Weber EG-1 Version 3 - Page 3

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
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EvanOz85

#21: Post by EvanOz85 »

heytchap wrote:Cast v2 are dead easy. Sucks that you're having a bad experience.
Never said I was having a bad experience. Weird.

The CV2 are not dead easy for espresso compared to my MAX, MC5, or the 64mm HU. I find the puck integrity to really break down quickly compared to those, and even when I get it right I don't find the taste to be up to par with them. Just not worth messing around with them much when all my other stuff is so much better. My experience echoes most of the experiences of the people in the cast version thread, especially when it comes to the fact that they aren't great for light roast espresso. These burrs are designed for brew, and that's where they really shine. I find the filter coffee from them to almost always come out better from them than the SLM's.

buckersss
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#22: Post by buckersss »

EvanOz85 wrote:Yeah, which is why I'm puzzled that Turin came out with a DF83 rather than a DF80. The larger diameter of 83mm offers an increase in speed, but not really much more edge to edge cutting space than 64mm.
Is it bc of burr price? 83mm italmills are 40 euro. Is there a cheap 80mm out there? I don't know of any.

80mm looks like a great burr size, but all grinders that use it are pricey. A DF80 would have been a welcome addition to the market.

erik82

#23: Post by erik82 »

RTOBarista wrote:This grinder is getting old and the burr size is 83 mm while new grinders are offer 98.
That's just completely wrong. What you're shouting here is that a race car is always better then a offroad vehicle. I'd like to see a race car do a offroad track and even finish.

For me 80mm is the best burr size and gives the most balanced out performance across a large range of roasts and espresso/filter. I see the 98mm grinders more as a one-trick pony and would always prefer 80mm over 98mm. Bigger just isn't always better.

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EvanOz85

#24: Post by EvanOz85 replying to erik82 »

80mm burrs are wonderful, and I would be happy with one as my sole grinder. However I think claiming that 98mm grinders are a one-trick-pony is incorrect. It really depends on the burrs. For example, the SLM Shuriken burrs have been really revolutionary for me. I find they perform well across the board with ratios and roast levels for espresso, as well as being capable of outstanding filter coffee.

Extreme clarity 98mm's like SSP's HU and Brewing burrs may be more of a "one-trick-pony" (albeit a good one), but there are definitely more multipurpose options in this size than there once were.

imp96

#25: Post by imp96 »

Do you have any experience comparing 80mm Ultra burrs to some of the 98mm burrs? I am curious how they compare. I am very satisfied with them for filter brews but interested in how the 98s are.

RTOBarista
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#26: Post by RTOBarista »

Thanks, I just order the Option 0 P64 with SSP HU burrs

Tennantscoffee

#27: Post by Tennantscoffee »

The grinder will stall at low RPM even when grinding medium-light roast for pourover, if the beans fall in very quickly and evenly. I suspected that this is probably due to PID mechanism used maintain the RPM, and the sudden increase in the resistance stalls the motor.
I find this to be both infuriating and hilarious. I own a Key and have the exact same problem.

So let us simplify this....

We have a company that produces a 2k grinder and a 3k+ grinder and they both have issues....wait for it....wait for it....

...grinding coffee. Someone please explain to me why this company gets a pass on this.

I own a Baratza Virt that I use at work...take a wild guess on if that has ever stalled grinding coffee. Come on...we all know the answer.

baristainzmking
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#28: Post by baristainzmking »

Tennantscoffee wrote:I find this to be both infuriating and hilarious. I own a Key and have the exact same problem.

So let us simplify this....

We have a company that produces a 2k grinder and a 3k+ grinder and they both have issues....wait for it....wait for it....

...grinding coffee. Someone please explain to me why this company gets a pass on this.
I don't have a logical explanation for this. It seems to be the case for both Weber Workshop and Kafatek...
Julia

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Chert

#29: Post by Chert »

If a rock or metal washer falls in the baratza vario, it chips the ceramic burr (or perhaps mars the steels I don't know I only had that happen with the ceramic install) and the rubber pulley burns up, No severe damage. But no quick fix if you haven't the parts lying around.

I realize that I assume EG-1 is direct drive, I am not sure if I ever knew, but would a stronger motor perhaps damage the burrset worse if one had that accident occur? Maybe having to feed extra hard roasts in slowly isn't so bad.

I'm glad single dosing makes it even less likely than in the Vario hopper use, too.
LMWDP #198

chipman

#30: Post by chipman »

I have a EG1V1 and a key. Neither of them have ever stalled. Grinding at an ultra slow speed is of no value and in my opinion offers no advantage or any quality in the grind. Sometimes, I think many of these reported issues with equipment (not just Weber) are in fact operator error, and not equipment. Most of us (myself included) will never admit we could be the one at fault.