"Turpresso"? Turkish coffee with an espresso machine. - Page 6

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vit

#51: Post by vit »

Yeah, resistance in coffee puck is quite complex subject, I don't remember that I've seen any mathematical model describing it ...

However, in my last case, coffee grounds were already extracted in csezve, they were not tamped, quantity was low, so there was almost no resistance. In case of higher quantity (which can't fit into small Flair basket) it might have been different

I tried filtering it first (2 or 3 days ago) through quite fine sieve, but most of the fines ended in the cup anyway. This way it was considerably more effective

In Turkey, they mostly drink tea and instant coffee. I think that Balkans and probably Greece is the area with highest percentage of turkish coffee drinkers ... but yeah, never throw the sediments into kitchen sink, otherwise it may eventually clog ...

Jonk

#52: Post by Jonk »

GDM528 wrote:I have a renewed level of sympathy for the dishwashers at Turkish coffee shops.
This is the main reason I'm not using the cezve all the time :oops: a simple rinse is not enough.
vit wrote:recipe used in Balkans where you actually put the coffee into just off the boil water and return it to the heat again until it starts foaming
Interesting. I tried this and the grounds wouldn't sediment nearly as good as usual. Definitely more body that way, but I prefer using warm water:
jpender wrote:I start with hot tap water, which is about 55°C.
I was always told not to use warm tap water though as it can leach more metal from pipes and fittings, not to mention from the water tank. Does your warm tap water taste like the cold after cooling down? I compared mine and there's only a slight off flavor - probably not detectable in brewed coffee I guess..

jpender

#53: Post by jpender »

Jonk wrote:I was always told not to use warm tap water though as it can leach more metal from pipes and fittings, not to mention from the water tank. Does your warm tap water taste like the cold after cooling down? I compared mine and there's only a slight off flavor - probably not detectable in brewed coffee I guess..
Yes, I am aware of this concern. I think it is a valid issue but suspect it to be a relatively minor risk in this instance (80g of water on the rare occasions I make Turkish coffee or do something similar).

Our hot tap water tastes just fine when cool. We have very soft water of high quality. I haven't purchased bottle water for drinking since moving here.

jpender

#54: Post by jpender »

vit wrote:Yeah, resistance in coffee puck is quite complex subject, I don't remember that I've seen any mathematical model describing it ...
Didn't the paper a few years ago that Christopher Hendon coauthored include modeling the puck?

Here it is: https://www.cell.com/matter/pdf/S2590-2 ... 0410-2.pdf

vit

#55: Post by vit » replying to jpender »

Thanks. I think that I've actually seen it and forgot in the meantime. However, it is mostly oriented into subject how to maximize ratio between yield and coffee used. As about coffee puck resistance/flow, as I can see, there are only a few sentences and one simple formula with general idea that flow is in direct proportion with pressure, which is a huge oversimplification of the real thing

jpender

#56: Post by jpender »


vit

#57: Post by vit »

One more low pressure espresso attempt

Medium roast 4.0g ground with Sözen at position 0.8 turns. This time preheated cylinder, piston and basket. Instead of constant flow, used constant pressure (actually constant force) profile this time - around 1.2 bar, lowering slightly at the end. Extracted 28.6 g into the cup, then put another cup and extracted 16g more, just to see what will happen with stream temperature. Due to higher flow, it was even higher.

Coffee in the first cup was nice, probably my best approximation of turkish coffee using espresso method so far. Will do one more attempt, making it slightly shorter
"Coffee" in the second cup looked like rooibos tea, it had some kind of generic unpleasant bitter taste


jpender

#58: Post by jpender »

I tried making Turkish coffee this morning with the beans I bought for making espresso. And the coffee was way better that way. I'm trying to figure this out. What is this telling me? What should I do differently with my espresso machine?

And don't tell me to make Turpresso. :-)

GDM528 (original poster)

#59: Post by GDM528 (original poster) »

jpender wrote:I tried making Turkish coffee this morning with the beans I bought for making espresso. And the coffee was way better that way. I'm trying to figure this out. What is this telling me? What should I do differently with my espresso machine?

And don't tell me to make Turpresso. :-)
Can you say more about the beans you used - light/medium/dark roast?

My first attempts at making <I dare not speak its name>, were with a medium/light roast that was terrible as espresso. I considered them 'scrap' beans, but the results were actually pretty good. Between the ultrafine grind and the long brew time, the extraction is much higher isn't it, so perhaps Turkish is a different 'take' on the beans.

jpender

#60: Post by jpender »

Medium roast.

I have one of those cheap optical refractomters. I measured the espresso and the extraction is surprisingly low, just 17%. The Turkish coffee was 26%! That's an enormous difference and certainly suggests I should try to increase the extraction of my espresso. I'm pulling just shy of 1:2 (16g in 30g out) but when I've increased the ratio it added bitter notes. So maybe a finer grind and a slower pull? Or maybe hotter?

That said, I don't feel like I've changed anything but now the espresso is tasting much better, as good as the Turkish. Just different. Looking at the syringes of the the coffees it's striking how cloudy the espresso is, even after sitting for a few hours, and how clear the Turkish coffee is.

They're just different.