Would it be possible to install a resin filter inside (to the inlet) of the Profitec Pro 600/700 water reservoir?

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a_k9

#1: Post by a_k9 »

Java Jim describes the process in this video.
I am considering this as an option to soften the water. I read somewhere that it is possible to install such a filter using a supplied intake tube in a Profitec 300. Do all ECM/Profitec semi-automatic machines come with such tubes? If not where can I buy such a part?

JRising

#2: Post by JRising »

For those water reservoirs you could put any silicon hose of the right size onto the metal piece in the bottom and have it drawing the water through a "bestcup" style of softener:
https://www.espressoplanet.com/coffee-a ... ilter.html
Or any of those that are similar to the one in your video.

Or replace the fitting in the bottom of the reservoir with the ECM filter adaptor:
https://www.espressoplanet.com/ECM-Arom ... P6024.html
and use the ECM Brita filter/softeners.
https://www.espressoplanet.com/ECM-Arom ... 89445.html
They last a year and should be recharged every couple of weeks.

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homeburrero
Team HB

#3: Post by homeburrero »

Good advice from JRising about fitting these filters. However ...
JRising wrote:They last a year and should be recharged every couple of weeks.
I would disagree with that. BWT doesn't explicitly say, but their Bestcup Premium is almost certainly a WAC resin decarbonizing filter and not a conventional SAC resin (sodium ion exchange) softener.

The ECM filter with the Brita AromaCrema cartridge is also a WAC resin filter. The spec sheet that you can download from here clearly states that it is a decarbonizing filter.

Neither of these can be recharged and should be replaced before they are depleted (which depends on througput volume and water hardness). Brita advises that their filter should be replaced at 6 months even if not yet depleted. It would be prudent to do the same with the Bestcup. Both of these are combined with activated charcoal filtration.

If you know that your hose-end filter is a simple conventional sodium exchange, SAC resin softening filter, then perhaps you can recharge it with sodium or potassium chloride salts. Personally I would not do that unless the manufacturer provides instructions for doing so, and even then would be extra cautious about giving it an extra long rinse after recharge. (You want to flush out all that chloride -- it can be corrosive to your machine.) The DVA softener is one example of a rechargeable softener that has long been used with espresso equipment, but is a relatively bulky undersink unit and not a hose-end unit.
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

JRising

#4: Post by JRising »

Interesting, and thank you...
The recharging statement referred only to the ECM branded one, but I withdraw it for the time being...
I have memory notes written here "Lelit=2 weeks recharge, 6 months replace" and "ECM= 2 weeks recharge, 12 months replace", but until I can find where this information was gathered, I suggest trusting HomeBurrero, I may have gotten the info from a salesperson.

Davi-L

#5: Post by Davi-L »

Hello, Years ago I installed a water softener cartridge in the incoming water line. When I tasted the water coming out of it I had to spit. Salty.
So you may want to follow up what the resulting water really tastes like. I just re-installed the charcoal filter.
My house now has a water softener because the water is really hard.
I'm happy enough.

Dave

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homeburrero
Team HB

#6: Post by homeburrero »

Davi-L wrote:When I tasted the water coming out of it I had to spit. Salty.
When a conventional softener is new or after a recharge the water may taste salty, and if it does you probably have a lot of chloride in the water, which is not good for espresso machines. Always flush a new or recharged conventional softener. Some say to flush until it no longer tastes salty. You really want to flush quite a bit more than that. Even if you use a charcoal finishing filter after the softener it will not remove chloride. (Note: chloride is not the same thing as chlorine.)
Pat
nínádiishʼnahgo gohwééh náshdlį́į́h

emradguy
Supporter ❤

#7: Post by emradguy »

I don't think there's anyone on this entire board who knows as much about water as Pat (homeburrero). I would listen to him over anyone else, if you ever see contradicting statements.

Personally, I wouldn't waste my time or money with in-reservoir filters...btdt. I think you're better off finding a good bottled water with the correct mineral composition or mixing your own from distilled water and mineral salts. You won't have to remember to restock filters or when you last changed them. Just keep a jug of premixed water on hand and refill the reservoir as needed. You have to do that anyways!

There's a whole section on water in these forums, which will provide you will all of the science, etc, needed to take care of your machine. But the simplest solution is to add 0.4g potassium bicarbonate to 1 gallon distilled water. Weigh out the bicarb, drop it in the jug and shake it up...done! You can buy Pharmaceutical grade potassium bicarbonate through Amazon or Whole Foods. I picked up a 4oz packet for under $10. That's enough for roughly 280 gallons. You've probably already got a capable scale, but if not, pick one up that measures to .01g resolution and you'll be set...should cost you about $20.

a_k9 (original poster)

#8: Post by a_k9 (original poster) »

Very interesting. Thank you all for the information. I just finished reading that Insanely Long water FAQ by Jim Shulman.

I would consider distilled water approach, but am quite concerned about the impact on the environment -- the plastic that may or may not get properly recycled. [EDIT] Plan to checkout wholefood/Walmart nearby[CA] to see if they allow bring-your-own container option.

a_k9 (original poster)

#9: Post by a_k9 (original poster) » replying to a_k9 »

update:

Wholefoods near me do sell water by gallon.
  • RO: 49c/gallon
    Deionized (advertised as similar to Distilled): 49c/gallon
    Alkaline water with pH of 8.7: 99c/gallon
So, I guess I could take the route of purchasing Deionized water and add potassium bicarbonate(as suggested) to start my journey.

Thank you all.