Ceado's new single dosing grinder: E37SD - Page 14

Grinders are one of the keys to exceptional espresso. Discuss them here.
c1raider

#131: Post by c1raider »

Can't wait for some comparisons with the EG1 and monoliths!

espressoking

#132: Post by espressoking »

@cameronaustin did you receive your e37sd grinder ?
Courious about your first experience ...

cameronaustin

#133: Post by cameronaustin »

Yes. I have been using it for a week or so. I hope to post a video soon, but for now I'll share a few impressions.

Output Consistency (corrected from mistakenly using the term Retention) Commonly getting the same weight out of the machine that I put in.

Retention: I opened the machine after I used it for a few days, and there is coffee grinds in the screw heads and some of the other voids in the grinding chamber. Whether these grinds get flushed out with every grind, or stay in there for a long time, I have no idea. The total volume of this retention is much lower than with the E37J.

Static and Distribution - I have been using RDT - and it works well. Fun fact - it adds .1-.2 grams to the "input" weight. I previously used WDT with my E37J, and it hasn't been necessary. I've been pulling shots with a bottomless portafilter, and the shots are pretty textbook visually.

Speed - I haven't actually timed it. But for 18.5 grams of coffee in, I think it is taking about 4-5 seconds, and then the grinder has to "wind down"... which takes a few seconds.

Cleanliness of workspace - You can use the (provided) brush to get (what I've measured a few times to be) .1-.2 grams of coffee out of the spout. The brush is really effective. I have not BTW, been using the rubber spout sheath. If you use the (supplied) cup to catch the grinds like shown in the video, all the grinds go it the cup vs. on the counter. The whole grinding process can be done very neatly (clean).

Dial in - it took me 4 shots to dial in to a 1:2 ratio and a 25-30 second pull, which has been a happy place for the coffees that I have been using and the Profitec 700. I am pretty new to espresso and this seemed pretty fast.

Taste - I can't say that I notice a big difference between the "taste" of the primary coffee I have been using between the E37SD and the E37J. My guess is that folks with a more developed palate might have more insight here.

Moving away from a hopper - this was one of the main reasons that I wanted a single dosing grinder. While the speed of making "the next coffee" with a hopper—based set up is in fact really fast, the pain-point for me was either grinding through (wasting) a bunch of coffee in the machine when I wanted to switch beans or turning the grinder upside down and shaking out all the unground coffee. Those days are gone for me. This machine is a keeper for this point alone - it just fits my usage pattern better.

Worm screw adjuster vs. the slider - as others have reported, the precision of the worm screw is like a version upgrade in software. Just way, way better and insanely incremental (reflective of the design).

Let me know if you have any questions.
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espressoking

#134: Post by espressoking »

Thanks a lot @cameronaustin

Did you try it with some light roasted beans already?

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Moka 1 Cup

#135: Post by Moka 1 Cup »

Thanks. One thing that caught my eye, and I am looking forward to watch the video, is the Cleanliness of workspace . The 0.1g-0.2g on the counter that you mentioned and if I understood correctly, which is the equivalent of one or two beans, seems a lot to me. Not that I doubt it, I am just surprised, even though my experience with electric grinders is only limited to two models.
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cameronaustin

#136: Post by cameronaustin »

espressoking wrote:Thanks a lot @cameronaustin

Did you try it with some light roasted beans already?
I have not used any light roast beans...yet.

My personal flavor profile is (currently) medium-to-darker roast, partially based on my "newbie" status with espresso. I have just not been exposed to much of the "lighter" side of the new world of coffee (yet)... and my previous grinder set up just didn't quite match my needs and interest to experiment more broadly (including lighter roast).

This is one of the reasons I have moved to a "higher" end single doser - so I can more flexibly and readily experiment - get a professional-quality grind - and hopefully discover a taste / liking / appreciation for other parts of the coffee world that I don't know about, yet.

SO - It's a brave new world. Discovery "engaged"!

Off topic, but, if there is a "gateway light roast coffee" recommendation - for newbies like me currently enjoying medium/darks - I would appreciate the recommendation(s).

Thx.

cameronaustin

#137: Post by cameronaustin »

Moka 1 Cup wrote:Thanks. One thing that caught my eye, and I am looking forward to watch the video, is the Cleanliness of workspace . The 0.1g-0.2g on the counter that you mentioned and if I understood correctly, which is the equivalent of one or two beans, seems a lot to me. Not that I doubt it, I am just surprised, even though my experience with electric grinders is only limited to two models.
I think that you may have misunderstood what I was attempting to communicate.

When using the supplied cup to catch the coffee grinds, ALL the coffee grinds go into the cup when exiting the grinder - there is NO over-shooting or spillage on the counter. None.

There are some coffee grinds that are trapped "in the spout" and which require (the supplied) brush to be used to manually to brush those grinds out of the spout (and likely the edge of the actual grinding chamber accessible with the brush). I am estimating these "in the spout grinds" to be about .1 - .2 grams, max. These "brushed out grinds" easily flow directly into the same retrieval cup, and not on the counter.

Hopefully, that clears it up. No coffee - anywhere but in the cup - that you then transfer to your portafilter.

Clean workspace. Yeah!

BTW - @Moka 1 Cup - You sound like the most interesting person - "Interests: Espresso & Bourbon, Cigars & Pipes, Hunting & Beretta, Jeep & Vespa"... we gotta meet up some time. Thanks for your post!!

c1raider

#138: Post by c1raider »

While using a brush to get the last bit of grinds out may not be an inconvenience for most I'm coming from a Compak K10 and my two main gripes are brushing the shoot and thwacking the doser for every dose. Looks like I may need to pony up for the LWW EG-1.

KonaViewCoffee

#139: Post by KonaViewCoffee »

Aloha,
Some background:
I am a coffee farmer in Kona on the big island of Hawaii. I roast on a Giesen W6A for our farm's coffee business as well as for other farms. I have a Bunn G2 for commercial bulk grinding. I have a Ceado E92 for an espresso grinder as well as a Sette 270. We roast to order and I always have freshly roasted coffee left over. Still the retention of the Ceado E92 and rough grind size adjustment is tiresome. I have been using the Sette 270 for single dosing espresso and have basically been happy with it. Single dosing for espresso allows me to have several roasts with differing roast profiles that I can easily blend and make adjustments to.

I use the Bunn for our benchmark grinder to judge brewed coffee roast profiles. My wife and I are not cuppers and we use brewed coffee to judge our roasts. We used to do pour over but needed something easier, quicker and repeatable. We now use a Behmor Connect as our benchmark brewer primarily because is has altitude compensation as well as a programmable bloom time (our farm is at a 1,500 ft. elevation.) The Bunn does an OK job but it is in a different location from where I grind espresso.

To the point:
I am considering buying the Ceado E37SD. My aim is to use this grinder for an espresso benchmark but also have it be my benchmark for an auto brewer or pour over. The worm gear that moves out of the way to make large grind size adjustments looks perfect. It does seem like it would be quite repeatable.

I am also considering the Monolith Flat. The adjustable speed is of interest but I am not sure how important that it in the end. My main concern is that the Monolith's grind size scale looks pretty macro. I feel that it would be a challenge to use it repeatably to switch from pour over to espresso and back.

I really like conicals - both the Ceado and the Sette. My hope is that I will be happy switching to a Titan flat - especially the 83mm titanium burrs of the new Ceado. Not wanting to start a conical vs flat war here but just raise the issue. It is an important decision to make and I am looking forward to the expertise of the group. One poster here said that the Monolith Flat did not compare well with the Ceado E37SD. I would be interested in any feedback along these lines.

def
Supporter ♡

#140: Post by def »

KonaViewCoffee wrote:I am also considering the Monolith Flat. The adjustable speed is of interest but I am not sure how important that it in the end. My main concern is that the Monolith's grind size scale looks pretty macro. I feel that it would be a challenge to use it repeatably to switch from pour over to espresso and back.
I do not have a E37SD, but I used an E37S for several months, espresso grind only. It is a great grinder. I switched to Monolith Flat and Conical, and I quickly realized that I prefer the workflow and benefits of single dosing with the Monoliths. Switching between different grinds, particularly from espresso to brew or vice-versa is the Monolith's forte. Both Flat and Conical Monolith offer very fine and precise adjustments and are consistently the same. For example, if you go from a 3.2 setting, to a brew grind setting, then back to 3.2, you will get the exact same grind as before. They are very simple to use, and really I have not once been frustrated when using Monolith grinders. I sold all of my other grinders, including the MC3, because I can grind everything from Turkish to cold brew on my SSP Flat. That said, I would never use a Monolith for a high volume application such as a cafe.