So what's the current 'no-holds-barred' espresso grinder? - Page 3

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
indraunt

#21: Post by indraunt » Dec 14, 2013, 3:17 pm

We're using the EK exclusively in my new cafe. Frankly, it produces fantastic espresso with a consistency that puts anything else I've used to shame.

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Spitz.me

#22: Post by Spitz.me » Dec 14, 2013, 4:05 pm

The user experiences, feedback and quickly increasing adoption rate of the use of the EK43 is something that cannot be ignored. Marshall joked about it just being a matter of time before it becomes the 'it' grinder on H-B. I agree that it seems as though this will become one of the 3 top options when seriously considering an espresso grinder. Therefore, if I was looking for a new top espresso grinder, I'd seriously consider the EK43. Why not?
I know I've pulled a great shot when the flavour is 'like a beany taste that tastes like a bean'.

happycat

#23: Post by happycat » Dec 14, 2013, 5:07 pm

I would love to hear more from EK-43 users about their experiences.

1. How do they fit the EK-43 into their existing setup?
2. What good / challenging experiences did they have?
3. How did they adapt their workflow and coffee usage to the EK-43?
4. What are the effects of the EK-43 on the business and customer sat?

I've read as much as I can find about it. I think Colin Harmon had the most intriguing info.

My interest is purely academic (I don't run a coffee business) as I am curious about the EK-43 representing a different paradigm in coffee production due to its size, cost, monomodal grinding, and changes in flavour profiles.

I think this is important to investigate. Who knows... maybe this is part of the Fourth Wave? What coffees and roasts, drinks, etc. work best? What is the effect on service time? Consistency and simplicity in drink production?

Sorry... I'm in the midst of planning a major multi-case research effort so I'm in full academic mode.
LMWDP #603

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arcus

#24: Post by arcus » Dec 14, 2013, 7:39 pm

The EK43 is certainly interesting but I wouldn't consider it just because I think it's ugly looking.

SJM

#25: Post by SJM » Dec 14, 2013, 7:45 pm

I certainly hope it's the Compak K-10 I just won on eBay !!!!

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uscfroadie

#26: Post by uscfroadie » replying to SJM » Dec 14, 2013, 7:53 pm

Saw it and was hoping it would go to a HB'er. $960 is a good price. Congrats!
Merle

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FotonDrv

#27: Post by FotonDrv » Dec 14, 2013, 10:28 pm

I also notice that there has been no mention of a Versalab modded by Terranova!?
That Light at the End of the Tunnel is actually a train

kwantfm

#28: Post by kwantfm » replying to FotonDrv » Dec 15, 2013, 5:56 am

How could we all have missed out on that one???
LMWDP #602

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TomC
Team HB

#29: Post by TomC » replying to kwantfm » Dec 15, 2013, 10:51 am


The OP said commercial environment. Frank's highly modded VL's are working pieces of mechanical art, not unlike a $40,000 Swiss timepiece. But even Frank is not very keen on the general VL design. I wouldn't put something like his version or the stock version in a busy commercial environment and expect success in the long run. Commercial grinders are built for longevity. The VL, not quite. His modded VL or the other amazing things he has brewing would likely be the end-all highest quality grinder you could have in a home bar though.

indraunt

#30: Post by indraunt » Dec 16, 2013, 9:41 am

happycat wrote:I would love to hear more from EK-43 users about their experiences.

1. How do they fit the EK-43 into their existing setup?
The process of making espresso using an EK is different to that of a normal espresso grinder. My space was partly designed around using the EK as my only grinder, so in my case it was more about fitting the setup around the EK.
2. What good / challenging experiences did they have?
It's consistent like nothing else. Dialling in can be done in one or two shots, and the number of grind adjustments you'll do in a given day is minimal. The challenge is more about having to portion out all your shots in advance. The advantage of this is because each dose is weighed out you can take away any uncertainty that you might have with other grinders as to the dose consistency. Your shots are more controllable because you've taken away a variable. Occasionally someone will forget to set the dial back to position after doing a filter or guest espresso, but being able to use the one grinder for everything is pretty fantastic.
3. How did they adapt their workflow and coffee usage to the EK-43?
Multiple portafilters, a portafilter holder, dosing funnel, and dosing brush. If we are particularly busy one person will do nothing but grind, dose, tamp, and hand portafilters to the other baristas.
4. What are the effects of the EK-43 on the business and customer sat?
The EK allows us to do volumes and speed with a consistency that is pretty special. You wouldn't think it'd be suitable to high-volume or speed, but you do have to almost design your space around using it to be able to use it to its fullest. Customer satisfaction is high, the workflow and process of using it gives our espresso preparation a weird ritualistic/scientific appearance that people tend to find quite curious.

My interest is purely academic (I don't run a coffee business) as I am curious about the EK-43 representing a different paradigm in coffee production due to its size, cost, monomodal grinding, and changes in flavour profiles.
When you realise that it is possible to do the work of any number of other grinders with a single beast, then the cost is tiny in comparison to other options.
The coffee it produces can be delicious, but it can highlight ashiness in badly roasted coffee. Because of its stability you wind up playing more with variables elsewhere such as the temperature and the pressure of the machine instead of grind and dose to get the coffee tasting great, its consistency and stability lends a clarity to the coffee that allows you to better identify what other variables need to change beyond the standard grind/dose. However, it often doesn't pour nicely(which I'm putting down to its monomodal grinding). If you come from a background of visually assessing shots to determine quality you may be in for a bit of re-training, otherwise you'll be chasing a unicorn while perfectly good shots are going to waste.
I think this is important to investigate. Who knows... maybe this is part of the Fourth Wave? What coffees and roasts, drinks, etc. work best? What is the effect on service time? Consistency and simplicity in drink production?
Haven't had the best experience with anything darkly roasted. It tends to amplify flaws in roast, so dark roasts tend to come out quite ashy and charcoaly. Effect on service time is minimal to none, but we've designed the bar around using it. Consistency and simplicity is exceptional.