Turin DF54 - Cleaning and Reinstalling Upper Burr

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Jebez
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#1: Post by Jebez »

Greetings friends.
I have a question regarding the DF54, that I think is applicable to other similar grinder designs.
The instruction pamphlet states that when reinstalling the upper burr after cleaning, that it should be turned clockwise to the point where it can't be turned any more, then to turn it clockwise to an appropriate espresso setting (10 for example). I assume that the motor is off when reinstalling the upper burr.
That approach makes sense, however, I've often read that when reinstalling an upper burr, that the motor is to be turned on and that the upper burr is tightened until there is a chirping sound (burrs beginning to touch) - at which point the upper burr is turned counterclockwise. Is there a preferred method, or does it not matter?
I also wanted to know best practice for cleaning frequency if the grinder is used for only one shot a day.
Thank you in advance for your suggestions and advice.

Jebez (original poster)
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Posts: 189
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#2: Post by Jebez (original poster) »

Greetings friends.
I just purchased a new grinder (DF54 flat burr) and I think a small, but powerful, hand-held vacuum cleaner would be a good idea for a thorough cleaning.
Any recommendations or suggestions are greatly appreciated.
Thank you in advance.

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Jeff
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#3: Post by Jeff »

The question of "how often" is perhaps the more interesting one. I think a lot will depend on the roast level of your beans. Darker roasts can be oily and oily grinds can have a greater tendency to stick to the burrs and other parts of the grinder. At least, in my opinion, grinds that end up packed underneath things aren't going to significantly impact the flavor of your coffee. If you have stale grinds on the burrs or other parts of the grinder that can mix with new grinds, that can impact the taste of your coffee.

If you're using a puffer and your beans aren't oily, you probably aren't getting a lot of retention that exchanges. If that's the case, I'd disassemble the grinder, uh, when you're bored? Maybe every six months or a year? Occasionally vacuuming it from the top and bottom is probably a good idea. Maybe when you vacuum the rest of your area?

If you're using beans that are oily, I'd probably open it up and brush it clean much more frequently. I use a stiff brush to clean burrs when I do open one up. It is about 1/2" wide and 1/2" long and originally intended for cleaning PCBs in electronic shops. Stiff is the important part.

For a vacuum, I happen to use a small ShopVac. One of the better rechargeable hand-held vacs would probably work well. I use a crevice tool which gets in bigger small places and I can use my hand to roughly seal it against the opening to suck through the grinder.

On reassembling, make sure all parts go back in the same orientation. Mark the top of things that can go in upside or downside. Mark one of the three wings of the upper carrier if it uses that style. If things go back as they came apart, your "zero" or "chirp point" should not change more that a mark or two.

If you want, you can check you chirp point by unplugging the grinder and turning the burrs by hand (assuming it is built like the DF64). The burrs need to be totally clean to be consistent in this test. Once you know the sound of burrs touching, you can do the same with the motor. I don't recommend that until you know what you're listening for and about where to expect it.

Jebez (original poster)
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Posts: 189
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#4: Post by Jebez (original poster) »

Thank you @Jeff for taking the time to share your knowledge and all of that useful information, especially with regard to checking the 'chirp point'. I sincerely appreciate it.
I'm now all set to exercise good practice with my new grinder! :D