Hacking the DF64 exit chute - Page 2

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
999mor
Posts: 22
Joined: 2 years ago

#11: Post by 999mor »

Awesome work!
Do you think of going commurtial with this upgrade? I would Definitely pay for a ready set

GDM528 (original poster)
Posts: 850
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#12: Post by GDM528 (original poster) replying to 999mor »

I considered offering it as a kit, but it would take dozens of orders for the economics to make sense.

999mor
Posts: 22
Joined: 2 years ago

#13: Post by 999mor »

I found a nice guy with sla printer to print me one of these. Really looking forward to installing it.
Couple of things I thought of.
There is no sla resin that is food safe, so thinking to cover the parts with food safe epoxy resin. Hope it won't effect the performance.
The clump crusher supposed to help with the static as well, so to avoid changing too much pressure along the chute going to drills 6 or 8 holes near the expeller blades (around the elliptical part) and to use stainless steel wire connected to the bolts for grounding and to make easy flow clump crusher that resembles the mazzer type clump crusher and hope this going to help with the static.
My grinder is on the 10 degree tilt base, and angled cup holder so the next 2 parts won't fit me (maybe without the middle part, we'll see) so really hoping the steinless wire will make a difference

ZackAdam
Posts: 15
Joined: 2 years ago

#14: Post by ZackAdam »

Just installed it on my df64 and i must say it works great.
Also the fit was perfect!

No clumps, the coffee spills faster, and i don't feel it introduces more static than before.

Side note- the original clump crusher had a lot of stale coffee behind it, I was actually surprised because you'd think it'll be minimal.


One question though- I don't know exactly the resin composition that the 3d printing place used (it's black with bunch of lines). I did asked for a food safe material, how dangerous can it be?

GDM528 (original poster)
Posts: 850
Joined: 2 years ago

#15: Post by GDM528 (original poster) »

999mor wrote:There is no sla resin that is food safe, so thinking to cover the parts with food safe epoxy resin. Hope it won't effect the performance.
The clump crusher supposed to help with the static as well, so to avoid changing too much pressure along the chute going to drills 6 or 8 holes near the expeller blades (around the elliptical part) and to use stainless steel wire connected to the bolts for grounding and to make easy flow clump crusher that resembles the mazzer type clump crusher and hope this going to help with the static.
SLA resin is used to make teeth aligners, so there are resins that are rated as biocompatible. I confess the resin I used was Formlab's clear resin because it's much cheaper than their dental resin. That's why there'd need to be dozens of buyers to support selling prefabricated chutes.

Even though my resin isn't rated as biocompatible, I still consider it safer than my barrel-aged bottle of rum. Or bacon. Or pizza. The most common metal in contact with the coffee I drink is aluminum - which is linked to early onset Alzheimer's... I'm just gonna enjoy my coffee in the meantime ;)

One of my earlier trials involved electrically-grounded wires in the exit chute just as you describe. Epic fail. Virtually no impact on static, then it triggered a truly massive clog. The grounds just need to GTFO IMHO.

I suspect a key reason the clump crusher (factory and user mods) reduces static, is it slows down the grinds in the chamber to give them a eensy bit more time to dissipate static charge. However, I didn't like the idea of the expeller blades giving the grinds repeated beat-downs as they squeeze through the flow restrictor / 'clump crusher'. I had to adjust my grind finer post-mod.

GDM528 (original poster)
Posts: 850
Joined: 2 years ago

#16: Post by GDM528 (original poster) »

999mor wrote:My grinder is on the 10 degree tilt base, and angled cup holder so the next 2 parts won't fit me (maybe without the middle part, we'll see) so really hoping the steinless wire will make a difference
Doh! I have a version of the downspout for titled bases. I didn't think that many peeps were using it. I'll work on adding that version to the CAD data I posted.

The biggest difference I've noted with the tilted base, is not having to pump out the grounds - they simply fall through more easily. But I wasn't really suffering over having to tap the bellows a bit - plus it gave me extra peace of mind knowing I've removed all the grounds for sure.

Tilting the base also changes the landing zone for the dosing cup / portafilter into an awkward location - nothing a bit of 3D printing can't solve ;)

GDM528 (original poster)
Posts: 850
Joined: 2 years ago

#17: Post by GDM528 (original poster) »

ZackAdam wrote:Just installed it on my df64 and i must say it works great.
Also the fit was perfect!

No clumps, the coffee spills faster, and i don't feel it introduces more static than before.

Side note- the original clump crusher had a lot of stale coffee behind it, I was actually surprised because you'd think it'll be minimal.


One question though- I don't know exactly the resin composition that the 3d printing place used (it's black with bunch of lines). I did asked for a food safe material, how dangerous can it be?
Yay, and *whew* ! I can inhale now, I was worried it would be a fit/installation nightmare, as I don't have a lot of confidence in the precision of the metal-cast parts of the DF64.

What sort of trimming was required? I had to file open the aperture of the black metal cover plate so the new downspout could pass through.

Formlabs does sell a biocompatible resin intended for dental aligners, which could be used to allay concerns for a commercial version of the exit chute. Nonetheless there is a lot of online information detailing the safety issues, with varying levels of concern. A liquid that turns solid just from light exposure is kinda magical, and therefore kinda spooky, ala Medusa. I'm not necessarily qualified to comment on the safety implications of properly cured UV resin, as my attitude is more aligned with "Pink shirt guy":


ZackAdam
Posts: 15
Joined: 2 years ago

#18: Post by ZackAdam »

Well installing it was a bit of a chore (I'm used to my previous ceado e5p that was so much easy to disassemble).

I unscrewed the top burr, the black front plate the base of tge grinder and unscrewed the start/stop button. Only then I had access to the stock chute and the (nasty) clump crusher.

Getting the 3d printed chute wasn't too difficult, I fiddled with it a bit and screwed it tight so it won't buldge too much, closed everything up and it fit nicely.

Really good job!

GDM528 (original poster)
Posts: 850
Joined: 2 years ago

#19: Post by GDM528 (original poster) replying to ZackAdam »

Cool, glad it's working out for you.

I'd appreciate any data on retention with the new chute. My scale only reads down to 0.1 grams and I've not been able to measure any change, as in, zero retention - too good to be true?

999mor
Posts: 22
Joined: 2 years ago

#20: Post by 999mor »

GDM528 wrote:Doh! I have a version of the downspout for titled bases. I didn't think that many peeps were using it. I'll work on adding that version to the CAD data I posted.

The biggest difference I've noted with the tilted base, is not having to pump out the grounds - they simply fall through more easily. But I wasn't really suffering over having to tap the bellows a bit - plus it gave me extra peace of mind knowing I've removed all the grounds for sure.

Tilting the base also changes the landing zone for the dosing cup / portafilter into an awkward location - nothing a bit of 3D printing can't solve ;)
Awesome! Looking forward to it. So the printing on hold for now.

So, do you think that the epoxy resin is not needed?