My hand grinder journey has ended - Page 2

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
LewBK

#11: Post by LewBK »

Shouldn't the title of this thread be: "My Hand Grinder Journey Has Ended-For Now"? Most people on this board ultimately can't resist continuing on their journey, and every time they say they've purchased their "end game" grinder wind up buying something else a year or so later.

jbviau
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#12: Post by jbviau »

Right?! My own hand grinder journey started in 2010 with the Hario Skerton and is still going...
"It's not anecdotal evidence, it's artisanal data." -Matt Yglesias

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LBIespresso
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#13: Post by LBIespresso replying to jbviau »

Mine started with the Skerton and setting it up to work with my drill was what I thought to be end game :lol:
LMWDP #580

wormraper

#14: Post by wormraper »

LewBK wrote:Shouldn't the title of this thread be: "My Hand Grinder Journey Has Ended-For Now"? Most people on this board ultimately can't resist continuing on their journey, and every time they say they've purchased their "end game" grinder wind up buying something else a year or so later.
this...always this. I have a crippling addiction to hand grinders. I started with an old no name Javapresse knockoff years ago, then moved to a Timemore C2... then a 1zpresso K series, a Q2 heptagonal, a Commandante, an 1zpresso X-Pro (just because it was new and shiny) and I have a J-Max on the way as we speak.

I still can't believe how much the hand grinder market has blown up. 10 years ago we have cheap mills and some minor forms of the Commandante MK1 (which wasn't that great)... now 1zpresso is churning out quality grinders that can actually rival much more expensive electric grinders and can do 58 mm portafilter espresso EASILY.... we never dreamed this would be the "norm" for hand grinders 10 years ago

malling

#15: Post by malling »

And we also got flatburr grinders as well if you asked anyone 10 years ago they would probably just laugh, shake their heads and say never going to happen

10 years ago selection was poor it was OE and really no one else, then year later it was Comandante followed by Made By Knock basically.

We can really thank those 3 for igniting the handgrinder scene.

But generally the coffee world has changed tremendously, we now don't mod big commercial grinders as we used to we now have SD grinder for every type of wallet, SD is big no one would have guessed where we are today 10 years ago.

AlexEvans

#16: Post by AlexEvans »

I got a pretty budget grinder - Timemore Chestnut C3.
For his low cost it's come with a great blades.

Jonk

#17: Post by Jonk »

I think Rosco deserves a mention for the early, premium build quality: Hand Grinder Showdown! Pharos - LIDO - Rosco

BSdV

#18: Post by BSdV »

I started with a porlex hand grinder that I somewhere read was a decent hand grinder.
It was way too slow for me so I quite quickly upgraded to a C40 MK3.
The difference in the cup was an eye opener. I never expected that a grinder could have such a massive impact on the taste.

Now we're a few years further, in the meantime we've bought a eureka specialita, still in the pour over period - and when I delved into espresso then this was upgraded to the Mazzer Major V. Specialita crapped out when I was away for work for a long time and in the meantime a baratza encore was purchased for pour over duty for my wife since I had the C40 with me when travelling.

Now I have a second C40 on the way. This time the MK4. I hope it will give me the same results as the MK3. One will be on pour over duty, while the other will be dedicated for espresso duty. Because the only real downside of this grinder to me is to frequently change between the different grind settings for espresso and poor over. Especially when using the red clix.

Some or perhaps many may not consider the C40 to be a good grinder for espresso, but together with the red clix and cafelat robot I've had the best tasting espresso's I ever had.

The fact that after grinding around 70 kg of medium roast SO beans the burrs still look like new gives me confidence this grinder is built to last. I'm sure there are other fantastic and perhaps better hand grinders out there but I really like the C40. Its construction, feel and grind quality/taste in the cup. Prefer the stainless steel with plastic frame over a solid cnc'd block of aluminium for some reason as well. Not sure how I'm going to like the plastic container on the MK4 but I can always swap it for glass. Some may feel that the glass container is very fragile but my C40 MK3 has fallen several times from my desk onto the floor/deck in my cabin when we suddenly hit crappy weather at sea and it never broke and the grinder is still as good as new.

So now my grinder journey has come to an end as well. Unless something spectecular would come around that would make a night and day difference over this already fantastic grinder. But I doubt it will.

ListlessWanderer619

#19: Post by ListlessWanderer619 »

wormraper wrote:I started with an old no name Javapresse knockoff years ago, then moved to a Timemore C2... then a 1zpresso K series, a Q2 heptagonal, a Commandante, an 1zpresso X-Pro (just because it was new and shiny) and I have a J-Max on the way as we speak.

How are you liking the X-Pro? How are the flavor profiles on it?

Jonk

#20: Post by Jonk »

BSdV wrote:I started with a porlex hand grinder that I somewhere read was a decent hand grinder.
Yeah, there has been a lot of bad advice around when it comes to grinders. My first was an 'award-winning' Bosch with 'faux burrs' that was so bad that there was just no point in buying specialty coffee. So I got a manual grinder, peddled as better because the slow speed didn't 'burn' the beans. It had dull, cast burrs and the axle was not stabilized so mostly it just meant more effort and frustration for a marginally better cup.

Many roasters don't want to emphasize the importance of the grinder, saying that it's all about the beans. I guess they don't want a high bar of entry, but it kept me from appreciating their products for years (coupled with the fact that many retailers sell stale beans). Hey, in the end it led me down the path of home roasting and the world of grinders :D

While I agree that the C40 is one of the good grinders, espresso included, it's just sad that you're compelled to buy a second grinder because they refuse to update the design. On many grinders with external adjustments, changing back and forth is a breeze.