevance to my situation, but every once in a while, when another's insight helps explain personal experience, then i may be able to bypass a few steps in the learning process, or, at the very least, have a relevant framework that allows me to expand my knowledge base in a meaningful way.

Until this thread, I was unaware of the more superficial sugars and oils on dry processed beans. Your passing comment about changing charge weight and ET, along with your explanation as to why, has helped provide insight into things I should look for and be aware of in my own roasting.
TomC wrote:
I can use a profile like this for delicious espresso. I don't use a standardized profile for espresso, it's too bean specific and needs many different variables.
Do you PREFER light roasts for espresso? Or again, bean specific.

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drgary
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#8: Post by drgary » May 30, 2014, 1:42 pm

Thanks for this, Tom. I'm getting ready to roast again and just ordered 10 lbs of this special lot. :D
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

seacliff dweller

#9: Post by seacliff dweller » May 30, 2014, 1:47 pm

Tom,
Another natural just got posted - Yirga cheffe Conga 93.1.
I bought 20#s of the Aricha for espresso even though it was not recommended for espresso. I did my first roasting Wednesday and thought it was great!
Originally I thought it was due to the brightness, but both Aricha and Conga have 9s for brightness but Conga is suitable for SO.
So my question is: what really determines whether a bean is suitable for espresso or not. I am confused.

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TomC
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#10: Post by TomC » May 30, 2014, 1:50 pm

SAB wrote:Tom, thanks for your insightful and thoughtful explanations. Perhaps in my exuberance, I overstated some issues carelessly.
That's what this forum is all about. Your welcome. Just remember, you need to draw the map yourself, we'll only be able to point out guideposts.
SAB wrote: Until this thread, I was unaware of the more superficial sugars and oils on dry processed beans. Your passing comment about changing charge weight and ET, along with your explanation as to why, has helped provide insight into things I should look for and be aware of in my own roasting.
It's part of the effect from the pulp drying on the pergamino, some higher concentrations of sugars and other compounds are closer to the surface of the bean. You can protect these by roasting with lower ET's than any typical high grown, dense, washed bean.

SAB wrote: Do you PREFER light roasts for espresso? Or again, bean specific.
I prefer sweet espresso that doesn't hide cultivar under heavy roast. But sweet is of ultimate importance and my main consideration. If I can't make a coffee sweetly, I don't use it as espresso. It's clearly bean specific. Any cupping roast that cools sweetly can be used for espresso, some better than others.