E61 Group Espresso Machine: Is its reputation justified? - Page 5

Need help with equipment usage or want to share your latest discovery?

E61 Group Espresso Machine: Is its reputation justified?

Yes
117
69%
No
13
8%
No opinion
40
24%
 
Total votes: 170

j7on

Postby j7on » Oct 04, 2006, 9:55 am

Inspired by Lino's modification i started thinking would it be possible to make a really "cheap" E61 espresso maker by just attaching the head to a boiler - running the entire boiler up to the magical 9bar - tweak the handle, open the valves & out comes glorious espresso under 9bars?

Of course it would not be a heat exchanger cuz no water would be circulating unless you are brewing.

But would it work? (E61heads are sometimes very cheap, used..) :D

lino

Postby lino » replying to j7on » Oct 04, 2006, 11:57 am

Yes that works (with one notable exception).

It is just what I did.
and it makes quite good coffee too. A little finicky, since it's different than a thermosyphon E-61, but yes it works.

Only thing is...

Wasn't cheap...

As I recall, I added up what I spent to make mine (which I tracked carefully), and the total came to about $750. HOWEVER, that didn't include any machining or raw materials, as I scrounged those and did the machining myself...

Add in those costs and it's clearly cheaper to buy an entry level E-61 machine...

But if you are doing it just to do it, that that's a whole different matter...

ciao

lino

User avatar
HB
Admin

Postby HB » Oct 04, 2006, 8:20 pm

j7on wrote:Inspired by Lino's modification i started thinking would it be possible to make a really "cheap" E61 espresso maker by just attaching the head to a boiler - running the entire boiler up to the magical 9bar...

I'd have to check, but I believe most espresso (steam) boilers are tested at the factory at 2 or 3 bar. Lino used a thick-walled stainless steel boiler that he machined for this purpose. Really, really bad things are sure to occur if you pressurize a stock steam boiler beyond its factory-tested limits. An explosion of hot water, steam, and flying debris is certain to ruin your day, if not your life. :shock:
Dan Kehn

User avatar
luca
Team HB

Postby luca » Oct 04, 2006, 11:48 pm

Surely you would have better temperature control if you just got a single boiler machine where the group is basically the base of the boiler, then added a second boiler for steam. This would give you a LM-style saturated group, of sorts. Of course, you wouldn't have the PI.

Cheers,

Luca
LMWDP #034 | 2011: Q Grader Exam, Brewer's Cup #3, Australian Cup Tasting #1

j7on

Postby j7on » Oct 05, 2006, 6:20 am

Yeah, ofcourse i would make the boiler out of something like, old diving bottle(small), fire extinguisher bottle = anything you can set your hands on for free:)

Ofcourse i would have to chrome it or similar from the inside for the water...

Lets see if i have some spare time during the winter.

Richard

Postby Richard » Oct 05, 2006, 10:33 am

luca wrote:Surely you would have better temperature control if you just got a single boiler machine where the group is basically the base of the boiler, then added a second boiler for steam.

In other words, Silvia with the addition of a steam boiler?

(Enter La Spaziale S1, stage left) . . .
Richard J. Wyble

User avatar
Compass Coffee
Sponsor

Postby Compass Coffee » Oct 05, 2006, 12:08 pm

Richard wrote:In other words, Silvia with the addition of a steam boiler?

Not really. Silvia's group passively heated versus saturated as being proposed.
Mike McGinness, Head Bean (Owner/Roast Master)
http://www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com

PaulTheRoaster

Postby PaulTheRoaster » Oct 06, 2006, 3:03 pm

I decided to swap the vibe pump in my Faema with a rotary pump and delay relay.

I bought a used carbonator (without the tank), because it came out quite a bit cheaper that way.

BUT, if you were to build a single-boiler, a used carbonator with tank would be a great start (and probably under $100). The tanks are stainless, and the pumps are usually set to 250 psi, so 130 would be no problem. You'd just need a solenoid valve, an element, and a group.