Mazzer Kony - removing doser microswitch instructions

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
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Randy G.

Postby Randy G. » Feb 16, 2008, 7:42 pm

My Kony arrived a couple of days ago, and what a behemoth it is! I hope to have a user's report in a week or two to post here, but for now I thought I would share this mod that a lot of folks have done or talked about, but I think I came up with an easier method:

The doser has an enclosed microswitch, operated by a metal flap hanging from it that senses the level of ground coffee in the doser. When the doser is nearly full the flap is lifted and the grinder is shut off. That's great if you are making fifty to a hundred drinks an hour. For the rest of us living in the mortal world, there is rarely (if ever) any reason to grind so much coffee that the doser would be nearly filled. So what? The switch and it's flap sit directly in front of the exit chute and makes it a real pain to clean out leftover grounds in the chute. The solution is to remove the switch assembly, and here is an easily reversible method to do so:

1- Unplug machine (!).

2- Remove the bean hopper assembly and remove doser lid and place them out of the way.

3- use a 4.5mm socket (I used an extension with a 1/4" drive universal joint) and remove the two odd looking bolts which hold the doser to the body of the grinder. They are located, one to each side of the switch. If you do not have a 4.5mm socket, get one to avoid rounding the nuts. Put a towel on the doser forks and turn the doser sideways and lay it on the towel.

4- The switch is held to the doser body by two, small Phillips head screws that go in from behind. Remove the two screws.

5- Lay a towel down on the work surface and lay the grinder onto it's left side, power switch facing upwards, with the bottom facing you (take care with the doser as you tip the Kony over!). Unplug the Grinder!!!

6- Use a slot screwdriver and remove the grounds tray clip and then the four feet. The bottom will now come off easily exposing the wiring inside the Kony. Allow the bottom to lay flat on the work surface as seen here:

Image
The insides of the Kony are as impressive as the outside!

7- There are two gray wires attached to the junction strip on the base as indicated here:

Image

Loosen the two screws and pull these two wires free from the strip. The switch with wires attached can now be easily pulled out of the tie wrap and out of the machine. Pull from the switch end, and replace the two screws back into the back of the switch so that if so desired, the switch can be replaced at a later date. .

8- The switch is normally closed so you need to make a jumper wire to replace the switch as shown here:
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You may have to loosen the two little screws on the junction strip a bit more to get the wire fully inserted. Tighten the screws just tight enough to securely hold the wire but no further. Be sure that the conductor of the wire is fully concealed and that there are no loose strands of wire sticking out.

9- Reattach the bottom, making absolutely sure that no wires or anything else gets trapped between the base and the body of the Kony!

10- Be sure that the tie wrap that secured the two cables on the doser is not hung up (allow it to just drop into the grinder, still encircling the other cable), and reattach the doser to the body of the Kony.

That's it! The beauty of this method is that no wires are cut so the process can very easily be reversed in the future is so desired.
Espresso! My Espresso!
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com

caeffe

Postby caeffe » Feb 16, 2008, 8:38 pm

BTW, this method also applies to the Major (I've got one) and possibly the Super Jolly (can't say for sure since I don't have one). Wire colors may be different though, on my Major the wires were white.

User avatar
AndyS

Postby AndyS » Feb 16, 2008, 10:36 pm

Randy G. wrote:The doser has a switch with a flap hanging from it that senses the level of ground coffee in the doser. That's great if you are making fifty to a hundred drinks an hour. For the rest of us living in the mortal world, there is rarely (if ever) any reason to grind so much coffee that the doser would be nearly filled. The problem is that the switch and it's flap sits directly in front of the exit chute and makes it a real pain to clean out leftover grounds in the chute. The solution is to remove the switch, and here is an easily reversible method to do so:



Great description and photos, Mr. Glass!

One question, is a flap-ectomy covered by insurance?
-AndyS
VST refractometer/filter basket beta tester, no financial interest in the company

User avatar
Randy G.

Postby Randy G. » Feb 17, 2008, 12:37 am

AndyS wrote:Great description and photos, Mr. Glass!

One question, is a flap-ectomy covered by insurance?



Thanks for the kind words, Andy. They mean a lot coming from you.

But don't worry about the insurance. I have an HMO... Honduran Macchiato Organization. :roll:
Espresso! My Espresso!

http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com

matthyx

Postby matthyx » Feb 17, 2008, 6:57 am

The same trick works for the original Cimbali Max sold in Europe (I don't know for the Hybrid).

I did the same for my switch, then removed the finger guard and the plastic thingy (Dremel power) that supports both to clear the grind chute for cleaning.

User avatar
blu

Postby blu » Feb 17, 2008, 6:50 pm

hello,
I made an electrical diagram (inspired by jacob's diagram of the robur which helped me to understand the wiring there):

Image

removing the lock-mechanism of the relay makes the major stop grinding after letting go the "start"-switch from "start" to "1". otherwise the grinder doesn't stop.
as randy wrote above the "doser-full-stop-grinding" switch makes no sense at home. it can be removed (but in my eyes there is no need to remove it).
on the other hand IMO it's necessary to remove the "auto-start-grinding"-switch in the bottom of the doser. better: don't disassembly the switch - simply remove the black wiring...

cari saluti blu

ps might be interesting for you: http://www.popovic.info/html/mazzer_major/index.html

BradS

Postby BradS » Feb 18, 2008, 12:33 pm

blu wrote:hello,
I made an electrical diagram...



Great sketch, Blu!

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Jacob

Postby Jacob » Feb 18, 2008, 1:11 pm

Nice diagram Brad 8)

Blu did you end up buying a new motor for your Robur?

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Randy G.

Postby Randy G. » Feb 18, 2008, 2:41 pm

blu wrote:as randy wrote above the "doser-full-stop-grinding" switch makes no sense at home. it can be removed (but in my eyes there is no need to remove it).


IMO, in the home environment it does make sense to remove the switch completely, at least with the Kony. The switch-mount and flap block access to the exit chute of the grinding chamber. it is a LOT easier to clean out the chute with that out of the way. The entire job took me less than 30 minutes including taking the photos and rummaging out in the garage for a 4.5mm socket.

The original operation of the power switch is not optimum for the home user, but I have developed a working method that seems to make best use of it with my style of prep.
Espresso! My Espresso!

http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com

User avatar
blu

Postby blu » Feb 18, 2008, 4:19 pm

Jacob wrote:Blu did you end up buying a new motor for your Robur?

hi,
yes it's been ordered before xmas. still waiting for it...
cari saluti blu
@brad: excellent!