Repository of electrical measurements from grinders

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
buckersss

#1: Post by buckersss »

Curious if people who have a home multi-meter are willing to post the power draw and or current draw of their grinders. ideally looking for north american 60Hz 110-120v measurements.

i find real life performance can deviate from manufacturers specs and reseller specs. i understand too that certification isnt always reflective of actual performance.

ideally im curious about power/current draw after full spin up - no beans in the chamber. always open to more information if you want to post under load/while grinding too. expect that it would be valuable to post how roasted your beans are if you want to contribute measurements under load.

i thought this may be valuable for many people, so ill say measurements from any and all grinders are welcome.

i appreciate that comparing grinders with ac motors and dc motors is apples and orange. Also appreciate that efficiency can drastically effect what gets absorbed by the motor. all else being equal, im looking to validate that which has been advertised by the manufacturer.

to kick it off id forever be appreciative of anyone willing to take and post measurements for the atom 75 and mahlkonig k30. Ty

Baratza: skilled in the art of grinding
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AssafL
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#2: Post by AssafL »

Whoa...

Measuring current on a mains connected equipment, sometimes with a chopper and/or switched mode power supply, is not a "home" multimeter thing.

You need an RMS meter, that has an Amp range that will not fry the fuse (startup current may be large). Or better a clamp and an exposed wire section (or loops). You need to multiply voltage by current.

And to measure current you have to connect it inline (so buy a extender, open the wire, solder....).

I have some DC measurements for a Versalab at Versalab M3 vs. Others.
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

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cafeIKE
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#3: Post by cafeIKE »

I have 4 grinders, the tools and the knowledge how to do it

I've measured just about every other espresso related parameter, but for the life of me can't think why I would care.

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BaristaBoy E61

#4: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

AssafL wrote:You need an RMS meter, that has an Amp range that will not fry the fuse (startup current may be large). Or better a clamp and an exposed wire section (or loops). You need to multiply voltage by current.
Here are my 'measurements' of a Mahlkonig K30 Vario grinder with a Fluke 'True RMS' multimeter done as Assaf has mentioned above with an inductive coupler on 1-side of the AC line measuring millivolts AC multiplied AC line voltage.

Meter set to capture 100ms peak, min. & max.

Peak measured 1,048.32 watts
Avg. measured 851.76 watts

For what it's worth...
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

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AssafL
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#5: Post by AssafL »

BaristaBoy E61 wrote:Here are my 'measurements' with a Fluke 'True RMS' multimeter done as Assaf has mentioned above with an inductive coupler on 1-side of the AC line measuring millivolts AC multiplied AC line voltage.

Meter set to capture 100ms peak, min. & max.

Peak measured 1,048.32 watts
Avg. measured 851.76 watts

For what it's worth...
I think he wanted no beans (sort of iron losses in the core).

1048W would hopefully be with beans....
Scraping away (slowly) at the tyranny of biases and dogma.

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BaristaBoy E61

#6: Post by BaristaBoy E61 » replying to AssafL »

No beans 100ms peak. Seems rather high I thought... But it is in-rush.
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

buckersss (original poster)

#7: Post by buckersss (original poster) »

AssafL wrote:Whoa...

Measuring current on a mains connected equipment, sometimes with a chopper and/or switched mode power supply, is not a "home" multimeter thing.

You need an RMS meter, that has an Amp range that will not fry the fuse (startup current may be large). Or better a clamp and an exposed wire section (or loops). You need to multiply voltage by current.

And to measure current you have to connect it inline (so buy a extender, open the wire, solder....).

I have some DC measurements for a Versalab at Versalab M3 vs. Others.
I mean there is more than 1 way to skin a cat. Those are great, but I'm not advocating anybody perform any work they aren't confident in or do anything without taking the right safety precautions. I'd be over the moon with a simple power reading from an inline killawatt meter.
BaristaBoy E61 wrote:Here are my 'measurements' of a Mahlkonig K30 Vario grinder with a Fluke 'True RMS' multimeter done as Assaf has mentioned above with an inductive coupler on 1-side of the AC line measuring millivolts AC multiplied AC line voltage.

Meter set to capture 100ms peak, min. & max.

Peak measured 1,048.32 watts
Avg. measured 851.76 watts

For what it's worth...
Amazing! Thank you. I expected it to be pretty spot on but that's impressive. I expect it'd draw even more when grinding. Much appreciated.

ECM Manufacture: @ecmespresso #weliveespresso
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yakster
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#8: Post by yakster »

A Kill-A-Watt might be an easier way to measure this.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272