Preparing Espresso Machine for Storage

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ginalola

#1: Post by ginalola »

I need to put my Pasquini Livia 90 Automatic into storage for several months. How do you prepare a machine for storage?

cyclones

#2: Post by cyclones »

I would thoroughly clean and backflush it first, then I would drain the boiler, and then any water lines should probably be drained as well. To take the lines apart you will need a flare wrench set.

Don't know if there's anything else, but I think backflushing and draining the boiler are absolute musts.
If given a choice between Starbucks and espresso, I'll choose espresso every time.

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HB
Admin

#3: Post by HB »

If the machine will be stored in a heated space for a few months, it can be as simple as turning it off and then descaling/flushing when you bring it out of storage. The FAQ elaborates in Preparing an espresso machine for storage, Draining an HX boiler for storage and shipping, and Advice about bringing an espresso machine out of storage.
Dan Kehn

godlyone

#4: Post by godlyone »

Draining the boiler for sure, but I would also try to get the water out of the HX tube - either by using compressed air and blowing it out or turning machine upside down.

I would also leave the tube to the HX unscrewed

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stefano65
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#5: Post by stefano65 »

also from all the above good suggestion
make sure that the water line going to the vibe pump is clear from water
if not as it dries it will stick the mechanism of the pump and upon re-using it most likely will not suck in
a way to do that is to ( considering your particular model of machine) will be to access the inlet of the pump and blow some compressed air out from the by-pass line or remove the output and blow it right through
Stefano Cremonesi
Stefano's Espresso Care
Repairs & sales from Oregon.

ginalola

#6: Post by ginalola »

I appreciate all the suggestions. The reservoir is empty, but I did not drain the lines/boiler. I may be using it in a couple of weeks; if not, then I will need to take more drastic measures.

What is the effect of a humid environment...like in a New England lake house during the summer months...on this machine? It will be going in and out of air-conditioning.

cyclones

#7: Post by cyclones »

I would think it shouldn't be a problem. These machines are designed to operate in humid conditions. They create steam after all.
If given a choice between Starbucks and espresso, I'll choose espresso every time.

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Psyd

#8: Post by Psyd »

cyclones wrote:These machines are designed to operate in humid conditions. They create steam after all.
When they create steam, they're operating at an ambient temperature of well over a hundred degrees, too, so in effect becoming their very own de-humidifier. Something tells me that they're going to react remarkably different as the water in that boiler start to approach the physical state at the other end of the temperature scale.
Espresso Sniper
One Shot, One Kill

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Randy G.

#9: Post by Randy G. »

ginalola wrote:.... I may be using it in a couple of weeks; if not, then I will need to take more drastic measures.... What is the effect of a humid environment...like in a New England lake house during the summer months...on this machine? It will be going in and out of air-conditioning.
It should be fine. A couple of weeks storage, even if water is left in the lines, shouldn't be a problem at all, IF:
1 - Fresh water is run through the machine after it is allowed to heat up before being put back into use.
2 - If it is not being stored where it will subjected to freezing temperatures.
For extended storage in humid climates, precautions should be taken to keep out pests and vermin.
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