Pasquini Livia 90 Solenoid Valve Replacement

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jhford

#1: Post by jhford » Oct 08, 2019, 11:01 am

Sorry to start a new topic; the others were too old. I just replaced my 3-way with Pasquini's current part and it works, but the drip tray is about 1/3 full after pulling one shot. Is that too full?
Thanks

jhford

#2: Post by jhford » Oct 08, 2019, 12:21 pm

jhford wrote:Sorry to start a new topic; the others were too old. I just replaced my 3-way solenoid valve with Pasquini's current part and it works, but the drip tray is about 1/3 full after pulling one shot. Is that too full?
Thanks

User avatar
hankbates

#3: Post by hankbates » Oct 10, 2019, 9:38 am

The drip tray on the Livia 90 is smaller than many users would like; in fact, at one time Pasquini came out with a stainless tray with about twice the capacity of the standard plastic one, but apparently its cost led to so few sales that it was quickly discontinued.
With the standard setup, all the "recycled" water coming from the OPV is routed to the drain, so if you have a very fine grind, with very low flow through the puck, your drip tray will fill quickly.
A good way around this would be to route this water back to the reservoir by removing the tee at the drain spout, and moving the rubber hose.

Of course, a solenoid which doesn't seal off its drain port could be your issue. Just because it is new doesn't mean that it isn't jammed from the manufacturer.

You can check to see where the problem lies by taking off the cover and sides, putting the reservoir in its socket and reconnecting its ground wire, removing the rubber hose from the tee, and seeing where the water comes out when you initiate a backflush. If the solenoid is good, all the flow will come from the OPV.

jhford

#4: Post by jhford » Oct 11, 2019, 1:26 am

Can you explain this a little better.
"You can check to see where the problem lies by taking off the cover and sides, putting the reservoir in its socket and reconnecting its ground wire, removing the rubber hose from the tee, and seeing where the water comes out when you initiate a backflush. If the solenoid is good, all the flow will come from the OPV."
Thanks

User avatar
hankbates

#5: Post by hankbates » Oct 11, 2019, 9:49 am

You will be running the machine with the top and sides removed, so you can see what is happening. This requires reconnecting and filling the reservoir with the covers removed.
If you then disconnect the rubber hose which goes from the over pressure valve to the tee next to the drain; then put the backflush disc in your portafilter and briefly instruct the machine to brew. No water should be coming to or from the drain, if the solenoid is ok, with water only coming out of the unconnected rubber hose.

jhford

#6: Post by jhford » Oct 11, 2019, 9:51 am

jhford wrote:Can you explain this a little better.
"You can check to see where the problem lies by taking off the cover and sides, putting the reservoir in its socket and reconnecting its ground wire, removing the rubber hose from the tee, and seeing where the water comes out when you initiate a backflush. If the solenoid is good, all the flow will come from the OPV."
Thanks
Ok. I understand. I'll try it today.
Thanks

jhford

#7: Post by jhford » Oct 12, 2019, 4:01 pm

I did what you suggested, I think. What I'm not sure of is that I disconnected the plastic tune from the connector at the bottom of the OPV. The back flush water squirted out of the same connector. Comments?

User avatar
hankbates

#8: Post by hankbates » Oct 13, 2019, 10:58 am

The OPV is part of a cluster of fittings located at the left rear of the machine beneath and a little forward of the reservoir support. When you initiate the backflush by activating brewing with the PF/backflush solid disc in place, the pressure within it should rise so that the following will happen, in this order:

1. Pressure in the line leading to the 2way boiler fill solenoid will be blocked by a closed (non-actuated) 2way solenoid.
2. The pressure in the OPV will rise enough to unseat the spring loaded check valve in the line leading to the heat exchanger capsule and from there to the actuated 3way solenoid, and to the blocked portafilter in the group head. The solenoid port leading to the drain should be closed and allow no flow.
3. If both of the above are working as designed, then the more robust spring loaded check valve in the line with the rubber hose to drain will open and allow flow. This flow should be quite small, as at the pressure (125+psi) needed to open this valve the pump flow rate is greatly reduced as required by its performance curve.
There should be flow only through the long rubber hose until you turn off the brew switch or the brew cycle (touchpad units) completes.

Nomenclature is a bit of a problem when trying to discuss these issues.
The livia 90 parts diagrams now posted on this site should be helpful:

/downloads/ ... -Parts.pdf

jhford

#9: Post by jhford » Oct 13, 2019, 7:22 pm

Ok.I hope I got this right because I hate being a pest. I did what you said and put the dangling end of the plastic tube, which normally connects the OPV to the solenoid valve, in a plastic container to catch the water. I had idea how much water would flow. I did a backflush. A small amount of water dropped into the container and the drip tray is about half full. Good or bad? See pics.
jhford wrote:I did what you suggested, I think. What I'm not sure of is that I disconnected the plastic tune from the connector at the bottom of the OPV. The back flush water squirted out of the same connector. Comments?

jhford

#10: Post by jhford » Oct 13, 2019, 7:26 pm

I forgot. 2 backflushes produced about 1/8 cup water in the plastic collector.