Kinu M47 bearings noise - Page 4

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
jpender

#31: Post by jpender »

Ira, I wasn't responding to you specifically. But since you bring it up... I don't think you can say with any certainty that a dropped aluminum grinder wouldn't damage a floor either. Or that the floor damage from dropping a steel grinder would necessarily be more expensive to repair than the cost of the grinder.

Durability is something worth paying for, for sure. But it's the normal wear and tear kind of durability that matters the most. People don't buy coffee equipment based on how badly things will go if it hits the floor.

John_Doe

#32: Post by John_Doe »

I agree somewhat, but of course aluminum can stand up to harsh daily use with grinders, etc. Look at how many electric commercial grinders have aluminum motor frames, grind/burr housings, etc. I'm sure the Kinu Classic is a nice/solid hand grinder, just couldn't see paying that much for stainless over high quality aluminum that will work just as well and last just as long in this case. Also, not a fan of German whatever, so will pass on the over-engineering arrogance too!

LewBK

#33: Post by LewBK »

Kinu's Romanian. I just broke my Hario carafe, admittedly glass! I've never dropped my Kinu, but have seen it roll off the countertop onto the floor. No floor damage but I was glad it was steel then. I also think portable grinders which can be thrown in backpacks and suitcases, crushed under other backpacks and suitcases on planes and cars, and easily dropped with wet hands should be more durable than a standing countertop espresso machine or grinder.

John_Doe

#34: Post by John_Doe » replying to LewBK »

German designed, manufactured in Romania FWIW. I will let you know how well the 1ZPresso is doing a few decades from now.

Yan

#35: Post by Yan »

sassypants15 wrote:By cleaning I mean that I brush it out after a week of use. I did contact kinu and they want me to send a video or a picture of the ball bearing. I did not remove the bearings that hold the shaft and I've never taken out the inner burr. I do swap out the pour over burr and espresso burr as needed. I put a small amount of vegetable oil on the ball and it seemed to be a little better . Thanks for all the input .
So you already solve your problems, glad to hear that...btw you already use the Pour over burr, what is your impression? Do you like the results in the cup?

ira
Supporter ♡

#36: Post by ira »

jpender wrote:Ira, I wasn't responding to you specifically. But since you bring it up... I don't think you can say with any certainty that a dropped aluminum grinder wouldn't damage a floor either.
Agreed but there is also no reason a stainless steel grinder should be better than an aluminium one and I thought that was a equally ridiculous and pointless response.

Ira

LewBK

#37: Post by LewBK »

That's right the aluminum 1zpresso JE Plus is so much sturdier than steel that it has come dinged just from shipping to buyers:

1Zpresso JE Plus

Image

jpender

#38: Post by jpender »

ira wrote:Agreed but there is also no reason a stainless steel grinder should be better than an aluminium one and I thought that was a equally ridiculous and pointless response.

I don't disagree. Kinu makes an aluminum grinder (the Traveler). And I bought a plastic grinder (the Kinu Phoenix). All else being equal a bombproof steel grinder is more resilient. But does it really matter? Maybe, if you're buying a grinder for the long haul. But if you expect technology to offer improvements that will be seductive long before decades have past then it's kind of a moot point. Cosmetic divots on the outside of an aluminum grinder? Who cares? Damage to your floor? Seriously??

John_Doe

#39: Post by John_Doe »

LewBK wrote:That's right the aluminum 1zpresso JE Plus is so much sturdier than steel that it has come dinged just from shipping to buyers:

1Zpresso JE Plus

image
No idea what happened there, but that part of mine is flawless.

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radu

#40: Post by radu »

jpender wrote:I don't disagree. Kinu makes an aluminum grinder (the Traveler). And I bought a plastic grinder (the Kinu Phoenix). All else being equal a bombproof steel grinder is more resilient. But does it really matter? Maybe, if you're buying a grinder for the long haul. But if you expect technology to offer improvements that will be seductive long before decades have past then it's kind of a moot point. Cosmetic divots on the outside of an aluminum grinder? Who cares? Damage to your floor? Seriously??
Totally agree with you.

Also, be it steel or aluminium, if it falls on a hard floor it will sustain damage. Maybe if you're lucky (with a plastic cup model, like the Simplicity), it will fall on the cup and only that will sustain damage. Other than that, things will bend or break. The Classic and Simplicity are close to 1kg. There is a lot of impact force when a 1kg hard object falls on a hard floor. You can say that the aluminium Traveler will damage the floor less, since it's about 600g, but it'll still dent a hardwood floor. That's just life.

They are well built, heavy grinders that are made with a lot of precision. Precision = sensitive. You can't drop a micrometer gauge on the floor and expect it to remain calibrated. Also, small scratches can be buffed with abrasive pads (like a piece of Scotch Brite abrasive hand pads).
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