Best blend for good espresso

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
Enjazlines

#1: Post by Enjazlines » Sep 18, 2018, 6:31 am

ImageImageImageImageImageImage Hello everyone
I am really happy and grateful to find this great website and really great and active users

I'm in coffee business since long time
But I don't have my own brand name
I am looking to find good blend of espresso Italian style not 3rd wave of coffee
I bought roaster machine it's old one and manual
I will attach some pics for my roaster

Please help me to find good and acceptable espresso blend and I need to know what level of roast I need to reach
Thank you so much

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another_jim
Team HB

#2: Post by another_jim » Sep 18, 2018, 11:26 am

Abdullah reached out to me in a PM; and I suggested he try posting his questions here.

The traditional Italian espresso is a blend that usually has 40% to 60% dry or honey processed Brazilian coffees roasted medium in a long roast to maximize the sweet caramel flavors. There will be about 30% darker roasted Indonesian or Indian coffees for smokey and chocolate flavors. In addition, there may be some Central American or African coffees for acidity. Finally there usually is 10% to 20% Robusta (up to 50% in inexpensive blends), which adds body and a nutty flavor if done right.

There are a huge number of Italian espresso roasters with a lot of variety in their roasts, so this recipe is just a rough outline, not a description of anyone's actual blend. More to the point is the taste that is desired by Italian roasters, which is a mild "comfort food" flavor with lots of body and crema, and no sharp edges.

However, this advice needs to be adapted to the business environment in Saudi Arabia, about which I know so little that I don't even know what questions to ask. I hope other members can be more helpful.
Jim Schulman

Enjazlines

#3: Post by Enjazlines » Sep 18, 2018, 12:51 pm

Thank you so much

Enjazlines

#4: Post by Enjazlines » Sep 18, 2018, 1:11 pm

By the way I have no knowledge why I choose this bean I just find it in my shop :lol:

Ziv Sade

#5: Post by Ziv Sade » Nov 04, 2018, 12:56 am

another_jim wrote:Abdullah reached out to me in a PM; and I suggested he try posting his questions here.

The traditional Italian espresso is a blend that usually has 40% to 60% dry or honey processed Brazilian coffees roasted medium in a long roast to maximize the sweet caramel flavors. There will be about 30% darker roasted Indonesian or Indian coffees for smokey and chocolate flavors. In addition, there may be some Central American or African coffees for acidity. Finally there usually is 10% to 20% Robusta (up to 50% in inexpensive blends), which adds body and a nutty flavor if done right.

There are a huge number of Italian espresso roasters with a lot of variety in their roasts, so this recipe is just a rough outline, not a description of anyone's actual blend. More to the point is the taste that is desired by Italian roasters, which is a mild "comfort food" flavor with lots of body and crema, and no sharp edges.

However, this advice needs to be adapted to the business environment in Saudi Arabia, about which I know so little that I don't even know what questions to ask. I hope other members can be more helpful.
So Jim -

According to your description a tipical Italian roast will use different roast batches to acheive different roast level and only then they will blend the roasted beans - right?

I thought most of the Italian espresso blends are pre-blend

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another_jim
Team HB

#6: Post by another_jim » Nov 04, 2018, 1:21 am

Enjoy this page from Sandalj, a major Italian coffee importer. The bottom of the page has sixteen green coffee preblends running from 100% Arabica to 100% Robusta. (wish they would sell it in 5 pound bags)

So when I say "typical Italian espresso," I'm taking about coffees like one gets from he major roasters supplying the bulk of the bars. Most fo these have beans at different roast levels, indicating post blending. Post blending at any proportion is easy for large roasters. We home roasters or small shop roasters mostly have to use simple proportions. Robsutas are the exception, since they last about six months, and if anything, get better. I roasst a bag and spice up my morning cappa, for the extra kick and improvement in the latte art.
Jim Schulman

Ziv Sade

#7: Post by Ziv Sade » Nov 05, 2018, 4:18 pm

Thanks Jim.

So you really keep your roasted robusta for few months?
When you say you add them to your capuchino - do you mean for each cup in single dosing or to the rest of your arabica blend?

Also, do you have recommendation for beans that will provide me really low acidity and bitter choclate notes?

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another_jim
Team HB

#8: Post by another_jim » Nov 05, 2018, 5:41 pm

I single dose, and blend shots as if they were cocktails. Robusta keeps almost indefinitely in a simple valve bag.

I'd go with a blend of Brazil DP or pulp natural roasted medium, and PNG roasted to the second crack. Robusta optional. By varying the roast depth and length of the Brazil, you get the acidity you want. Once you're done roasting, you can control acidity it by altering the blend proportions to taste, as well as the usual Mano tricks.
Jim Schulman

Ziv Sade

#9: Post by Ziv Sade » Nov 05, 2018, 11:50 pm

Thanks once again Jim.

The bitter choclate notes comes from the PNG?

Also - which value bags do you use if you open them every day and close them once again?

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another_jim
Team HB

#10: Post by another_jim » Nov 06, 2018, 12:09 am

The interplay of the Brazil and the PNG should do it. Chocolate is fairly hit or miss, but this is a fairly reliable combo.

I use bulk valve bags from Amazon. They reseal well enough that I can reuse them for several roasts.
Jim Schulman