Removing Super Jolly lower burr carrier - Page 2

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SJM

#11: Post by SJM »

Paul_Pratt wrote:An easier way is to use long bolts and tighten them in sequence. The bolts push against the main body and force the carrier off. The risk of damage is low because the amount of force required is very small.
Brilliant ! I wish I'd seen this before I took the bottom burr out of my Rancilio MD50 yesterday. I didn't do any damage, but your solution is sooooooo elegant !

Susan

dingrr

#12: Post by dingrr »

Holy @#$%!

I've been searching for a solution to this (mostly on CoffeeGeeks) and was just about to have someone machine a special puller for me and here is this beautiful description on how to get this part off without prying or hammering. Excellent! Now that that lower burr carrier is off, I unscrewed three screws from beneath it and the motor still does not come out the bottom. Arrrgh! I can see two additional screwheads that catch the motor windings but the armature should slide out, no? That should give me access to the last two screws.

Mine is a Mazzer Super Jolly.

Thanks so much!

Dan

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jesawdy

#13: Post by jesawdy »

dingrr wrote:Now that that lower burr carrier is off, I unscrewed three screws from beneath it and the motor still does not come out the bottom. Arrrgh! I can see two additional screwheads that catch the motor windings but the armature should slide out, no? That should give me access to the last two screws.

Mine is a Mazzer Super Jolly.
Dan, you're going to think I am crazy, but I believe you have to place the grinder in an oven to get the motor out... seriously. I haven't done this, and I don't suggest it, but that's what I recall reading.
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HB
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#14: Post by HB »

I remember too... Mazzer super jolly - what are signs of motor/bearings on the way out?
HB wrote:You're probably right about the bearing, that sounds like one of the Tagex grinders that Lino et al bought. He replaced a bearing for a few bucks and was off to the races. But keep in mind that he's Mr. Handy Extraordinaire. From what he said, getting the motor in and out was a pain because it's pressed into the shell.
lino wrote:It is a pain to press the motor in and out. Sean Lennon suggested a much easier method. Heat it up.
Put the grinder in the oven at a lowish temp 250-300, and wait till you hear the clunk...

BUT... You don't need to get the coil out to change the bearing.

You'll still need to pull/press the lower bearing carrier, and possibly the upper bearing - either off the shaft or out of the housing, or both. A nice cheap puller set or two from Harbor Freight, or the like, works well as you can mix match and grind the tool to fit your needs.

The bearing was about $7 from Enco, if I remember right. The original bearings in the SJ were shielded, not sealed. I replaced them with sealed and it's slightly louder (than a working shielded one), and spins down faster. Seals add friction and noise. The SJ design does a reasonable job of protecting the bearing so it doesn't need seals.

ciao

lino
Dan Kehn

lino

#15: Post by lino »

Yeah, what he said...

I've used a puller the couple times I've done it, so I can't speak with experience about the heating method.

The puller is a bit of a pain because there is very little room on the far side to grab anything, all the coils wires are in the way.

I ended up making a puller out of some bar stock and various bits of a few pullers or maybe it was just out of a couple pullers.


Before you take the motor stator (coil) out, you need to get the lower bearing carrier out, I believe jacking bolts can be used (as per Paul's suggestions about the burr carrier), but you have to fight the bearing if it stays stuck on both the shaft and the carrier.

Once that's out, then you can gently tap out the rotor and shaft from above. (tap from top, exit bottom).

Then the upper bearing can be pressed out or the stator pulled out. If you heat it, don't get it too hot, cause you'll have a bunch of wires in there. You certainly don't want to melt any insulation in the core (but they can typically take pretty high temps).


Hope that helps a bit...

ciao

lino

dingrr

#16: Post by dingrr »

OK, I talked to a guy at work and he'll take it to his friends shop to see if they can press it out. I'm busy roofing the house so I have little time for this project right now.

IronBarista

#17: Post by IronBarista »

What size bolts are they? I'm thinking maybe M3 or M4 thread. I would like to get a few short of having to take one out and comparing the size.
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Psyd
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#18: Post by Psyd »

Maybe it's just me, but if this is the method to get the carrier out, anyone have any experience getting it back in? Will it seat just fine by tightening the top bolt, or does it need some other additional persuasion. One of the Majors is wrong (it grinds just fine, thenkeweverramush, but it does it on eight, whereas the 'real' setting should be around two) and I'm suspecting that the coffee tinkerer I bought it from may have disassembled it and reassembled it incorrectly. Tagex may have played a part in its history, but I got it cheap enough that I really don't care too much about much other than it does grind espresso as well as my 'real' Major. Slightly odd noise, and adjustment wheel settings that don't correspond to any other Mazzer I've ever seen are the only real differences between this and any other Major.
Still, if I were comfortable with the thought that I could get both apart and back together without hurting myself or the grinders...
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lilotaku (original poster)

#19: Post by lilotaku (original poster) »

Psyd,

Their is a "key" in which the lower carrier specifically fits into. The shaft has a pin that goes through it perpendicularly and the lower carrier is notched to go over those pins. I did have to carefully align the carrier and did have to take a small rubber mallet and persuade it in. I don't think just tightening the bolt is gonna do the job, it needs a good bit of force to get fully seated. I'm sure you can easily see what i mean when you take the carrier out. real easy to get out and back in.
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Psyd
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#20: Post by Psyd »

lilotaku wrote:I did have to carefully align the carrier and did have to take a small rubber mallet and persuade it in.
Now see, somehow I don't see no Eye-talian fine technicians banging on the mechanical works with a hammer to get 'em apart or together. While that may pose absolutely no threat to something as beefy as my Majors, I'm still cautious...
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