Pictures of how you plumbed in your espresso machine that is against a wall

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chrisrose98

#1: Post by chrisrose98 »

Hi All,

Wondering if anyone has pictures of how they ran their water lines to their machines? I have a granite counter and it would be against the outside wall coming from the sink next to where it would be. I have heard that some of you have run it through a small cut out in the drywall which would be better than drilling the counter (wife says that won't happen) so I am looking for pictures of how to make it look professional. I have access through the cabinet under where the machine will go but I am trying to visualize how the hose will come out of the wall and not have it look like I knocked a hole in the wall with a hammer.

My initial thought is to run the water supply through the sink cabinet wall to under the machine, make as small a hole in the upper back of the cabinet and then a corresponding hole right above the granite counter but I don't know how to secure it and make it not look amateur Thanks for any shares or ideas on how you did it.

ng

#2: Post by ng »

Do you have a photo?

lagoon

#3: Post by lagoon »

You can use a brush wallplate to make it look tidy and professional.

Are you planning to plumb out the drain line as well? This might be difficult with a wall route, as it may be uphill.

Personally I wouldn't plumb in if you're not also plumbing out.

Prodigy

#4: Post by Prodigy » replying to lagoon »

I have to respectfully disagree about that. I only have my machine plumbed in for water, and not out with the drain. It is actually more beneficial because there's no chance of clogging a drain line, no bad smells coming back up, and if the drain mains ever back up, it won't come out on your kitchen counter. It only fills up once or twice a week, and is as super easy to empty...

Just my opinion, I would say water is way more important, and not being able to drain would not stop me from doing water.

ng

#5: Post by ng » replying to Prodigy »

Yeah, agree. I have water, but no drain. My machine drips into a larger drip tray and evaporates. I don't have to empty it unless I'm doing a bunch of pulls.

lagoon

#6: Post by lagoon »

Prodigy wrote:I have to respectfully disagree about that. I only have my machine plumbed in for water, and not out with the drain. It is actually more beneficial because there's no chance of clogging a drain line, no bad smells coming back up, and if the drain mains ever back up, it won't come out on your kitchen counter.
These aren't issues if the drain line is connected correctly. The normal process is to connect it to a spigot, upstream of the S-bend.This means that odours cannot get up the line. If your drains block up, the water will emerge at the lowest point (your sinkhole) and not "uphill" to the bench top.
It only fills up once or twice a week, and is as super easy to empty...

Just my opinion, I would say water is way more important, and not being able to drain would not stop me from doing water.
Yeah, I agree that it's easy to empty a drip tray and that plumbing in is more beneficial than out from a standpoint of convenience and features.

I was coming at it from the angle of a water leak risk.

When you plumb in a machine, you are introducing an essentially infinite water supply. If a plumbed machine develops a leak at the group while you are out of the house, this will quickly overwhelm the capacity of a sealed drip tray and then you're looking at a household flooding incident.

Of course not all leaks are at the group, but it's one scenario that can be easily mitigated by plumbing out.

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slybarman

#7: Post by slybarman »

Or if your accidentally leave the brew lever up or part way up and have the machine on a timer.

Prodigy

#8: Post by Prodigy »

lagoon wrote:These aren't issues if the drain line is connected correctly. The normal process is to connect it to a spigot, upstream of the S-bend.This means that odours cannot get up the line. If your drains block up, the water will emerge at the lowest point (your sinkhole) and not "uphill" to the bench top.



Yeah, I agree that it's easy to empty a drip tray and that plumbing in is more beneficial than out from a standpoint of convenience and features.

I was coming at it from the angle of a water leak risk.

When you plumb in a machine, you are introducing an essentially infinite water supply. If a plumbed machine develops a leak at the group while you are out of the house, this will quickly overwhelm the capacity of a sealed drip tray and then you're looking at a household flooding incident.

Of course not all leaks are at the group, but it's one scenario that can be easily mitigated by plumbing out.
I can see where you're coming from there. However, that would be like worrying about your refrigerator, under sink plumbing, water heater etc, all the time. Any of them could fail at any time(I had a water heater split down the seam in my attic, thankfully it was a rental and my wife was home when it happened!)

I think this is a situation that could have valid points on both sides, practically indefinitely. Risk vs reward, i believe favors plumbing it in.

Plumb it in, lots of people do. Do it right. Check it often if you're that worried. Turn the supply off when you go on vacation. Don't leave the handle in an on position when its off... I'll never go back to a reservoir.

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HB
Admin

#9: Post by HB »

Prodigy wrote:However, that would be like worrying about your refrigerator, under sink plumbing, water heater etc, all the time.
Not to mention washing machines; mine overflowed last year. Fortunately, we caught it right away. I don't want to think about the damage if we had started a load and left for lunch. :shock:

Flood Mitigation for Plumbed Espresso Machines is a helpful reference from the FAQ. And it's worth checking with your local plumbing code. IIRC, in my city, an espresso machine that's directly plumbed in must have a drain and backflow preventer.

On a related note, once I was talking with my insurance agent about some DIY projects. He pointed out that if there was a loss and it was attributed to an error in my (uninspected) work, the insurance company could deny the claim. That's why I always pull permits when required to get the town inspector's signoff. The same goes for contractor work, i.e., I insist they pull required permits and they don't get paid until it passes inspection (some will offer a "discount" if you skip this step :roll:)
Dan Kehn

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slybarman

#10: Post by slybarman »

Starting the dishwasher and leaving on vacation is a big no-no that had flooded many houses as well.