Any tips to extract the sweetness of the coffee?

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
ymg

#1: Post by ymg »

Hi

Any tips to extract the sweetness of the coffee?
my settings:
bk-600 roasting machine (BC-2)
dumaper:5.5
air flow:25
drum:70
change:185
close gas for 1:30
then go to 1.4 KPA
and down the gas alittle bit every time....

i dont like sourness, and bitter, just want to extract as match as sweetness as i could, i know it's difficult but will be happy to hear any advice...


thanks!

User avatar
another_jim
Team HB

#2: Post by another_jim »

What's the color of your drum? That's completely critical too. :wink: Seriously, all these intermediate process variables are meaningless, both to us or to the coffee. You have to manage the bean temperature, the environmental temperature, and the timing, and that's all.

The sweetest roasts are light, with very little caramelization, since sugars are sweeter than caramels. They are also longer than usual, with some of the acidity and all the grassiness roasted off. Drop your environmental temperatures early, almost stall the roast during the first crack, and hold it there for about 3 minutes before finishing. The coffee you get won't win you any prizes, since the flavors will be subdued; but it will be very sweet, and rather nice for espresso.
Jim Schulman

N3Roaster

#3: Post by N3Roaster »

Another nice approach to sweetness involves manipulating the time spent while the coffee is yellow. I find 100 seconds after the color change from green to yellow and before the color change from yellow to brown is a good starting point, but with some coffees you can transform the character of the sweetness by stretching that out further. A while back I was working on different roasting plans for a versatile coffee from Sulawesi and got a fantastic honey sweetness and aromatics by spending 138 seconds in yellow and then slowly but steadily increasing the rate of change through to a point just a tiny bit past the start of 2nd crack.

Image
★ Helpful

false1001

#4: Post by false1001 »

Agreed with Neal, to really maximize sweetness you want to spend as much time as possible in the Maillard phase. As a general rule of thumb I usually go with a heavy drop in RoR as I hit yellowing and then an almost constant RoR to around 15-20 deg before 1C, where I make adjustments as needed.

For naturals where I try and maximize sweetness I try and go for something like 43:43:14 for my percentages spent in each phase of the roast, and I try to bias my errors towards spending too much time in Maillard as opposed to not enough. Again, all a rule of thumb.

ymg

#5: Post by ymg »

Thank you all.

i having trouble to follow up alittle bit becuase i quite a beginner to real drump roasting.
i understand i need to turn the gas down in yellowing stage. but i tought that i ROR alway must deaccelerate, my graph looks more like that :

Image

can you share your profiles so i will have better understanding on how my roast should go?

thanks alot...

The French Dude

#6: Post by The French Dude »

The constant declining ROR is a roasting style promoted by Rao and some others.
You have different way to roast and different way to drive your roast.
It took me 2 years to discover that fact.

:roll:

ymg

#7: Post by ymg »

Can you share how u roast?
can anyone submit detailed profile as methodology?

so far i went in scott rao way but not sure it's the optimal method to get sweetness

will appreciate help on that ....

thx

User avatar
tgappmayer
Supporter

#8: Post by tgappmayer »

The French Dude wrote:The constant declining ROR is a roasting style promoted by Rao and some others.
You have different way to roast and different way to drive your roast.
It took me 2 years to discover that fact.

:roll:
I'd also love to see a profile which is dramatically different than the constant-decline RoR. This is how I learned, and it's served me well - if I were to answer the question "how to get a sweet coffee", i'd say - stretch 1cs, keep temps low, stretched early stages of the roast. I'd love to see non-Rao approaches to this question though.

User avatar
CarefreeBuzzBuzz
Supporter

#9: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

I would start by trying Neal's advice in Post 3. He has done more testing than anyone else. Try to hit the 100 seconds.
CarefreeBuzzBuzz
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ymg

#10: Post by ymg »

N3Roaster wrote:Another nice approach to sweetness involves manipulating the time spent while the coffee is yellow. I find 100 seconds after the color change from green to yellow and before the color change from yellow to brown is a good starting point, but with some coffees you can transform the character of the sweetness by stretching that out further. A while back I was working on different roasting plans for a versatile coffee from Sulawesi and got a fantastic honey sweetness and aromatics by spending 138 seconds in yellow and then slowly but steadily increasing the rate of change through to a point just a tiny bit past the start of 2nd crack.

image
Neal, can you post your gas settings in order to achieve this kind of ROR ?

thanks