Eureka Mignon Turbo (also for French press and filter?)

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
hjhr

#1: Post by hjhr »

I have a chance to get a good deal on the Mignon Turbo as my first coffee grinder.

Online (Facebook), Eureka says that the Specialità has a "PRODUCTIVITY" for both espresso and brew, but that the Turbo does not (screenshot 1).

In comparison, all the differences I can see in the models are the following:
1. the burr diameters are larger on the Turbo (65mm vs 55mm), and,
2. the motor is stronger on the Turbo (screenshot 2 for the XL and screenshot 3) being 1630 RPM vs 1350 RPM

My needs: espresso, french press and hopefully (?) filter.

And, my question then becomes, will the Turbo work for french press and filter?

I simply do not understand how the larger burr and a stronger engine can get in the way of this :?




K7

#2: Post by K7 »

Ha! I didn't know they offered 65mm burrs in non-"Oro" SKU. So this is basically the Oro XL at more affordable price point. Nice.

The burrs are optimized for espresso, but if the Turbo is like other Mignons, you should be able to grind for FP and filter. You would need to turn the adjustment knob more than one full turn. Because the burrs are espresso-focused, you get more fines than if you had filter-focused burrs (e.g. Mignon Filtro, Brew Pro, Zero Brew, etc.) but you can probably find recipes/techniques to work with. To switch between espresso and FP/filter, you would need to purge enough coffee to get rid of leftover grounds from previous setting (quite wasteful if switching frequently). Some say going back to the exact previous espresso setting is problematic, but in my experience can be done reliably if you remember the exact position and be consistent in the way you turn the knob. I always first go a bit finer than the target and then reach the exact target counterclockwise direction. For convenience, reduced waste and fines, many do end up getting a separate grinder for filter/FP.

hjhr (original poster)

#3: Post by hjhr (original poster) »

The XL model has special "Pure Diamond" burrs, while the Turbo model has standard hardened steel burrs.

The Perfetto model is able to make a range of coffee grinds for different brewing methods (see screenshot). Is it possible that the Perfetto's adjustment knob is less sensitive and covers a larger range of grind sizes compared to the XL and Turbo models?

Since the Turbo and Perfetto models cost the same (in my case), it may be a better value to choose the Turbo model with its larger burrs and more power.


K7

#4: Post by K7 »

hjhr wrote:The XL model has special "Pure Diamond" burrs, while the Turbo model has standard hardened steel burrs.
Ah, I see.
The Perfetto model is able to make a range of coffee grinds for different brewing methods (see screenshot). Is it possible that the Perfetto's adjustment knob is less sensitive and covers a larger range of grind sizes compared to the XL and Turbo models?
Yes, I believe the Perfetto's adjustment knob lets you cover the whole espresso to FP range in one turn. Downside is you don't have as fine control for espresso. But perhaps it's still good enough. Specialita/XL/Turbo knob lets you make extremely fine adjustments.
Since the Turbo and Perfetto models cost the same (in my case), it may be a better value to choose the Turbo model with its larger burrs and more power.
Probably true especially if espresso is important to you.

hjhr (original poster)

#5: Post by hjhr (original poster) »

K7 wrote: Probably true especially if espresso is important to you.
It isn't at this very moment, I'm just entering the world of coffee...
but I do want espresso to become just that (and it might just be)

So I want too keep my options open :wink:

Espressofilo

#6: Post by Espressofilo »

I have a Eureka Mignon Libra and I don't think that is the right choice if you give the same importance to brew and espresso. That probably applies to many Eureka models, due to the indirect way they have to set the burrs distance.
As I relate in my review of the grinder*, "jumping" from extremes of the grinder settings, from Espresso to French press, is quite unpractical, the grinder remains easily stuck by fragments of coffee beans between the burrs, which means that you have to do some grinding every few positions.

The review is here: My disappointing experience with the Eureka Mignon Libra

If you need to alternate espresso and French press I think a grinder which lets you operate the distance between the burrs with your hands is more practical, you will "grind" any coffee fragment with your own hands while turning the knob. This kind of grinder is usually less practical when you open it for maintenance, because the upper burr is the one which is moved and when you reassemble the grinder you have lost your "zero" point and you have to set it again, but it's more practical when you make wild swings in fineness of grinding.

In any case I suggest you first download the user manual of the model you are planning to buy. I also suggest you avoid any "stepped" grinder if you want to dwell into the espresso world. "Stepped" and "espresso" don't fit well together.