Light scratch on espresso machine - Page 2

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sebastijan (original poster)

#11: Post by sebastijan (original poster) »

BaristaBoy E61 wrote:I'm not so sure that it's permanently damaged, it might be glue residue. I would try cleaning it off with the 'scratchy' side of a dish sponge.
I did exactly that and this is the result.

Ken5
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#12: Post by Ken5 »

Honestly... Of course I don't know, but thinking about it I find it hard to believe that a dish towel could do that, unless there is something really hard stuck to the towel and you pressed really hard. Looking at the closeness of the scratches sand or metal filings come to mind. Can you feel a grittiness on the towel? Do you have anything that you don't care about that you think you can scratch with the same towel?

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espressotime

#13: Post by espressotime »

spopinski wrote:Mother's metal polish with a rag cloth.
Better be careful.That layer if chrome is very thin.

malling

#14: Post by malling »

Ken5 wrote:Honestly... Of course I don't know, but thinking about it I find it hard to believe that a dish towel could do that, unless there is something really hard stuck to the towel and you pressed really hard. Looking at the closeness of the scratches sand or metal filings come to mind. Can you feel a grittiness on the towel? Do you have anything that you don't care about that you think you can scratch with the same towel?
Anything other the microfibre cloths or lens cloths should not be used on the machine as these are to abrasive. This is especially true of the chrome part that is soft and fragile, when I owned one it specifically said not to clean it with other then damp none abrasive microfibre cloths in the manual.

If you then need other you need to buy cleaning and polishing solution specifically made for those material and finish but should always be used with care and not frequently.

Towels are tiny bit abrasive and if you used them more then one time there will be particles inside the fabric. Even microfibre cloths pick up particles this is why you should not use them more then one time cleaning your camera lenses as you risk scratching the glass and coating, although that's far more fragile then this it's just to point it out.

JohnPK

#15: Post by JohnPK »

espressotime wrote:Better be careful.That layer if chrome is very thin.
If the OP has decided that they can't live with the scratches, and replacement is the next step if they can't be removed then there's really no downside to trying some metal polish. First, I'd try something like Goo Gone to make sure it's not glue residue. If you can feel the scratches with your fingernail, then they're definitely scratches and not glue residue. VERY light polishing with a clean microfiber cloth and some chrome polish (can find it in any auto parts store) may get rid of them or at least make them less noticeable to the point you can live with them.

romlee
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#16: Post by romlee »

I would add that nearly all automotive and silverware polishes have relatively coarse abrasives in them as the primary polishing agent. The use of these products will sometimes result in a "polished" surface that appears shiny but upon closer inspection are composed of minute "micro" scratches. It will be a hazy (crazed) shine as opposed to a mirror finish.

Be careful and use these products sparingly. Practice or test first on a surface similar to the group head. Be satisfied that the "cure" doesn't result in something far worse.

Mirror finishes on chrome, gemstones, or other solid materials will sometimes require micro abrasives such as diamond paste compounds. These pastes are much finer and the application and polishing process can vary to a great degree.

I've "restored" to near-mirror appearance with diamond pastes but never completely. At best I've been able to partially blend in the scratches with the surrounding unscratched areas to the point where I don't notice it as much. Faint praise, in deed.

I have read that large pieces such as a group head benefit from being dismounted and taken to a workshop specializing in restoring bright work such as this. These workshops have buffing wheels and polishing compounds mere mortals can't easily access.
“Be curious, not judgemental.” T. Lasso

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BaristaBoy E61

#17: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

Our E61 group has a few dings from the portafilter ears banging into it. It has been cleaned with all kinds of cloths, microfibre cloths, dish towels, sponges (both sides), paper towels and who knows what else - the group does not get scratched even after over 8-years.

Sounds like a poor chrome-plating job.
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

sebastijan (original poster)

#18: Post by sebastijan (original poster) »

Thanks guys. I will leave this to professionals.

I am currently waiting for a response from the distributor and Rocket to provide me a quote for a new part and engineer to replace it.

jfdana

#19: Post by jfdana »

FWIW, and for future reference, naphtha removes glue residue harmlessly, even from price stickers on good books and shellac finish, both of which are relatively fragile.

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BaristaBoy E61

#20: Post by BaristaBoy E61 replying to jfdana »

...Or 'it' lighterfluid.
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"