Any grinder with a solution for reducing oxidation of beans in the hopper?

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boren

#1: Post by boren »

I much prefer grinding on-demand compared to single-dosing, but oxidation is an issue. This is why I don't normally leave more than one day's worth of beans in the hopper. Is there any grinder that provides some mechanism to reduce this issue?

I assume a piston like that used in AirScape containers could potentially be used for that, with a suitable hopper shape. Getting the beans to drop onto the burrs with a flat bottom hopper may be a challenge, as would the air that comes through the burrs, but still these look like engineering problems worth solving. The current state where hoppers are mostly full of air is far from optimal.

LObin

#2: Post by LObin »

Single dosing grinders!
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Marcelnl
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#3: Post by Marcelnl »

for that reason I am using a micro hopper, it contains enough beans for about half a day's to a day's worth of doubles. No oxidation, no single dosing!
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boren (original poster)

#4: Post by boren (original poster) »

This sounds interesting Marcelnl. Can you share a picture?

Thanks!

Marcelnl
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#5: Post by Marcelnl »

Imagine a rolled up acetate baking foil stuck in the opening in the collar :lol: I can make a picture but it's as down to earth as it sounds
Slightly bigger diameter than the core of a toilet paper roll, or I'd have used that.
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Nunas
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#6: Post by Nunas »

I've often wondered about this too, and so I generally only partly fill my hopper. But, I think that what you're seeking does not exist. Even if one could hermetically seal the hopper, there would still be a free flow of at least some air from the bottom up, past the burrs. Or am I missing something here?

jpender

#7: Post by jpender »

I don't think you're missing anything. Oxygen would work it's through any opening. Even if you could seal it there somehow in between the beans being ground I'm not convinced that an Airscape type of storage system is particularly effective in the first place. Even when you remove the head space in a container there is still a lot of air in between the beans, enough to fully stale them. While a container without any head space would take longer to go stale initially the oxidation rate would be very similar to an open container. I think it just doesn't help enough. Consider James Hoffmann's recent video attempt to taste the difference.

I think that the only way to do this would be with inert gas and some way to seal the bottom in between grinds. And that would almost certainly be expensive and complicated.
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Marcelnl
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#8: Post by Marcelnl »

Nunas wrote:I've often wondered about this too, and so I generally only partly fill my hopper. But, I think that what you're seeking does not exist. Even if one could hermetically seal the hopper, there would still be a free flow of at least some air from the bottom up, past the burrs. Or am I missing something here?
I also wondered about that and concluded that hermetically sealing well enough to keep oxygen that is constantly creeping in anyway would require a constant influx of inert gas, CO2 or N2...not easy to do so I opted for having so much beans in the hopper as I'm using in a day as I arbitrarily used that as cutoff for oxidation (never tasted old beans within a day, IMO it takes like 2-3 days for beans in the open to oxidize enough to taste it)
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melnik

#9: Post by melnik »


From here https://dailycoffeenews.com/2019/11/14/ ... k-quality/

jevenator

#10: Post by jevenator »

Bentwood advertises
"Extra durable hopper, with special closing mechanism to reduce oxidation of beans "
I think it's supposed to be an airtight seal so the beans are "stuck" with that air and no more new air is introduced.