Shipping an espresso machine - help - Page 3

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KnowGood

#21: Post by KnowGood »

Why this method isn't practiced is beyond me:

Foam-In-Bag
Lyndon
_________
LMWDP #251

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cafeIKE
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#22: Post by cafeIKE »

It is used. Disadvantage is 1 time failure. Once crushed, there is no protection.

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espressme

#23: Post by espressme »

Here is a link to Orphan espresso and their take on how to pack for shipment. I have had two machines trashed so far when shipped to me. none that I shipped.
http://www.orphanespresso.com/PACKING-Y ... 550-1.html
Good luck and pack to survive a 6foot drop with other stuff falling six feet onto the top of it.
Respectfully
~Richard
richard penney LMWDP #090,

Javier

#24: Post by Javier »

cafeIKE wrote:Only a neanderthal would expect a 70lb machine in a single wall 12lb box w 1in of peanuts to make to the end of the driveway..
This is exactly what recently happened to me. I bought a commercial lever machine through Craigslist, and paid via PayPal. The shipping company used by the seller (who is also the owner of a company) double-bagged a 75 pounds machine, and placed it on top of one inch (1") layer of Styrofoam peanuts inside a single box. The machine dimensions were almost the same as the inner dimensions of the box, and the box was rated for 65 pounds maximum weight. It was sent via FedEx, and arrived with several damages. After filing a claim with FedEx (it was bought with insurance), FedEx responded that the evidence (i.e., pictures, dimensions, weight, and other documentation) clearly shows the machine was not properly packed and protected. I informed the seller of FedEx's decision, and asked him for a full refund (I will then return the machine). Now he and the shipping company he used are playing the "it was not our fault" game. Since the receipt for the sale of the machine has the official logo of his company, I wonder if this is something Better Business Bureau (BBB) should take care of. Quite a nightmare.
LMWDP #115

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HB
Admin

#25: Post by HB »

Javier wrote:The shipping company used by the seller (who is also the owner of a company) double-bagged a 75 pounds machine...
It costs more, but strapping a heavy espresso machine to a mini pallet and shipping via a freight company is worth the peace of mind. That's how the machine below was shipped for the Buyer's Guide to the Elektra A3:

Image
Dan Kehn

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cannonfodder
Team HB

#26: Post by cannonfodder »

The best luck I have had with shipping is double boxing. The machine packed in the factory box with the factory padding and a few pillow packs to fill any air spaces, then a second box with pillow packs, packed in very tightly. You need to keep everything from moving. My A3 was shipped like the one in HB's photo. It was all strapped to a half pallet and then that strapped to a full pallet and shipped heavy freight.
Dave Stephens

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RapidCoffee
Team HB

#27: Post by RapidCoffee »

cannonfodder wrote:The best luck I have had with shipping is double boxing.
+1. IMHO this is the only safe way to ship a heavy espresso machine. (I am including pallets in the double box category.)
John

ptervin

#28: Post by ptervin »

Pallets are a very good idea. Your original box is also going to help a lot. I had two commercial machines (off eBay with no original packing) sent from the US to Japan earlier this year and both arrive fairly well intact. The weak points for both machines seemed to be the legs. The two separate shipments arrived with slightly bent legs (how many feet were they dropped?). Not a serious problem as they were easily rebent, but that seemed to be the worst problem. Then again, these commercial machines are built like tanks so that may make some difference. That being said, this is just my personal limited experience.

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espressme

#29: Post by espressme »

RapidCoffee wrote:+1. IMHO this is the only safe way to ship a heavy espresso machine. (I am including pallets in the double box category.)
I received a double boxed machine that was extremely well packed inside the inner box by the seller!! The UPS store would not allow the seller to help with the double boxing. So. since the inner box was heavy, the UPS store just flipped it over into the outer box.The inner box traveled across country upside down and did about $800 damage to the Conti.
Photo of the opening with the outer box "This side up" to the top.
In my opinion, pallets are the only way to ship a heavy machine.
Respectfully
~Richard
richard penney LMWDP #090,

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RapidCoffee
Team HB

#30: Post by RapidCoffee »

espressme wrote:In my opinion, pallets are the only way to ship a heavy machine.
For really heavy gear, I would agree. But pallets add quite a bit to the shipping cost. In my experience, you can ship espresso gear weighing under 100# safely if it is double boxed properly.

Of course, nothing is truly idiot proof, because idiots are so darn persistent...
John