Turin SD40 (conical burr version of DF64) - any impressions?

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
cactus_farmer

#1: Post by cactus_farmer »

The makers of the DF64 have come out with a 40mm conical burr low retention single-dosing grinder.

Not many impressions of it out yet, here's a video it features in with a brief comparison to the DF64;
Has anyone tried it yet?

Best case scenario is that it turns out to be a Niche Zero equivalent for one-third to half the price...

bas

#2: Post by bas »

Best case scenario is that it turns out to be a Niche Zero equivalent for one-third to half the price...
I consider this as wishful thinking :wink:

Much smaller burrs size. More a modern Nemox Lux, Ascaso i-mini or Bezzera BB005 etc.

nameisjoey

#3: Post by nameisjoey »

It's a shame they didn't really go after the niche and use some Italmil 68mm conicals, like the Pharos uses. Great burrset!

staymesso

#4: Post by staymesso »

My bet is cost. It seems more like a competitor for the Sette than the Niche. Maybe they will target the Niche more directly in the fiture

Pressino

#5: Post by Pressino »

Although the 40mm burr set doesn't impress me, this grinder seems to be extremely attractive in terms of the cost. I watched the video posted above and it actually took less time to grind than the D64 and was a lot quieter.

My electric powered grinders are all flat burr and my conicals are hand-cranked. There ARE in-the-cup differences of coffee taste between the two grinder types. I would probably use the conicals more if they were not more laborious to use than the in the flats.

If I had an SD40 I'm sure I would be using it than my manual grinders. I've considered the Niche Zero, but am not inclined to invest $600+ just to try it out. The SD40 is priced low enough that I would consider it.

cactus_farmer (original poster)

#6: Post by cactus_farmer (original poster) »

staymesso wrote:My bet is cost. It seems more like a competitor for the Sette than the Niche. Maybe they will target the Niche more directly in the fiture
I've seen multiple reports that the SD40 can go coarse enough for pour-over though, which is something the Sette couldn't...

cactus_farmer (original poster)

#7: Post by cactus_farmer (original poster) »

Pressino wrote:My electric powered grinders are all flat burr and my conicals are hand-cranked. There ARE in-the-cup differences of coffee taste between the two grinder types. I would probably use the conicals more if they were not more laborious to use than the in the flats.
What flat burr grinders are you using and with what burr sets?

I always wondered is there only a discernable taste difference between flats and burrs if you're comparing the most top-of-the-line ultra unimodal solid diamond SSP burrs to the dirtiest most fine-producing conicals - or is there still a difference just comparing an average flat to an average conical?

Jonk

#8: Post by Jonk »

There's pretty much always a discernable difference between two different burrs, also when comparing "average" or cheap flat/flat, flat/conical, conical/conical.

It's not unheard of that people claim differences between two new sets from the same manufacturer (that are supposed to be near identical, but in reality tolerances and QC will always add variation).

Sometimes it's smaller than what I've been able to taste, but I might still have been able to measure a noticeable difference in EY between say a broken in set and a slightly worn.

The short answer is that at least in my experience, the difference between traditional espresso burrs, flat/conical, is a lot smaller than people would have you believe. I think it's usually a lot more interesting to compare set A with set B than conical vs. flat.

CoffeeSeeker

#9: Post by CoffeeSeeker »

I actually really enjoy my SD40. I'm using it as a dedicated decaf espresso grinder at my small shop. For the 5-10 shots a week it's responsible for, it's done great. Before that, I used it for different brew methods and various roasts. It seemed to handle everything fine.

It's stepped, so be aware of that. There are also more indicators on the collar than there are steps, which is annoying. The steps seem to be fairly small and I haven't had any issues dialing in with any bean. Still, it would be nice if every indicator line corresponded with a physical step or notch.

The adjustments are repeatable though, so moving from one bean to another when I've been playing around has been painless.

It's slower and quieter than a Sette, but then most grinders are.

It has a small footprint.

I'm not at all unhappy with my purchase, but my expectations were pretty measured.

cactus_farmer (original poster)

#10: Post by cactus_farmer (original poster) »

CoffeeSeeker wrote:It's slower and quieter than a Sette, but then most grinders are.

It has a small footprint.

I'm not at all unhappy with my purchase, but my expectations were pretty measured.
Is the cup profile similar to the Sette? Or is it higher in clarity and thinner in body?

If the SD40 is basically a 'Sette that can do pour-over', I'd be very interested...