Sanremo You - Single Group Espresso Machine - Page 3

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coffeechan (original poster)

#21: Post by coffeechan (original poster) »

Thanks all for the additional links and ojt for the in person photos. The San Remo You will be worth considering at the 5500 EUR price point. It'll clock above the E1 Prima, but rightly so because of the inclusion of flow profiling and electronics. The bright lights of the expo reveal a lot. They make the grouphead seem outsized and the drip tray pretty low and squat. The proportions aren't as attractive as the marketing, but still an impressive and gorgeous machine.

sidcam

#22: Post by sidcam »

BaristaBob wrote:Yes pump...does it use a rotary or vibe pump?
Been on the US and UK sites and did a word search on their brochure and the only reference to the pump anywhere says:

VOLUMETRIC PUMP
New generation of 70 liters which allows profiling.

Versalab: maker and supplier of finest espresso equipment
Sponsored by Versalab
sidcam

#23: Post by sidcam »

coffeechan wrote:Thanks all for the additional links and ojt for the in person photos. The San Remo You will be worth considering at the 5500 EUR price point. It'll clock above the E1 Prima, but rightly so because of the inclusion of flow profiling and electronics. The bright lights of the expo reveal a lot. They make the grouphead seem outsized and the drip tray pretty low and squat. The proportions aren't as attractive as the marketing, but still an impressive and gorgeous machine.
Yeah, the electronics are probably worth a premium based on what I've seen so far.

I don't trust any manufacturer to support app development for the potential lifespan these machines may have. I can say one of the reasons I haven't pulled the trigger on a Prima is I keep questioning if I really want to deal with the three button/blinking light UI should app development die sooner rather than later. I look at other machines with apps, like the GS3, and from what I can tell the app is nice to use but you can still do everything fairly intuitively, albeit slower, from the little LED panel on the machine.

And with that said, the Rocket R9One also has a little touch screen and I've seen a lot of negative things written about it. I think it was the German forum where they were doing a tear down on it and apparently that screen is a custom and potentially expensive part to replace.

It will be interesting to see what the insides looks like and what repair guys think of it.

JackHK

#24: Post by JackHK »

HB wrote:That's a small brew boiler, but larger than the La Marzocco Linea Mini's; the steam boiler is much smaller. Not sure what to make of the Sanremo's brochure saying "Instant freshly heated water for higher quality infusions." That sounds like a heat exchanger. The dimensions are fairly cabinet friendly (394mm = 15.5").

image
From brochure (PDF)

Jesus :( we are still in the stone age :|

1-liter, 1500-watt steam boiler and a 0.5-liter, 500-watt brew boiler.

PeetsFan
Supporter ♡

#25: Post by PeetsFan »

HB wrote:That's a small brew boiler, but larger than the La Marzocco Linea Mini's; the steam boiler is much smaller. Not sure what to make of the Sanremo's brochure saying "Instant freshly heated water for higher quality infusions." That sounds like a heat exchanger. The dimensions are fairly cabinet friendly (394mm = 15.5").

image
From brochure (PDF)
1.5 kW steam boiler and a 500 W brew boiler is 2 kilowatts. Divide that by 110V in the US, and that's over 18 Amps. You'll need a dedicated 20A circuit for this machine. You can't even put your grinder on the same circuit.

Granted, a lot of high end machines are like this.

I saw Sanremo's professional machines at the Expo in NOLA. Very impressive. For instance, their hot water dispenser works by steaming cold water, instead of dispensing hot water from the boiler. This prevents the boiler from quickly draining and subsequently shutting down for a reheat cycle. Very well thought out, through and through.

PeetsFan
Supporter ♡

#26: Post by PeetsFan »

sidcam wrote:Yeah, the electronics are probably worth a premium based on what I've seen so far.

I don't trust any manufacturer to support app development for the potential lifespan these machines may have. I can say one of the reasons I haven't pulled the trigger on a Prima is I keep questioning if I really want to deal with the three button/blinking light UI should app development die sooner rather than later. I look at other machines with apps, like the GS3, and from what I can tell the app is nice to use but you can still do everything fairly intuitively, albeit slower, from the little LED panel on the machine.

And with that said, the Rocket R9One also has a little touch screen and I've seen a lot of negative things written about it. I think it was the German forum where they were doing a tear down on it and apparently that screen is a custom and potentially expensive part to replace.

It will be interesting to see what the insides looks like and what repair guys think of it.
They aren't thinking it through with that screen. Proprietary or non-proprietary, it doesn't matter. In five years, whatever they're buying won't be on the market. So what they'll do is code up an FPGA to translate their interface into whatever the new screen uses. They mount the chip to the back of the panel and the result is a plug and play assembly. Not complex at all.

coffeechan (original poster)

#27: Post by coffeechan (original poster) »

PeetsFan wrote:1.5 kW steam boiler and a 500 W brew boiler is 2 kilowatts. Divide that by 110V in the US, and that's over 18 Amps. You'll need a dedicated 20A circuit for this machine. You can't even put your grinder on the same circuit.

Granted, a lot of high end machines are like this.

I saw Sanremo's professional machines at the Expo in NOLA. Very impressive. For instance, their hot water dispenser works by steaming cold water, instead of dispensing hot water from the boiler. This prevents the boiler from quickly draining and subsequently shutting down for a reheat cycle. Very well thought out, through and through.
The compromise for the US market will probably be cycling the boiler elements between steam and brew to fit onto a 15amp socket. It'll be interesting to see the internal design schematic to see if it's a saturated brew group or if the brew boiler is situated on top of the group. Either have been proven designs for excellent thermal stability and quick heatup.

Urnex: 100% dedicated focus on coffee and tea cleaning
Sponsored by Urnex
PeetsFan
Supporter ♡

#28: Post by PeetsFan » replying to coffeechan »

It's a terrible compromise. I just run at full power with my dual boiler, but you're right, most dual boilers let you choose between those two modes for 110V operation.

sidcam

#29: Post by sidcam »

PeetsFan wrote:They aren't thinking it through with that screen. Proprietary or non-proprietary, it doesn't matter. In five years, whatever they're buying won't be on the market. So what they'll do is code up an FPGA to translate their interface into whatever the new screen uses. They mount the chip to the back of the panel and the result is a plug and play assembly. Not complex at all.
Based on my life experiences, the complexity of making the new part is irrelevant. What matters is if the machine sold enough units, or for that matter is still being manufactured, to justify the expense of designing and manufacturing the new part.

A decade of strong sales and I have no doubt you'll still be able to get the most obscure GS3 parts for 20 years after it's finally discontinued. But some of these machines that had fumbled rollouts due to Covid are never going to hit their sales targets because of bad press and as such they're destined to be quietly replaced with something that doesn't look like them sooner rather than later. That means you've got about a decade before you need a donor machine for parts.

However Sanremo is no stranger to high tech machines, so I'd think if anyone has their ducks in a row it would be them (or Synesso).

PeetsFan
Supporter ♡

#30: Post by PeetsFan » replying to sidcam »

My comment was specific to LCD touchscreens. You have an LCD touch screen assembly that comes from a company in Asia. It has an interface connection. The espresso machine has an interface connection. So if the LCD is discontinued from the manufacturer, the espresso machine maker simply programs an FPGA and then the espresso machine's interface will work with a newer touch screen. It happens a lot, like with replaceable cell phone screens, etc.