How to clean an E61 dispersion screen

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Kristi

#1: Post by Kristi »

On Silvia, it was easy - unscrew the screw and the screen and dispersion plate drops into your hand.

How do I remove the E61 (QM Eliane) screen? Is it possible to remove it without also removing the gasket? Does removing the gasket necessarily destroy the gasket? How often should the topside of the screen be cleaned? I used to get lots of junk out of there on my Silvia.

I've read all the links I can find. I have a non-ridged screen.

tia!
Kristi (QM Eliane, 2 Mazzer Majors)
Kris

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Compass Coffee
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#2: Post by Compass Coffee »

Gasket holds screen in. Here's the procedure Click Here
Mike McGinness, Head Bean (Owner/Roast Master)
http://www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com

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Kristi

#3: Post by Kristi »

Compass Coffee wrote:Gasket holds screen in. Here's procedure Click Here
Yeah I had read that one - I guess I can't remove the gasket other than when I am going to replace it? So I guess it doesn't get dirty in there?
tia
Kristi
Kris

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HB
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#4: Post by HB »

Kristi wrote:So I guess it doesn't get dirty in there?
If you are doing water backflushes after each session and weekly espresso cleaner backflushes, you'll be disappointed how squeaky clean it is behind an E61's dispersion screen (yes, curiosity drives me to pop out the screen every couple months). Many home baristas simply replace the screen and gasket as a set when it no longer seals well and don't worry about destroying the gasket in the process by sticking it with an awl.

While this setup may seem like a pain, the advantage is there's nowhere behind the screen for grinds to hang up (no screws), so it's pretty easy to keep clean without disassembly. In the end, there's no practical reason to remove the screen before the gasket is shot as long as you keep the machine regularly maintained.

Image
This is after a few weeks (shame on me! :oops:)

If you look carefully, you can see the dispersion screen groove in the picture below. The "ungroovy" ones (left) usually have a thin metal ring spot-welded around the perimeter of the screen and a "dot" welded to the center, whose purpose is still a mystery to me. I've gotten both kinds off without nicking the gasket, but the ungroovy ones are more challenging (and I scratch the sides of them more).

Image
Groovy on the right, ungroovy on the left

PS: See How to clean dispersion screen for a list of more threads on the topic.
Dan Kehn

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Kristi

#5: Post by Kristi »

Okay. thanks Dan.
Kris

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jrtatl

#6: Post by jrtatl »

FWIW, I have removed my screen and gasket well over 100 times without destroying even one gasket. If you get leverage on the screen housing, the gasket usually comes right out with the screen. YMMV.

Also FWIW, the so-called groovy screens are the ones that come with my Expobar. I bought some ungroovy ones a while back. The groovy ones seem much sturdier; better construction. The ungroovy ones do not fit an Expobar as well as the groovy ones; however, the ungroovy ones seem to sit higher, allowing for a slightly larger dose. (I know this has nothing to do with the OP's machine, but thought I'd throw it in.)

Jeremy

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Kristi

#7: Post by Kristi »

Was wondering what you used to leverage the basket?
Kris

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jrtatl

#8: Post by jrtatl »

I use a flat head screwdriver to leverage the basket. admittedly, this is easier with a groovy screen. i do this with my ungroovy ones too, but, same as Dan, I tend to scratch the outside of the housing on the ungroovy. I have also destroyed an ungroovy screen by trying to use the "spot welding ring" as a groove.

Image


If you use the grouphead as the fulcrum, and get enough friction between the screwdriver and the outside of the screen housing, both the screen and the gasket will "pop" out together.

If my lame description doesn't help, I'll try to post a play-by-play pictorial when I have time. IMHO, the more often you remove the gasket, the less likely it will become "baked in." Theoretically, the only time you need to destroy a gasket in order to remove it is if it has become baked in.


Jeremy

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jrtatl

#9: Post by jrtatl »

HB wrote: In the end, there's no practical reason to remove the screen before the gasket is shot as long as you keep the machine regularly maintained.
to quote my favorite old school tennis player: "you cannot be serious!"

I backflush with detergent once a week. I pull my screen every two weeks or so. Despite the chemical backflush once a week, there are always brown deposits on the backside of my screen. maybe my situation is unique, but my experience tells me there is a marked advantage to regular pulling/soaking of the shower screen. I have about 8 screens (some groovy, some not) and 10 gaskets, so when I pull one set to soak, I throw a clean set on.

also, I pull and soak the screen anytime I significantly change the coffee I am using. I tend to buy from the same roasters over and over. When I switch from one roaster to the other, I'll clean the screen in order to start fresh. sounds anal, but I swear it improves the cup.

Jeremy

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Compass Coffee
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#10: Post by Compass Coffee »

HB wrote:If you are doing water backflushes after each session and weekly espresso cleaner backflushes, you'll be disappointed how squeaky clean it is behind an E61's dispersion screen (yes, curiosity drives me to pop out the screen every couple months).

...In the end, there's no practical reason to remove the screen before the gasket is shot as long as you keep the machine regularly maintained.
Dan, you may wish to revise that statement based on later findings of your own and other's found here. :cry:
Mike McGinness, Head Bean (Owner/Roast Master)
http://www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com