Olympia Moccaclub grinder - Page 2

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
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Knock

#11: Post by Knock »

Hi John,
Beautiful in its way but in need of restoration and with no guarantee of parts - thus it got too expensive for me. You got nice price on yours though! :wink: - all things are traceable!

Better news still: rooting about it seems you may have an Anfim Superbest on your hands - a more powerful motor and a slightly larger hopper, sometimes with the cut-off plate. You shouldn't have too many probems getting parts so it was worth the risk after all.

There is a great deal of confusion about over the various Anfims as they share so many parts and the specs are so apparently close - eg the dosers (with or without the tamper) are the same on the Haus, Best and Superbest; the body of the Haus is only slightly different from that of the Best/Superbest but exactly the same height as the Best. Key differences are motor power and grinder plate size. I think Lance Goffnet has set out a table of the various differences somewhere on CG. The confusion then extends to the main rebranders - Pasquini, ECM etc. Mostly though the ownership experiences are positive - James Hoffman (current WBC champ) has often stated his enjoyment of using his Anfim despite, as he points out, it's lack of microadjustment - and presumably his access to a host of other machines

Let us know which of the anfims it is then.

By the way Ideor - wondering what gives the older grinder away as a Fiorenzato (doser case and handle maybe?). Anyone got a reference?
Peter Kilpatrick

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JB130

#12: Post by JB130 »

Knock wrote:Better news still: rooting about it seems you may have an Anfim Superbest on your hands - a more powerful motor and a slightly larger hopper, sometimes with the cut-off plate. You shouldn't have too many problems getting parts so it was worth the risk after all.

There is a great deal of confusion about over the various Anfims as they share so many parts and the specs are so apparently close - eg the dosers (with or without the tamper) are the same on the Haus, Best and Superbest; the body of the Haus is only slightly different from that of the Best/Superbest but exactly the same height as the Best. Key differences are motor power and grinder plate size. I think Lance Goffnet has set out a table of the various differences somewhere on CG. The confusion then extends to the main rebranders - Pasquini, ECM etc. Mostly though the ownership experiences are positive - James Hoffman (current WBC champ) has often stated his enjoyment of using his Anfim despite, as he points out, it's lack of microadjustment - and presumably his access to a host of other machines
Thanks Sneaky, this is very helpful. The distinction between Best and Superbest is not immediately obvious. Based on the schematics here, it looks to me like the Superbest and Best have a lot in common: namely, the same body, and the same burrs. But I think the motors may be slightly different; Vibiemme is yet another rebrander of these grinders, and their website here shows that the Best motor is 0.3 HP, while the Superbest is 0.35 HP. Both have the same 1200 rpm though. From the same website, a picture of the Best:

Image

(Strangely they show a mirror-image flip for the black one ... I am sure the on/off switch is really on the right!)

And a picture of the Superbest:

Image

Besides the slight HP change I only see 2 obvious differences: The Superbest sits on a pedestal that is missing on the Best, and the Superbest has the pro-style doser that is used on the bigger Anfims. Since mine seems to have a Best-like doser and no pedestal, I'm beginning to think I have an early Best.

I've got some 54-mm Best/Superbest burrs on order, we'll see if they fit!

John

ideor

#13: Post by ideor »

john asked: "does anyone know if the best was being made in 1986?"

do not have a launch date for the model but know it goes back as far as 1976 when pavoni was using it as a companion for the eurobar machine (current approx. 1976-81). the eurobar was offered in orange and in white. pavoni had the grinders finished to match. the last time i visited it there was a photo of one in museum section of the pavoni factory web site. http://www.lapavoni.com/

anfim/anfin: there is currently a vintage commercial grinder-doser on german ebay that is clearly badged as anfin:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... 0172999651

the auction has just concluded but listing is still up as of this writing. perhaps the firm had a reorganisation at some point and the acronym changed.

my experience of the best: purchased one new in 1980 from fama sales co. of new york city. it came finished in a textured tan. i found the grind adjustment awkward to operate as it was necessary to remove the hopper first. the spring for the adjustment pin was very stiff and the button used to depress the pin was too small. the doser was worse. its floor was warped plastic and when the dosing lever was operated there was an unpleasant sensation of drag-slip, drag-slip, drag-slip. only owned it a brief time. in fairness this machine was likely manufactured in the late 1970's and numerous improvements have been made to the model in the interim. have seen the pasquini moka and the anfim haus in person. these units have a much better fit and finish than the example i owned.

the plastic nameplate panel on the back is held in place with a spring wire. if you lift up the bottom edge of the panel with something like the tip of a table knife you will see how to disconnect it, affording a view of the interior.


Knock asked: "wondering what gives the older grinder away as a fiorenzato?" and "got a reference?"

the significators for me were the adjustment collar, the fork and the pattern of the doser (not the doser itself but the pattern). i do not recall seeing this body before. would guess that it must have enjoyed but a brief production life. there is also the possibility that it was proprietary for olympia, unlikely but a possibility. it is an odd combination of new and old with the inox doser. most manufacturers went from chrome plated brass dosers to aluminum and then on to inox, presumably to meet ce requirements. mazzer for example only went to an inox doser in 1996/7. btw the firm elettromec also produced grinders with a similar, although clearly different, body to this olympia under the brand name zambon. they are still in business however their web site shows no grinders. here is an auction listing for one:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... 0156637870


reference: take a look at a fiorenzato model t-80. this was their standard model grinder-doser for many years until it was supplanted by the doge series just recently. there is an excellent collection of images of a t-80 here:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... :IT&ih=011

wbc james hoffman and anfim: Knock mentioned the world champion's enjoyment of anfim grinders. there is a thread that gets into this at the coffeed forum: http://forum.coffeed.com/viewtopic.php?t=1171
keep in mind that the posters are writing about the "big boys" of the anfim range, specifically the lusso and the super caimano. the factory web site showing all the models is located here: http://www.anfim.net/

grinder factories: mazzer and fiorenzato are both located in the town of mestre in the veneto region. macap is close by in martellago. anfim is billetted in milano.

please excuse me for not posting photos directly. am very much a computer tyro. :( perhaps if the linked to photos are found helpful someone can strip them out and add them to the thread.

hope this of some use.

ideor

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JB130

#14: Post by JB130 »

ideor wrote:do not have a launch date for the model but know it goes back as far as 1976 when pavoni was using it as a companion for the eurobar machine (current approx. 1976-81). the eurobar was offered in orange and in white. pavoni had the grinders finished to match. the last time i visited it there was a photo of one in museum section of the pavoni factory web site. http://www.lapavoni.com/
Thank you, Ideor! This is very helpful information. I checked the museum on lapavoni.com (note the corrected URL) and did indeed find the Best:
Image
This is definitely the same grinder as mine. The only apparent difference (besides the La Pavoni label) is the chrome collar on the hopper.

The list of Anfim rebranders is growing longer everyday: Olympia Express, ECM, Pasquini, Vibiemme, Stafco, La Pavoni ... maybe it would be easier to list the companies who have not rebranded an Anfim!
ideor wrote:my experience of the best: purchased one new in 1980 from fama sales co. of new york city. it came finished in a textured tan. i found the grind adjustment awkward to operate as it was necessary to remove the hopper first. the spring for the adjustment pin was very stiff and the button used to depress the pin was too small. the doser was worse. its floor was warped plastic and when the dosing lever was operated there was an unpleasant sensation of drag-slip, drag-slip, drag-slip. only owned it a brief time. in fairness this machine was likely manufactured in the late 1970's and numerous improvements have been made to the model in the interim. have seen the pasquini moka and the anfim haus in person. these units have a much better fit and finish than the example i owned.

the plastic nameplate panel on the back is held in place with a spring wire. if you lift up the bottom edge of the panel with something like the tip of a table knife you will see how to disconnect it, affording a view of the interior.
Fortunately my doser seems to work well, and it has a metal floor, so it must must be an improved version. I will try opening up the grinder to see about the motor.
ideor wrote:anfim/anfin: perhaps the firm had a reorganisation at some point and the acronym changed.
I found a fascinitating article that tells some of the Anfim story, including its name change; here is an excerpt:
Tea & Coffee Trade Journal, November 1, 1997 wrote: Espresso made small but beautiful.

... within small businesses, viewpoint is what counts. Viewpoint finds expression in the quality of the end product and in how well it serves its purpose in the everyday marketplace. Mario Monfrini knows this well. His viewpoint on the business of making and serving espresso is both panoramic and finely focused. The focus is on coffee bean grinders manufactured by ANFIM, the small company he owns and manages.

ANFIM is located in the basement of an apartment building in a working class quarter of Milan. This also shapes viewpoint. ANFIM looks more like a neighborhood workshop than an industrial activity.

Nevertheless, ANFIM turns out more than 5,000 professional coffee grinders each year, and although the line is austere - six models plus a dosing unit - it covers the basic requirements, small to big-volume, of bar and shop.

Monfrini's view of the coffee business is truly wide angle. It started from the work he did with his father, beginning as a boy. The senior Monfrini was a bar owner and famous barista in Italy, even winning national competitions for best barman. He started Mario out letting him help on weekends behind the bar, operating a classic Faema E61. In time, Mario became a professional barman himself.

Mario's father opened a chain of some 1,000 bars in the Milan region, including some of the best. When he sold these, it was in order to become a roaster. He created Caffe Nilo, which in only 10 years grew to be the largest roasting company in Milan. Mario joined the firm and became a roaster himself. When his father sold Nilo and retired, Mario chose to take a 50% share in the well established but quite localized grinder manufacturing firm called ANFIN; he then changed the name to ANFIM when he took full control of the firm in 1990.

Monfrini's particular view of coffee, as barman and roaster, has resulted in some key changes in ANFIM grinders. Since taking over the company, he has emphasized simplicity and versatility; the operator can exchange hopper bins, for example, to upgrade volume; the grinding blade is purposefully not conical, the industry standard, but rather in a special ANFIM design that allows for very simple blade replacement.

But Monfrini's philosophy of grinding is actually centered secondarily on performance - as important as he knows that to be from his years behind the bar. His first concern is to care for the coffee being ground. This comes from the roaster in him, and he admits his heart is still in the coffee itself.

As part of this, when he took over ANFIM, one goal he set was to produce a grinder that would not overheat, or even burn the coffee as it was ground. He'd seen this regularly in the busy bars where he'd worked and knew it adversely affected cup quality. This meant adopting motors powerful enough and durable enough to sustain high volume usage without heating up. As a result, he says ANFIM was the first grinder manufacturer to go to slow revolution motors.

The most basic grinder in the ANFIM line is intended for a small bar or as a side grinder for decaffeinated service. The hopper capacity is 400 gm. but can be fitted with a kilo size container. Monfrini notes with some wonder that this model is reportedly even selling for home-use in California - he's been told there are movie stars using his grinders in their kitchens, which he finds to be awesome. This is the 'Best' model, and, like all the other grinders, can be had in a range of six colors.

ANFIM's number one selling machine is the Lusso, with 40 HP, 800 rpm, and grinder blade at 64 mm. It handles the typical volume of an average Italian espresso bar. For high-volume bars, there's the company's top model, the Special 450. It's driven by a 1 HP motor and operates at no more than 450 rpm. The grinder blade is 75 mm. Monfrini says that many of the busiest bars in Milan use a single 450 to feed two machines, or six serving groups, and grind more than 20 kg./day.

Although ANFIM grinders sell well in Spain, Israel, and New Zealand - and are beginning to sell in the U.S., France, and Germany - most of the business remains at home in Italy. ANFIM is in fact still Milan's hometown grinder. Monfrini says, with genuine pride, that the company holds 60% of the city's bar grinder market.
Apparently the switch from Anfin to Anfim occurred in 1990. The article also gives some insight into Anfim's design philosophy; e,.g., the emphasis on flat burrs and the emphasis on low rpm.

Thanks,
John

ideor

#15: Post by ideor »

hello john,

what a researcher! that is a most excellent article you found. had never known much about this manufacturer before.

to the list of espresso machine makers that use anfim can be added fregnan (elektra). while they have used petiziol (macap) and macdobar for their commercial needs for generations they use a proprietary version of the best for their home grinder. http://www.elektrasrl.com/casa-grinders.shtml

the elektra home model formerly came with a cast base and a small all-plastic doser. it had an eagle mounted on the backside of the body. do not recall the specific year it changed although it may have been 1994 as that was a major revamp year for the company with the launch of the barlume, etc.

ian bersten in his book " coffee floats, tea sinks" (1993) has a photo of an anfim lusso on page 240. he states that "they are very popular in milan."

thanks again for the excellent information. hope you are enjoying your new addition.

ideor

ideor

#16: Post by ideor »

john wrote: "the list of anfim rebranders is growing longer every day..."


one additional one is wega. before nello dal tio settled on compak as a companion for the wega range he employed the anfim lusso. a wega labelled lusso came up on ebay recently.

this list could probably get pretty long! :wink:
ideor

ideor

#17: Post by ideor »

vintage anfin bag grinder.

this just came to my in box from mathias steen in paris:

http://cgi.ebay.it/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vie ... B:EF:IT:11

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JB130

#18: Post by JB130 »

Very nice!

Besides Wega we can also add La Spaziale to the list, they have rebranded the Best and the Lusso. For the record, the complete (?) list:

ECM
Elektra
La Pavoni
La Spaziale
Olympia Express
Pasquini
Stafco
Vibiemme
Wega

ideor

#19: Post by ideor »

thanks very much john. nice job. :lol: la spaziale uses macap as well.

for many years the best was about the only intermediate duty grinder-doser on the market so it was used with a number of machines. 1988/9 was the time the offerings began to expand with launches such as the obel andrea.

in browsing craigslist last evening i discovered that every used best on offer is not so nice as yours:

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/bfs/434861417.html

listing possesses a levity inducing disconnect betwixt image and text... :wink:

Image
"Heavy duty commercial La Pavoni coffee grinder in great condition."



ideor

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JB130

#20: Post by JB130 »

Yikes, that is a scary looking doser!

And before anyone jumps on this one, be aware that it looks like the doser handle (thwacker) might be missing(?).

And for completeness, a La Spaziale recently seen on ebay:
Image