Elektra Microcasa a Leva tripping GFCI

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bleblanc03
Posts: 5
Joined: Jan 28, 2012, 6:21 pm

Postby bleblanc03 » Mar 05, 2012, 1:26 am

I replaced the seals on my 1985 Elektra Microcasa Leva and rebuilt it with the electronics *exactly* how they were beforehand, but now the instant I close the power switch the GFCI trips.

So, apparently I didn't put 'em back together exactly the same...but I can't see how not.

This was not happening before I unwired the machine and replaced the seals. It is plugged into the same outlet as it has been - running every day - for the past 5 months.

I am not an electrical engineer, but I can troubleshoot if anyone has the expertise and is willing to try to help me. Please? I really miss my morning espresso.



La macchina:
Image
Image



Wiring before:
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Wiring now:
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-Beau LeBlanc

DrDregs
Posts: 593
Joined: Dec 11, 2009, 6:14 pm

Postby DrDregs » Mar 05, 2012, 1:47 am

This is a 1991 but double check the wiring in the bottom pics of this link. Some pics of yours might help too. It's more than likely something simple but could be the element shorting out or failing. It could also be the on/off switch. MAKE SURE THE POWER IS DISCONNECTED WHEN FIDDLING UNDERNEATH!

Did I mention turning the power off when working on the machine :shock: ?
http://www.francescoceccarelli.eu/Macch...91_eng.htm
"24 hours in a day, 24 beers in a case. Coincidence? I don't think so."

bleblanc03
Posts: 5
Joined: Jan 28, 2012, 6:21 pm

Postby bleblanc03 » Mar 05, 2012, 2:43 am

You did mention. Thank you for making sure. I wasn't going to do that, but I understand liability precautions pretty well.

As you may see, I edited my original posting to include photos of machine for ID, wiring before, and wiring now.

I tried swapping some points in my current path - without breaking the loop - to no avail.

My switch is fine...I've actually just finished replacing the burnt spade on the white power lead. I've checked inside the switch, where I found usual burning for a high-power device, but nothing out of place.

Still tripping any GFCI I connect to immediately.
Beau

DrDregs
Posts: 593
Joined: Dec 11, 2009, 6:14 pm

Postby DrDregs » Mar 05, 2012, 3:11 am

I would still be concerned about that burnt switch. My '85 has the original wiring and there is no indication of burnt or hot connections. A cheap part to replace if need be. I'd do it anyway.

Good pics too.
"24 hours in a day, 24 beers in a case. Coincidence? I don't think so."

duke-one
Posts: 475
Joined: Apr 13, 2007, 10:44 pm

Postby duke-one » Mar 05, 2012, 3:38 am

Unplug, disconnect both sides of heating element, tape the leads over or make sure they can't touch anything then see if it still trips. This would eliminate the element. In a simple machine like yours if it is not the heater any thing else touching the housing should be visible. Does the GFCI hold with other equipment plugged in?
Duke

bleblanc03
Posts: 5
Joined: Jan 28, 2012, 6:21 pm

Postby bleblanc03 » Mar 05, 2012, 4:04 am

@duke-one: I will try that tomorrow. Both GFCI circuits in my kitchen operate w/ other appliances (microwave on one, refrigerator on the other).

Thank you all for your replies. Am I wrong to think that tripping a GFCI means a grounding issue? I've got the ground spade beneath the same boiler mount screw as before, when the machine worked like a dream.

...can't help wishing I'd never tried to replace the seals. Only a few of them turned out to be dry/torn anyway.
Beau

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orphanespresso
Posts: 1803
Joined: Nov 18, 2007, 2:26 am

Postby orphanespresso » Mar 05, 2012, 5:43 am

You have a current leak somewhere. Make a short bridge pigtail wire for testing. Connect your multimeter leads to the spades of the power plug with tape or clips. Begin bypassing components with the pigtail and watch the multimeter set on ohms. You should be able to find the component that is either + or - continuity as in a switch or x ohms for heating element. If any switch reads ohms this is a problem. If any resistor wanders in reading then this is a problem.

Likely water has gotten in somewhere. This is usually the case.

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allon
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Joined: Apr 23, 2011, 8:49 am

Postby allon » Mar 05, 2012, 7:44 am

You mean between each spade (in turn) and ground. One expects there to be current between hot and neutral...

While that's great in theory, Doug, it won't find leaks from active components, problems that only occur when the heat is on, or very small leaks which are still enough to trip a gfci.

It's still a reasonable first step, though, to look for gross failures.
LMWDP #331

 
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