Looking for R91 OWNER reliability feedback

Need help with equipment usage or want to share your latest discovery?
mx125
Posts: 11
Joined: 6 years ago

#1: Post by mx125 »

Hello. Looking at saturated head with profiling ability and really like the theoretical R91 features. The La Mazarcco GS3 MP users are everywhere and very VERY supportive. But I don't like the old school manual only approach and the little things like the leak off of water, sticky paddle, no saved profile etc. Unfortunately, seems there are not many that own the R91. The initial or anecdotal feedback is iffy or negative. But may be heresay.. iDrink coffee in Canada pulled out of Rocket due to quality and support issues post sale of Rocket...Chris Coffee pulled out of R91...and only official dealer in Canada is Faema and I did not get any confidence from my discussion on either their knowledge or service. One seller loved the machine personally but tells me he expect the gear driven pump will need rebuild at some point in near future.
So....if I buy I'm kind of on my own. Hence really hoping to hear from some real users owners. Thanks !

lagoon
Posts: 503
Joined: 14 years ago

#2: Post by lagoon »

Ours has been running for 4 years straight without missing a beat. No servicing required so far other than a fresh silicon group gasket.


Comes on at 530am every day and remains on until 4pm

Pulls about 40 shots a week.

These units are quite popular at the high end here in Aus. They are built on Rocket's commercial lines using components from their multi group machines.

NelisB
Posts: 968
Joined: 14 years ago

#3: Post by NelisB »

Thanks for your reply. How is it tastewise? Can you elaborate?

lagoon
Posts: 503
Joined: 14 years ago

#4: Post by lagoon replying to NelisB »

Taste wise you can achieve whatever you like.

The group is fully saturated so you have extremely precise and consistent water temperature at the coalface.

The dispersion is excellent and the ability to profile means you can perform a bunch of different brew methods such as a long low preinfusion.

Very versatile unit.

mx125 (original poster)
Posts: 11
Joined: 6 years ago

#5: Post by mx125 (original poster) »

Thanks for that. Couldn't be a stronger endorsement in your experience. You mentioned it is popular in Aus. Same among your circle of owners ?

NelisB
Posts: 968
Joined: 14 years ago

#6: Post by NelisB »

Do you use the star-function ofter? (Paddle extraction saved to memory to reproduce that profile).

User avatar
BaristaBoy E61
Posts: 3455
Joined: 9 years ago

#7: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

More than a few times I've seen people fall in love with graphic colour digital displays and touch screens only to find out that in reality what's being delivered is falling short of the promise out of the marketing department of the espresso manufacturer. What follows are posts asking when the next firmware or software updates are expected that will correct these unforeseen 'events' (flaws).

Espresso machines, even those made by large, well known manufacturers, are unlike TV manufactures such as Sony, Samsung or LG. Espresso machines are all small run productions with proprietary electronics, displays and touch screens. Should they require replacement within 10-years are you assured that parts will be available? Have you ever tried replacing an inverter compressor for a 5-year old LG fridge that are made in the tens of thousands that are 'no longer available' or stocked? Would you like to be told that in not so many words that the espresso manufacture no longer has a 'relationship' with the manufacturer of the electronics; that you essentially are, 'on your own'?

With the exception of the Decent espresso machine, I worry about the replacement availability of electronics in high-end machines that are overly dependant on custom designs, with microprocessors and an abundance of sensors and elements to achieve not only temperature stability from boiler to basket but flow and or pressure profiling as well as functional Touch colour displays.

While I'm thinking about the purchase of a machine, I'm also thinking about the other end of the deal. How am I going to get out of this deal? Who am I going to sell this to? Who is going to want to buy it? If I won't be able to repair it, if it won't be functional when I might want to sell it, what do I have, a door stop or a boat anchor?

Unlike the classic 50 or 60-year old lever machines that can be rebuilt and lovingly restored back to full functionality, these electronic wonders might more resemble the usefulness and utility of a 10-year old cell phone because of the electronics.

Remember, that the 2-happiest days in the life of a boat owner are the day they bought it - and the day they sold it!

Caveat Emptor

YMMV
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

lagoon
Posts: 503
Joined: 14 years ago

#8: Post by lagoon »

BaristaBoy E61 wrote:More than a
Espresso machines, even those made by large, well known manufacturers, are unlike TV manufactures such as Sony, Samsung or LG. Espresso machines are all small run productions with proprietary electronics, displays and touch screens.
Just a fact check here. The screen in this case is from standard component maker Gicar

They supply off the shelf components used by nearly all makers of coffee machines. Similar to how Bosch supplies vehicle components used widely across car brands.

, I worry about the replacement ava
You worry too much!

jmvdigital
Posts: 24
Joined: 17 years ago

#9: Post by jmvdigital »

BaristaBoy E61 wrote:Unlike the classic 50 or 60-year old lever machines that can be rebuilt and lovingly restored back to full functionality, these electronic wonders might more resemble the usefulness and utility of a 10-year old cell phone because of the electronics.
No relation specifically to the R91, but I 100% agree with you. It's the main reason I went with an E61 machine with manual flow control. At least those are metal parts that I can see, touch, repair, and replace.

nikkon
Posts: 11
Joined: 9 years ago

#10: Post by nikkon »

Hi all,

I have the r91 for about 1 year. I upgraded from a dallacorte studio to this. both saturated groups, extremely stable.
At first, it has been a nightmare to learn how to set the profiles. simply too many variables.
After 3 months I manage to tailor 2 profiles that work nice for me but I still use the manual mode.
I would say the biggest pro for this machine is : repeatability. once the profile is set you can replicate it a million times.
I was scared at the beginning that being so large the boiler will take too long to heat up. It only takes 13m to get to 92C which is good enough for me.
Biggest minus: it consumes a lot of power.