Plumbing my European Rocket Cinquantotto to a US 1/4" compression ice maker valve

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pmansour112
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#1: Post by pmansour112 »

I recently renovated my kitchen and had the plumber install a new water line for my Rocket Cinquantotto espresso machine. The plumber installed a 1/4" compression valve (aka an ice maker valve) on the counter where I have my espresso machine. However, I've been stuck trying to figure out how / where to get the right fittings and hoses to connect the espresso machine to the valve.

I bought my machine from https://espressocoffeeshop.com which shipped it from Europe, so it's not made for the US market. It came with a supply hose, which (I think) is 1/8" BSP thread on both sides, but I'm not 100% sure.

What's the easiest way to connect the machine to my water line? And where can I find the necessary parts?

Bonus question: if I wanted to connect the machine to a water filter system (e.g. BWT BestMax), would I need any different or special parts? IIUC, the BWT BestMax also uses BSP threads and should be able to connect directly to the Rocket with the supplied parts.

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#2: Post by Pressino »

I'm not certain, but I think it's more likely the feedline for your European market machine has 3/8" BSP rather than 1/4" BSP threads. You might consider getting the following 3/8" BSP to 3/8"NPT adapter hose, or one like it from another source:

https://www.voltagerestaurantsupply.com ... t-bwt55553

If for some reason your plumber installed a 1/4" threaded stop valve instead of the more common (for undersink use) 3/8" valve, you could either ask him to change it or you could purchase a 3/8" to 1/4" reducer from a place like Home Depot.

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#3: Post by JRising »

In North America, Rockets come with a 1/8 BSP inlet. They come with a 1/8 and 1/8 BSP braided hose, so the conversions you would have to make are 3/8 BSP to 1/8 BSP at the outlet of your BWT set-up:

https://www.espressoplanet.com/V..307-3 ... tting.html

and a some sort of conversion hose to go from your NPT shut-off valve to the 3/8 BSP inlet of the first component of your BWT set-up:

Note: NOT THIS ONE. This is for a typical 3/8 Compression conversion to 3/8 BSP. You'd have to find something similar if you really have a 1/4 NPT shut-off valve.

https://www.espressoplanet.com/Braided- ... ssion.html

Distributors in your state will have the exact same as well as similar products.
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stefano65
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#4: Post by stefano65 »

In addition to the well suggested ones,
here is also a fitting that coming from Italy you can find it from EU suppliers as well
https://beta.espressocare.com/products/ ... ession-npt
there is also a less common
flare version
or if you go John Guest there are several different options example this to start under the sink splitting a line
https://beta.espressocare.com/products/ ... line-valve

all the linked above are coming from EU therefor you should be able to find them without the need of shipping from US.
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CarefreeBuzzBuzz
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#5: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

What water are you plumbing into this machine and are you convinced it's healthy for your machine?
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#6: Post by JRising »

pmansour112 wrote: Bonus question: if I wanted to connect the machine to a water filter system (e.g. BWT BestMax), would I need any different or special parts? IIUC, the BWT BestMax also uses BSP threads and should be able to connect directly to the Rocket with the supplied parts.
Bonus answer The fittings mentioned above are still the suggested fittings (Braided conversion hose to the BWT and the 3/8 NPT to 3/8 compression on the outlet of the BWT to match your machine's hose)...
But if you're on city water get a test strip to test for hardness as well as chlorides and chloramines. If the chloramine level is noticeable, you'll want a sodium exchange softener (so yes to Best Protect) rather than a hydrogen exchange softener (so no to Best Max). I'm no chemist so I'll explain it as easily as I need it, "Hydrogen and Chlorine makes hydrochloric acid. Acidic water rusts your steel valve parts, your stainless boilers, and galvanically deteriorates and bonds your fittings to the tubes and boilers".


(Now a chemist can jump in, or you can read further):
Warning: Chloride & sulfate levels with weak acid cation softeners (e.g., Everpure Claris)

pmansour112 (original poster)
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#7: Post by pmansour112 (original poster) »

Thanks for all the helpful answers so far!
What water are you plumbing into this machine and are you convinced it's healthy for your machine?
But if you're on city water get a test strip to test for hardness as well as chlorides and chloramines. If the chloramine level is noticeable, you'll want a sodium exchange softener (so yes to Best Protect) rather than a hydrogen exchange softener (so no to Best Max). I'm no chemist so I'll explain it as easily as I need it, "Hydrogen and Chlorine makes hydrochloric acid. Acidic water rusts your steel valve parts, your stainless boilers, and galvanically deteriorates and bods your fittings to the tubes and boilers".
I'm on city water in WA state, USA. Our water quality seems pretty good -- I got some test strips from Amazon (https://a.co/d/0pWSpt3) which consistently showed relatively soft water (CaCo3 reading was between 0-25 ppm). Here is our utility's yearly water quality report, which I think shows soft water too: http://yourwater.awwd.com/. However, I don't see a reading for Chloramine anywhere -- not sure if it's listed there under a different name though.
In North America, Rockets come with a 1/8 BSP inlet. They come with a 1/8 and 1/8 BSP braided hose, so the conversions you would have to make are 3/8 BSP to 1/8 BSP at the outlet of your BWT set-up:

https://www.espressoplanet.com/V..307-3 ... tting.html

and a some sort of conversion hose to go from your NPT shut-off valve to the 3/8 BSP inlet of the first component of your BWT set-up:

Note: NOT THIS ONE. This is for a typical 3/8 Compression conversion to 3/8 BSP. You'd have to find something similar if you really have a 1/4 NPT shut-off valve.

https://www.espressoplanet.com/Braided- ... ssion.html

Distributors in your state will have the exact same as well as similar products.
Got it. So if I understand correctly, I'd need the following:

- BWT machine and stock parts (all 3/8" BSP).
- 3/8 BSP to 1/8 BSP conversion adapter for hose from BWT to Rocket.
- Some way to convert 1/4" NPT compression (for water shutoff) to 3/8" BSP (for BWT).

It's the last part that's been throwing me off. Perhaps if I can find a combination of 1/4" compression to 3/8" compression + that braided hose you linked?

Another alternative is to just ditch the ice box water line that the plumber added, and split the under-sink 3/8" water line to avoid that extra conversion. While it would suck to have a useless ice box valve, it may actually make more sense to use the under sink one, since I already have a hose running from there for drainage and I'd need somewhere to hide the BWT filter anyway.

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#8: Post by CarefreeBuzzBuzz »

There's no chloride reading. You need that before plumbing in. Maybe @homebuerro will chime in as he likely knows. You can't filter out Chloride.

Chloramine doesn't matter like Chloride.
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homeburrero
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#9: Post by homeburrero »

John makes an important point about that US Rocket hose being a 1/8" Female BSP at both ends. That will not screw into the 3/8" Male BSP on the BWT filter head without a 3/8" F x 1/8" M BSP adaptor like the one he linked in his post. Then if you buy a BWT with the BSP fittings you will want an adapter hose for the other end that is 3/8" F BSP at the end that attaches to the filter and 3/8" F compression for the end that you'll connect to your US plumbing. Whomever sells you the BWT filter will probably have that hose as well as the adapter for the Rocket hose. Then on the sink side if you need to go down to 1/4" compression icemaker hose I think you may need another adapter there.


As to whether a bestmax is a good choice depends on a lot of factors. If your water is actually 0-25 ppm soft, you certainly don't need softening, and so you don't want a Bestmax or a Bestprotect. If you wanted a BWT filter for soft water you'd just use something like a Besttaste for chlorine, off tastes and odors, and particulates. Any good activated charcoal or carbon block filter would do a reasonable job there. If your water utility uses chloramine rather than chlorine disinfectant, then you might consider a bigger charcoal or carbon filter, or pay a little extra for one that is optimized for chloramine removal (often called a catalytic carbon filter.) It's primarily a taste issue and some people find chloramine more objectionable than others. If you have high chloride ion (say up in the 15 - 50 ppm range) then you're looking at a corrosion risk issue and the recommended solution for that would be a reverse osmosis system. (Chloride in Water - Recommended Acceptable Ranges) To know if you have high chloride (which is different than chlorine in a water report) you may need to contact your water utility and ask.
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homeburrero
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#10: Post by homeburrero »

In my last post I neglected to see that you did provide a link to your water utility report. Clearly your water is very soft and you certainly would not want a Bestmax nor a Bestprotect with this water. It appears that they use chlorine and not chloramine, and any good carbon or charcoal filter will handle that.

As CarefreeBuzzBuzz said, they don't provide a chloride number which is often the case with these consumer confidence reports. But given the low sodium and other numbers I think you can safely assume that you have no chloride issue with your water.

Any simple NSF 42 'aesthetic' filter that removes chlorine, off tastes and odors, and particles will do the job here. Most of them last 6 months between cartridge replacements.
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