Gold Pro 2 Hole Steam Wand Tip - Page 2

Need help with equipment usage or want to share your latest discovery?
puffinjk

#11: Post by puffinjk »

Now we can do some serious micro foaming, outstanding product, thanks 1st-line, livia really likes this one.

See ya, Jim.

User avatar
cannonfodder
Team HB

#12: Post by cannonfodder »

I told Dan that I would do a little revue of the new two-hole steam tip he sent out to a lucky few.

I am using a Isomac millennium with the p-stat set to 1.3, 1.1 at the bottom end. I have to start by saying that I am new the espresso world. I have owned my own machine for about seven months now. I have gone through four to date, two are gone and two remain, my Gaggia Factory lever and my new Millennium. I make no pretenses to be an expert with it; I have only had the millennium for about three weeks now.


I decided to test the heat time between the (new style) factory tip and the new gold tip Dan sent. I did not want to waste a gallon of milk so I did my testing using plain old water. I needed to be able to maintain a constant set of variables for both the new and OEM tip. Not having a dozen of the same size frothing pitchers, I used a dozen heavy walled 12oz coffee cups. The cups had been in the freezer so each was at the same temp and the water was in a pitcher in the fridge.

After an hour warm up I did a quick steam line purge and started. I have to say that everything was very uniform. With the OEM tip, container from the freezer and 8oz of 40f water I constantly hit 140f in 48 seconds. The sample would carryover to 150f in another couple of seconds.

I changed to the new gold two-hole tip and started the process again using the exact same set of variables; the gold tip ran the test sample to 140f in 46 seconds. I had expected the new tip to heat slower but it averaged a couple of seconds quicker on my test.

I also did froth a couple of pitchers of milk using both tips. Doing my best to keep all of the variables as close as possible and trying to stretch the milk to the same temp (80f), then bury the tip and continue steaming to 140 which would carryover to 150f. Once again I kept to a measured 8oz 40f sample of 2% milk in a stainless steel pitcher fresh from the freezer.

The new gold tip appeared to give me more control and definitely produce more volume of microfoam than the OEM tip. The amount of turbulence I got in a smaller pitcher was better. I could position the pitcher to develop a very turbulent whirlpool, which incorporated the foam with the milk much better. I suspect that is by design, the steam holes are closer together and appear to have a much steeper angle than the OEM. I believe this allows fore more directional control of the jet in a small pitcher.

The OEM works better in a large pitcher using double the 8oz volume of milk. In that situation the OEM allowed for more turbulence in the pitcher due to the separation of the steam jets.

I have continued to use the gold tip for the past week. I can definitely produce better foam than the OEM tip. I even managed to pour my first latte art in a 10oz cup.

If you want nice foam using a small pitcher, frothing for one drink at a time, the new gold tip is an improvement.

P.S. I do have some photos but I don't have a public http to link them to, maybe Dan in put them in if I email them to him??

think I have it....

(edit, crash and burn)
Dave Stephens

framey (original poster)

#13: Post by framey (original poster) »

Nice one.

If you want to post some pictures check out Posting Images on HB in the News & Suggestion Box.

User avatar
cannonfodder
Team HB

#14: Post by cannonfodder »

Lets try it again...
Image

Image

Image

Image
Dave Stephens

User avatar
cannonfodder
Team HB

#15: Post by cannonfodder »

Worked that time, next time I will down size the photos.
Dave Stephens

User avatar
JonR10

#16: Post by JonR10 »

OK - mine came in yesterday's mail (THANKS DAN!!!) so this morning was my first chance to check it out. My first impressions:

1. Wow - I was impressed by how clean my OLD tip was inside.... :)
2. Wow - I was impressed by the craftsmanship of the GP2 tip
3. Wow - I did not have to adjust anything for proper orientation

Sorry.


I do like this tip a lot. It doesn't feel like a case of newness=fondness at all because I kinda wish it was stainless or chromed to match my steam wand.

Interestingly, although it seems to slow the steam a little I have not noticed that it takes longer to froth. Also, it may just be my impression but I think my froth is a little more dense and smooth. I'm going to need more practice with this for sure! :D

I once measured frothing time for 10 ounces on my Relax at almost exactly one minute (until I was done - no temp measurement). That was for someone else's benefit because I typically steam 4-6 ounces of milk for a single drink and I don't ever measure time or temperature.

Bottom line (after one day) is that I'm looking forward to more practice with this tip. My drinks today seemed extra-rich and creamy. My former favorite was the EPNW tip just edging out the CC2HT but now I think the GP2 will be a new fave.

thomas_cho

#17: Post by thomas_cho »

I have been using the GP2 tip for about a week now.

Spent the first two days getting used to the tip. Once I got used to it, and changed my technique a bit, I was able to get nicely textured milk for exactly one latte.

Previously with the stock tip, the milk would be literally blasted out of the jug. I probably had just 10 seconds, before the milk temperature hit 70 degrees Celsius.

I still have yet to produce any rosetta, but have produced a heart.

It's a good tip to use for the home where smaller quantities of milk are required.

On another topic, I used plumbers teflon to seal the threads, anyone know if this reacts with steam to produce are harmful effects?

Cheers

User avatar
JonR10

#18: Post by JonR10 »

thomas_cho wrote:On another topic, I used plumbers teflon to seal the threads, anyone know if this reacts with steam ....?
Teflon is safe for foodservice use, and does not react with steam. It is stable at very high temperatures and most harsh chemicals don't touch it.

Remember that teflon (PTFE) is also used as a lining for pots and pans.

User avatar
cannonfodder
Team HB

#19: Post by cannonfodder »

If you get the Teflon tape too hot it will fuse into something resembling a chunk of plastic. I had some left on the threads of a pipe when I brazed it. The leftover tape turned into a hard plastic like mass that was a pain to get off. There are also studies showing that the Teflon will break down and emit a toxic gas at extreme temperatures, i.e. leaving a pan on the stove, on high for 10 min. or heating it red hot while brazing (dough! :oops: ).

I would have to search for the article, but for an espresso machine, you will never get that hot.
Dave Stephens

BobY

#20: Post by BobY »

thomas_cho wrote:On another topic, I used plumbers teflon to seal the threads, anyone know if this reacts with steam to produce are harmful effects?
Teflon tape, if it's PTFE Teflon (most is), is one of the most inert thermoplastic/thermoset materials. It will not react to water unless you can get the temperature up over 200 deg C (about 400 deg F)!!

Not to worry! :wink:

BobY