[PROMO] LeverCraft Ultra Grinder - Page 39

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
Pizzaandspro

#381: Post by Pizzaandspro »

Thanks for the reply. I might still have a shot at the Ultra if I ordered early enough! Crossing my fingers. I'll check out the Brentwood. I really really love the industrial look of the Ultra.

Just looked at the Brentwood and 4gs is a bit much imo.

ethiopianbuffman

#382: Post by ethiopianbuffman » replying to Pizzaandspro »

It is 2750

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bnw

#383: Post by bnw »

jevenator wrote:The next alternative is the Bentwood V63 that came to the U.S. market very recently.
How do you buy in the US? And how much does it cost?

Pizzaandspro

#384: Post by Pizzaandspro »

I guess there's a big difference between Bentwood and Brentwood! I'll put it 3rd on the list after the lagom.

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Jeff
Team HB

#385: Post by Jeff »

Further discussion of other grinders is more appropriate in their respective threads. I updated Bentwood Vertical 63 with some information.

Devrim

#386: Post by Devrim »

Hi all,

This is my first post, I'm also waiting on a reply from Eric, would like to buy the Ultra. Think its the best grinder out there because of its servo motor (no AC or DC could compete with it), zero retention, 98mm blind burrs and ease of getting them calibrated. Only drawback there is. is the separate driver for the servo motor, but you need it :)

Lets hope production continues!

CanadaCoffeeGuy

#387: Post by CanadaCoffeeGuy »

Devrim wrote:Think its the best grinder out there because of its servo motor (no AC or DC could compete with it), zero retention, 98mm blind burrs and ease of getting them calibrated. Only drawback there is. is the separate driver for the servo motor, but you need it :)
I know nothing of motors, can you explain in simple terms what makes the servo motor better than an AC or DC in a grinder application??

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Bluenoser
Supporter ♡

#388: Post by Bluenoser »

Servo motors spin internally, but, with control, are used to rotate their external shaft to a specific location. Like a stepper motor, but stepper motors have no feedback where servo motors do and are more precise. Servo motors are also known to have high torque. Internally, many of them are AC induction motors with encoders to sense shaft position, torque brakes and other 'stuff'. Now to keep a servo motor 'spinning' you need a smart controller.. I would think some type of microprocessor/firmware so it keeps sending the next position to the shaft. Electronically more complex than a simpler DC or AC motor. I think the benefit is that you might get a more even grind as the torque is high and may not slow down when it hits a hard bean.. But I have no experience with servo motors, so what I know is only from what I've read. I don't think too many grinders use servo motors because they need a smart controller.. However, these days, smart controllers are plentiful. A common application of servos is in robotics & CNC machines.

ira
Supporter ♡

#389: Post by ira »

I believe the advantage of a servo motor here is 2 things, the ability to control speed along with being able to mount the burrs on the motor shaft. All the other speed controlled grinders use some sort of transmission and a second shaft to mount the burrs. They can also get away with much less powerful motors because of the gearing. Another potential advantage of connecting the burrs directly to the motor shaft is alignment, the bearing in a motor are far apart making the axis of the motors shaft unlikely to allow any movement except rotation.

Ira

Devrim

#390: Post by Devrim »

Exactly, servo motors never change speed or torque, that is always constant. I think the heat produced by a servo is less, which also is a big advantage. Is there any grinder out there with a servo motor?

Too bad Levercraft Coffee is closed/bankrupt? Think it has to do with Mr. Zhang not delivering :(