Duranium burrs for Mazzer Super Jolly grinder

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
mteahan

#1: Post by mteahan »

While I still believe conicals rule, but not everyone can afford them.

We just received four samples of mills made from a new alloy for test. Those that have visited us know that the testing here is limited to as much coffee as Angelo and I can drink--which is only so much--so we need some outside assistance here.

This project may fit.

These mills are supposed to last much longer, they have a remarkably different finish--appearing more like stainless steel due to the titanium content--and are much sharper than the original Mazzer mills. A lot sharper, actually. These are not the gold titanium treated mills we have seen before, but an entirely different alloy.

We can spare ONE SET for the Mazzer Super Jolly. It would ship with a box of the proprietary grinder cleaning crystals developed by Asachimici. We would need to have the mills back after the test to see how they weathered the usage and we need to find a high volume location to evaluate their performance over time.

Anyone interested?

Michael Teahan
Espresso Resource
818-786-7179



Split from Titan Grinder Project by moderator...
Michael Teahan
analogue | coffee

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HB
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#2: Post by HB »

mteahan wrote:We can spare ONE SET for the Mazzer Super Jolly.
We have a Super Jolly among the TGP grinders. Currently it's with me, the next stop is Jim Schulman's. If you are interested in loaning them to the TGP, please contact me. I would be able to arrange a side-by-side comparison by borrowing another Super Jolly. It might also be interesting to compare the grind difference, if any, in the next round of particle size analysis.
Dan Kehn

mteahan

#3: Post by mteahan »

Dan,

The Duranium Mills are on their way (I think that is a metal used on the Star Ship Enterprise); you will have them in your hands next week.
Michael Teahan
analogue | coffee

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HB
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#4: Post by HB »

Thanks Michael, I will try to scare up a set of worn Super Jolly burrs for comparison. Lino may have some burrs leftover from the truckload of TagEx grinders we bought off eBay a couple years back.
Dan Kehn

mteahan

#5: Post by mteahan »

While new against old is important, I would like to know if this new material and cutting surface offers any advantage over the stock metal.

Since most of the grinders have mills that needed to be replaced three years ago, anything kind of old should suffice.

We have one customer (not in the U.S.) that buys over 1,000 mill sets a year for their customers, and that's just one brand. The U.S. is not very kind to their grinders.
Michael Teahan
analogue | coffee

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HB
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#6: Post by HB »

mteahan wrote:While I still believe conicals rule, but not everyone can afford them.

We just received four samples of mills made from a new alloy for test. Those that have visited us know that the testing here is limited to as much coffee as Angelo and I can drink--which is only so much--so we need some outside assistance here.

This project may fit.

These mills are supposed to last much longer, they have a remarkably different finish--appearing more like stainless steel due to the titanium content--and are much sharper than the original Mazzer mills. A lot sharper, actually. These are not the gold titanium treated mills we have seen before, but an entirely different alloy.
Below is a photo of one of the new Duranium burrs you sent:

Image

And the stock burr:

Image

Tomorrow I will install them on the Super Jolly I've been evaluating as part of the TGP to break them in for a few days, then try some side-by-side tests with Lino's Super Jolly (estimated burr wear of 30-50 pounds). If you look very very carefully, there is a small difference in the cutting pattern. Specifically, the coarse grinding edges do not extend as deeply for the new burrs.
Dan Kehn

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another_jim
Team HB

#7: Post by another_jim »

It may just be the photograph angles, but the burrs seem subtly different in shape. The new ones appear more radial (less slanted away fron the radius of the circle)
Jim Schulman

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HB
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#8: Post by HB »

To avoid distortion, the two photos above are actually from the same frame. I split them to show them larger in the post. You could go blind trying to see the difference, but I believe you're right about the straighter angle of the first cutting edges. The number of "wedges" and pattern are unchanged.
Dan Kehn

mteahan

#9: Post by mteahan »

Regarding the angle and pitch of the Mazzer mill sets; the OEM is less aggressive on the initial grind (inner most teeth) and slightly more so on the final cut. It would be interesting to see if there is a difference and if any of that can be attributed to the cutting angle.

Dan,

Don't forget to give the other samples a try and tell us what you think. Coffee Colors printed a review of the Puly Grind, but in true form, the translation bites.
Michael Teahan
analogue | coffee

mteahan

#10: Post by mteahan »

And yet. . . .

The manufacturer of the Duranium mills in Italy appreciated the report from Dan that the tolerance of the retention ring of the mill was 0.05mm too tight and needed a little persuasion to seat. It was close enough that not everyone might experience it, but an easy fix nonetheless.

They are also anxious to discover the results of the particle analysis to see how the pattern compares. They simply tasted it, I think.

While the Home Barista does operate in an environment alien to most commercial users, the enthusiasm and quest for understanding is not matched outside Italian factories. And then not even in some of them.

What you guys do has more value than you think.

And I am glad to discover most have outgrown the flatline brew temp fad.
Michael Teahan
analogue | coffee