Turin DF64V Grinder - Page 16

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
boren
Posts: 1085
Joined: 14 years ago

#151: Post by boren »

So do you guys do this when you're adjusting a manual grinder from pourover to espresso? What do you use as a third hand?

LObin
Posts: 1770
Joined: 7 years ago

#152: Post by LObin »

TobiasFunke wrote:Hi there. I'm very tempted towards getting this grinder, however I keep reading in reddit issues with stalling at low (less than 1000) rpm. Apparently newer units have this new board. Is this still the case? Any other issues? My purpose would be pour over with ssp mp
110v units still suffer from stalling at low RPM (600-700) with dense, light roasted coffees, mostly for espresso.
I have mine set on 1000 rpm and haven't had the slightest hiccup.

For pour over with SSP MP, you shouldn't have any issues, even at 600.

Stalling is not an issue with 220v DF64V's.
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DaveC
Posts: 1714
Joined: 17 years ago

#153: Post by DaveC »

LObin wrote: Stalling is not an issue with 220v DF64V's.
This may not actually be the case...I have heard comment that the 220V can still stall (safety cutout, whatever). I'm not 100% sure, but I'm not 100% sure they don't either.

The phenomenon seems common with the variable speed brushless motors when speeds are at the lower end and it happens in quite a few different grinders....the answer being just run it faster. One of my little rants which I posted about some time ago in another thread is that grinders should be restricted to a speed range when they shouldn't stall...or at least the influencers/manufacturers should inform people that a lot of them will stall when run too slow. The incorrect expectation in the community generally is to take the range of speeds as more than just a speed capability...but a grinding speed capability as well.

The DF64V is a nice little grinder, I have one, but I am realistic about the speed limitations in certain situations. In fact I don't find the variable speed hugely useful and leave mine set on around 1100 I think.

LObin
Posts: 1770
Joined: 7 years ago

#154: Post by LObin replying to DaveC »

Since the updated board, the reports from European and Australian reviewers and users (YouTube and FB group) suggest that stalling is not an issue anymore with the 220v units. It can still happen on rare occasions or if someone is trying hard to provoke this, but it's certainly not prone to stalling like the 120v 64Vs are, even with the latest board update. That was my point.

But yeah, it's a neat little grinder, even with the 120v motor. They could have limited the RPM range to 900-1400 or even have it fixed imo. There are other designs on the 64V that have a positive impact on workflow and usability, making it more attractive than its variable RPM feature, imo.

Funny enough though, earlier today I switched the RPM to 1800 (normally stick to 1000 and forget about it) only because I offered to pull espresso drinks at my kids school bake sale for a fundraiser. The faster grinding speed didn't turn it into a commercial mazzer but it was somewhat helpful.
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tompoland
Posts: 268
Joined: 3 years ago

#155: Post by tompoland »

That's certainly case with the V.

Resistance is stiffer at the finer end of the grind range than it is at the coarser end. I tested this specifically for a review I recently posted on YT *.


DF64 Coffee responded saying that the manufacturer deliberately made the collar stiffer so that it mitigates the likelihood of shifting during grinding. But to me, that's a design deficiency. The Duo or Zero for example have a much smoother dial adjustment all the way around the range with few reports of drifting. Sure, I'd prefer to have a stiffer collar and no drift, but even better is to have smooth collar adjustment with no drift.

I like my Vs very much. But this is one of several examples where the Duo's superior design and specs trumps the V. The others include the stalling issue on the V and retention being higher on the V. All of these issues can be mitigated and managed but a better design, such as can be found in the Duo, eliminates the need for any mitigation or management.

(* Mods please note: the last time I posted about a grinder on HB some smarty pants googled me and discovered that, horror or horrors, I was a marketer. A bunch of members took the position of 'guilty until proven innocent', grabbed their pitchforks and the thread was shut down. I am a marketer, but only of advisory services, not physical products and I have no commercial interest in any grinder. As was the case in that thread, I bought the V with my hard earned and I received no discount and made no promises of a review.)
A little obsessed.

xiotaki
Posts: 22
Joined: 5 months ago

#156: Post by xiotaki »

hey all I've been having an issue with lower burr wobble. you can see my detailed post here:
Is this burr housing wobble normal on my DF64V?

as per my last post on there, can any of you who already own a DF64V take a similar video so I can see how you lower burr is spinning?
I' starting to think that we are all either using a terrible grinder or I'm just looking way too much into this? Have any of you ever looked this close at your grinder?

tompoland
Posts: 268
Joined: 3 years ago

#157: Post by tompoland »

LObin wrote:Since the updated board, the reports from European and Australian reviewers and users (YouTube and FB group) suggest that stalling is not an issue anymore with the 220v units. It can still happen on rare occasions or if someone is trying hard to provoke this,
I wish that were true. U have 2x DF64Vs. I've tested them, not with a view to trying to make it stall although I don't see anything wrong with doing that. It's a grinder that is made in such a way that it will stall and there is a cut out switch to prevent damage when it stalls. Unlike the Duo, of which I also have two units.

Unfortunately, I can assure you that they will stall consistently with true light roasts at 600rpm, be that at the espresso range or filter. Feeding the beans in slowly mitigates the likelihood but the V aint no Duo, that's for sure. And my true light roasts, I'm referring to what a specialty roaster such as Prodigal would call light. In the old days we'd have called them Cinammon.
A little obsessed.

tompoland
Posts: 268
Joined: 3 years ago

#158: Post by tompoland »

I popped the top off one of my Vs and took a video. This grinder is performing flawlessly but you get to decide if it's similar to yours or if yours is worse.

Do you have any issues with grind consistency?

BTW the Duo does the same thing.
A little obsessed.

LObin
Posts: 1770
Joined: 7 years ago

#159: Post by LObin »

tompoland wrote:I wish that were true. U have 2x DF64Vs. I've tested them, not with a view to trying to make it stall although I don't see anything wrong with doing that. It's a grinder that is made in such a way that it will stall and there is a cut out switch to prevent damage when it stalls. Unlike the Duo, of which I also have two units.

Unfortunately, I can assure you that they will stall consistently with true light roasts at 600rpm, be that at the espresso range or filter. Feeding the beans in slowly mitigates the likelihood but the V aint no Duo, that's for sure. And my true light roasts, I'm referring to what a specialty roaster such as Prodigal would call light. In the old days we'd have called them Cinammon.
I guess that's why I wrote "like it can still happen on rare occasions".
On the other hand, there are reviewers that have had difficulty making their 220v units stall even at cold starts with light roasts. It seems that anything below a medium roast at 600rpm will stall on 120v units. Fine and even sometimes med-fine grinds like Aeropress.

Ourcoffeeshelter did mention having a 3rd board iteration with an anti-stall feature that momentary turns the motor off and back on. Not much info on it though.
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xiotaki
Posts: 22
Joined: 5 months ago

#160: Post by xiotaki »

tompoland wrote:video

Do you have any issues with grind consistency?

BTW the Duo does the same thing.
Thx for this! I'll have to try and give this a closer look, but as for grind consistency I don't think I know enough to judge that.

I've tried more pourover with it so I've only pulled about a dozen shots with it and about 1/3 of my esspressos seem to have channeling with this grinder . And it feels more so than my build in barista express conical grinder!