Is this trick to fill boilers legit?

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Elliot
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#1: Post by Elliot » Oct 05, 2019, 7:45 pm

Hey all,

So, I was talking to someone about getting around machines that require plumbing. I don't want to do the water jug thing either. What he said:

"No they don't need to be plumbed. I swap my machines at home all the time. When the machine is switched off and cooled down, it creates a vacuum inside the boiler of the machine. So once the temperature gauge has gone to zero, if you place a jug of water under the steamer wand and open it up it will draw the water into the boiler"

This seems overwhelmingly easy for using plumb-in machines like tank machines.

Anyone ever heard of this?

Thanks!

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stuartmac

#2: Post by stuartmac » Oct 05, 2019, 9:06 pm

No, 90% of new machines have a vacuum breaker so that the boiler won't go into a vacuum. Also if if that worked you could only steam, you still need brew water from somewhere.

Elliot
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#3: Post by Elliot » replying to stuartmac » Oct 05, 2019, 9:15 pm

Thanks, I should have mentioned that this relates to older machines. We were speaking of machines from the '60s predominantly.

vit

#4: Post by vit » Oct 06, 2019, 3:06 am

Elliot wrote: "No they don't need to be plumbed. I swap my machines at home all the time. When the machine is switched off and cooled down, it creates a vacuum inside the boiler of the machine. So once the temperature gauge has gone to zero, if you place a jug of water under the steamer wand and open it up it will draw the water into the boiler"

This seems overwhelmingly easy for using plumb-in machines like tank machines.

Anyone ever heard of this?
I'm using that to top up my Bellman stovetop steamer when needed, so I don't have to open it. Works perfect